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Shin Splints and Ankle Brace (Read 37 times)

HerdFan2000


    So I have extremely high arches but I also have severe overpronation when I run. I’ve tried both Soft shoes with inserts and motion control shoes. They do help some the video still shows I overpronate quite a bit with either. 
    here’s my question I was thinking about trying lace up ankle braces to help keep the ankle from collapsing in so much. Anybody have any thoughts on this or heard of anybody trying it for shinsplints?

      Have you thought about custom made orthotics? This solved my issue 25 years ago when I had shin splints for 2 years. But you also need to do calf flexibility work and dorsiflexion strength work. Need to address cause and let these heal. I would not use an ankle brace for shin splints.

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      HerdFan2000


        I tried Those a few years ago. One other issue I have is the ball and heel of my foot are on 2 different angle plans. The ball of my foot wants to roll in for overpronation but my heel wants to run but the force of running the whole foot rolls in words for overpronation

         

        Have you thought about custom made orthotics? This solved my issue 25 years ago when I had shin splints for 2 years. But you also need to do calf flexibility work and dorsiflexion strength work. Need to address cause and let these heal. I would not use an ankle brace for shin splints.

          Are you sure you are overpronating and not supinating? I tend to land on the outside of my foot when I run which causes the inside of my feet to jerk down when I land and give me shin splints. I also have very high arches and when I sit down on the couch with my feet propped up and relaxed, I can see my feet naturally turning outward. The outside of my shoes wear down much faster on the bottom.

           

          The trick I found was to stretch out the tendons on each side of my ankles before going on an intense or long run. I found using a nylon cargo strap works best to wrap around the ball of my foot and pull the outside of my foot up to stretch the inside tendon. After doing this for 10 seconds, I can prop my feet back up and see how they are now correctly aligned for a flat landing.

           

          This was the trick for me and I normally will wrap my calves in Ace bandages the day after a tough run or race to let the compression help heal things. I tried using insoles with high arch support but this seemed to make my feet turn outwards even worse.

          Memphis / serious runner for 3 years / 34 male

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          HerdFan2000


            Thank you for the response. When I'm standing normal the ball of my foot is normal flat to the ground and the heel is actually turning out like you said supinating.  When I run I'm a mid foot lander and land correctly slightly on the outside of the foot and then roll in. In the video you can see my ankle crash in more than it should.  My wear pattern is on the inside of the shoe on both on ball and heel.

            I'm going to video my feet barefoot on the treadmill to see what my heel is actually doing.

             

            Are you sure you are overpronating and not supinating? I tend to land on the outside of my foot when I run which causes the inside of my feet to jerk down when I land and give me shin splints. I also have very high arches and when I sit down on the couch with my feet propped up and relaxed, I can see my feet naturally turning outward. The outside of my shoes wear down much faster on the bottom.

             

            The trick I found was to stretch out the tendons on each side of my ankles before going on an intense or long run. I found using a nylon cargo strap works best to wrap around the ball of my foot and pull the outside of my foot up to stretch the inside tendon. After doing this for 10 seconds, I can prop my feet back up and see how they are now correctly aligned for a flat landing.

             

            This was the trick for me and I normally will wrap my calves in Ace bandages the day after a tough run or race to let the compression help heal things. I tried using insoles with high arch support but this seemed to make my feet turn outwards even worse.

            HerdFan2000


              I went back and took a look at my relaxed feet.  My feet definitely turn outward.  More so my hell really turns in.  When I ran yesterday I tried to pay attention to how my foot hit the ground and how it pushed off.  I'm a mid-foot lander and I could feel the foot rolling in and when I pushed off all the weight goes off the very inside of my foot,  Feels like the majority off my big toe.  So for the that few miles I focused on not allowing the foot to roll so far in and made sure I pushed off the whole front of the foot and not just the big toe.  Actually felt pretty good but I feared I would have very sore new muscles today.  So far shins/legs feel good.

               

              Are you sure you are overpronating and not supinating? I tend to land on the outside of my foot when I run which causes the inside of my feet to jerk down when I land and give me shin splints. I also have very high arches and when I sit down on the couch with my feet propped up and relaxed, I can see my feet naturally turning outward. The outside of my shoes wear down much faster on the bottom.

               

              The trick I found was to stretch out the tendons on each side of my ankles before going on an intense or long run. I found using a nylon cargo strap works best to wrap around the ball of my foot and pull the outside of my foot up to stretch the inside tendon. After doing this for 10 seconds, I can prop my feet back up and see how they are now correctly aligned for a flat landing.

               

              This was the trick for me and I normally will wrap my calves in Ace bandages the day after a tough run or race to let the compression help heal things. I tried using insoles with high arch support but this seemed to make my feet turn outwards even worse.