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runing shoe for forefoot runers with flat foot (Read 1532 times)

danahevi


    Hello

     

    i have flatfoot  and my runung technick is land on the forefoot ,

    i wouild like to get recomendatin for runing shoe for this technick that fit flat foot ?

     

    thanks

      Hello

       

      i have flatfoot  and my runung technick is land on the forefoot ,

      i wouild like to get recomendatin for runing shoe for this technick that fit flat foot ?

       

      thanks

      I'm assuming you are seeking "minimalist" type racing flats for a flat-footed person???  

       

      I think the first thing you'd need to identify is whether or not your flat-foot had come from lack of foot strengthening (arch cannot hold up, well, the arch) or more structural reason.  If former, your arch will develop as you strengthen your foot.  Of course, wearing minimalist type shoes is one of the ways to do so.

       

      If you're landing on your forefoot, you don't want too much heel-forefoot thickness difference (I guess some people call this "low-profile"?).  If your shoe's heel is too thick and you're landing on your forefoot, there's a tendency that your foot slides forward and jam your toes into the edge of the shoe causing black toenails.  

       

      Perhaps the most important element is that the shape of the shoe fits into the shape of your foot.  The best way to check is to step on a piece of paper and trace the shape of your foot--all the way down underneath your arch as well (by tracing WHERE YOUR FOOT ACTUALLY MAKES CONTACT WITH THE GROUND).  Many flatfooted people's foot shows more straight foot whereas, if you have a high arch, your foot tends to follow a certain curvature.  Although your foot does have a certain curve one way or the other (lateral side of your foot) regardless of the height of the arch but, in general, low-arch people tend to have more straight foot.  So if you flip over the shoe and check out the shape of the shoe, you can tell if the shoe is more curved or straight.  Most of NB shoes used to be very straight until they started making those slipper-like minimalist shoes, Minimus I believe they are called.  But other NB racing shoes still come fairly straight and you may want to check them out.  

       

      Some brands, such as ASICS or adidas, have their logo act as supporter to hold up the arch.  Even though the logo wouldn't do that, Nike or Brooks would have some reinforcement to hold up the arch.  If the shoe has a decent curve and fits your foot, as you slip your foot in the shoe and put weight over it, you should feel the arch sits right over this arch area of the shoe.  As the shoe manufacturers moved away from this natural curve of the foot and started to bulk up the shoe, they needed something else to fill in this gap so they created shapely insole, sometimes with extra arch cookie (remember that removal arch cookie Nike use to have yeeeeears ago?).  This actually had given us some extra space (literally) to play with.  Sometimes when I get shoes and if the shoe already has a nice curve and extra "arch support" is too much, I just simply remove the original insole and replace that with something more simple and flat.  Most racing flats today have this "shapely" insole still (though in theory, if the shoe is built correctly, you shouldn't need it) so you may be able to just remove it and replace it without any extra arch cushion.  

       

      Besides NB, some Saucony racing flats seem to be more straight than others also.

      ilp


        Run in neutral runner shoes, maybe try the more minimal shoes, do not buy any support or motion control shoes.

         

        I have "flat feet" technically. I land on the midfoot/forefoot. I went to a prestigious local running store and was told that I need arch support for that reason. So I got sold Asics GT-2140 with Powerstep inserts for arch support. This was after i was running for a while in unmodified GT-2130's. After running with these for a few days, I couldn't run more than 2 miles without pain developing in my right arch (and my left arch began aching). I couldn't' finish a 3 mile run. It was painful. I took out the inserts and put back the original insoles. Problem gone.

         

        Also, recent research shows that your feet might be flat statically, but might not be flat dynamically (while you're running). So the static "wet test" can be misleading: http://www.runblogger.com/2011/12/application-of-wet-test-and-static-arch.html

         

        Also listen to whatever Nobby415 says, for he is the man.


        Ostrich runner

          My feet are very large, very wide, and have a long low arch. Essentially flat. Shoes that are made to support my low arch are the ones that bug my feet. But the biggest mistake I've ever made with shoes is lacing them too tightly. 

          http://www.runningahead.com/groups/Indy/forum

          danahevi


            thank you very much guys for the reply.

             

            in the past 5 yesrs i run with adistar runing shoe of adidas.

            every 7-8 month i suffer from shin splints.

            i rest for 2-3 months and come back to run.....

             

            so in the last time it happened i went to prestigious  runing shoe. and they picture me runing on the treadmil. and made some exams.

            and they recommened me buy the KAYANO 17.

            after i run 2 times with this shoe i wouldnt able to walk on my right foot. i had teriible pai in the inner part of the foot.

            then i bought another shoe of asics KINSIE 4 and also had pains and this shoe doesnt fit me.

             

            now that i read what Nobby say i understnd that i need shoe that isnt so heavy in the back like these 2 types.

             

            Im thinking to try the Sacuny Kinvra or Sacuny Triumph or Sacuny Omani - what you think on these options ?


            Ostrich runner

              I don't know those, but Nobby knows best. I had Kayanos do that to me also.

              http://www.runningahead.com/groups/Indy/forum

              ilp


                thank you very much guys for the reply.

                 

                in the past 5 yesrs i run with adistar runing shoe of adidas.

                every 7-8 month i suffer from shin splints.

                i rest for 2-3 months and come back to run.....

                 

                so in the last time it happened i went to prestigious  runing shoe. and they picture me runing on the treadmil. and made some exams.

                and they recommened me buy the KAYANO 17.

                after i run 2 times with this shoe i wouldnt able to walk on my right foot. i had teriible pai in the inner part of the foot.

                then i bought another shoe of asics KINSIE 4 and also had pains and this shoe doesnt fit me.

                 

                now that i read what Nobby say i understnd that i need shoe that isnt so heavy in the back like these 2 types.

                 

                Im thinking to try the Sacuny Kinvra or Sacuny Triumph or Sacuny Omani - what you think on these options ?

                 

                It's the same old crap, the running shoe store gave you a stability shoe with arch support, and now you have pain. do not buy a stability shoe again. 

                 

                Saucony Kinvara is a great shoe, less heel, fairly cushy but not bulky. It's not as minimal as the other shoes (my NB Minimus Road is more minimal and less cushy), but I think it would work well for you coming from full-on running shoes. I say get that.


                Old, Slow, Happy

                  I just wanted to say that I have very flat feet and I'm rather large (6' 3" and 210 pounds).  I was running in Brooks Beasts until I got runners knee.  I decided to go minimal.  After going too quickly and tearing a calf muscle, I now run in the Kinvara 2, the Brooks Green Silence, and the Brooks Pure Grit for trail.  Nobby called me a fool for running in the Beasts and he was correct.  My knees are much better now that I can use the Kinvaras, etc.  I also use the Asics DS Racers occasionally for races.  If you decide to go to the Kinvaras, also get a pair of DS Trainers to help you move to the lower drop shoes.  I chenged too quickly and had injuries.  The Asics DS trainers are a good middle shoe to help you step down.    Disclaimer:  This is what worked for me.  The next shoes I buy will be zero drop.  Good Luck!!

                    every 7-8 month i suffer from shin splints.

                    i rest for 2-3 months and come back to run.....

                     

                     I don't know for sure but wonder if the shin splints may not be related to the running shoes much. Running shoes are not always the primary cause of every running injury.

                     

                    Certain kinds of shin problems are an occupational hazard if you're a forefoot striker. If you seem to be permanently predisposed to this injury you may need to find some preventative maintenance strategies that help, and then sort of plan to do them for the rest of your life. Just guessing, but stretching and massaging your calf muscles to make them looser and longer might be a place to start. Making sure your stride is short/fast/light at any speed will also help reduce stresses.

                     

                    I'm a fairly big guy, forefoot striker, and wear Kayanos for daily training and racing ultras. I got to wearing Kayanos through a multi-year process of shifting shoe type gradually though. I suspect that if I had switched from very structured shoes to them in one step I would have suffered serious injuries.

                    danahevi


                      yes I think i will need to do excrsize as well to prevent shin splints.

                       

                      if you have any recomendations to such excrsize please let me know.

                       

                      i'll check in the net as well.