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"conversational pace" (Read 1346 times)

    I keep seeing mentions of "conversational pace": a slow pace in which you can hold a conversation easily. My long runs right now are 4+ miles, but I am already breathing heavily after a half mile. I don't feel like I have a conversational pace except walking! Confused
    - Lance


    Needs more cowbell!

      I hear that. I'm mildly asthmatic and have tiny lungs, so I don't think it's possible for me to be running/jogging and be very conversational much beyond that half mile. I'm not gasping for breath, or anything, but I'm not able to carry on a relaxed and lengthy conversation, either. And I'm by no means fast, either. My runs have thus far been in the 3-4 mile range and at 11-12 minute pace, so it's not like I'm cruising at breakneck speeds, either. k

      Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

      '14 Goals:

      • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

      • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

        Lance: I can attest to the fact that it is possible to "run" at over a 20 minute mile pace! I have had to do that sometimes when I'm on hilly trails. And on level surfaces my "conversational" pace doesn't usually get above 17 1/2 minute miles. If the pace you're at right now isn't working for you, try slowing down. You might be surprised how much more fun it is to run when you're not gasping for breath! Zoom-zoom: Then again, I don't have asthma, so maybe it's different. But from what I've read on other forums, people with asthma can exercise without gasping too. Some use their inhalers _before_ runs. Some have found that consistant lower-intensity exercise helps some with their asthma. Why not check with your doc and see what they say about your running and your asthma? (I know, I know - my answer seems to always be "check with the doc!")

        Roads were made for journeys...


        Needs more cowbell!

          Ha, I do have an inhaler, but I am bad about using it...mostly because my asthma is so mild and doesn't bother me real often. And I can definitely tell that running HAS improved my lung capacity/function. But you are right that I should have a chat with my PCP. And it's not so much that I'm gasping as I'm just not really comfortable for intense discussion...I can talk a bit, though not long sentences. Does that make much sense..? :P k

          Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

          '14 Goals:

          • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

          • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

            Ha, I do have an inhaler, but I am bad about using it...mostly because my asthma is so mild and doesn't bother me real often. And I can definitely tell that running HAS improved my lung capacity/function. But you are right that I should have a chat with my PCP. And it's not so much that I'm gasping as I'm just not really comfortable for intense discussion...I can talk a bit, though not long sentences. Does that make much sense..? :P k
            Yeah, I know what you mean. I'm about there when my HR is 160-175.

            Roads were made for journeys...

            waddleonbeth


              I do the run/walk method so i talk when i walk. my HR averages about the same 160-175.
                Hi, waddleonbeth, and welcome! I'm guessing from your name you're a fan of the Penguin? I've enjoyed his stuff. Smile I used to run/walk with a group here in Raleigh, and I found that the walk breaks let me keep an overall faster pace than I could with straight running. It felt really strange when I realized my overall time was less when I WALKED! ::shrug:: Janell

                Roads were made for journeys...

                  I believe that conversational pace doe not mean you can perform a speach without sounding winded. But you can say 1 relatively short sentence, wait for your runing buddy to respond and then you can say another sentence. It is definately not like you sit in a sofa and talk. But still not too stressfull.
                  Run more.