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C25K - newbie question (Read 1378 times)

litlbarb


    I'm new to running and new to the boards. I was glad to find this thread, because I've been feeling discouraged about my running. I'm on week 9 of c25k. Most of the time, I'm running on the cross country trail at my son's school (nice!) but recently used a treadmill and realized how slow I really am. What a disappointment! Any and all encouragement is welcome.
      I'm new to running and new to the boards. I was glad to find this thread, because I've been feeling discouraged about my running. I'm on week 9 of c25k. Most of the time, I'm running on the cross country trail at my son's school (nice!) but recently used a treadmill and realized how slow I really am. What a disappointment! Any and all encouragement is welcome.
      Just keep telling yourself that SPEED DOES NOT MATTER! I've gone through discouragement a few times during the last year, but I've found if I stick it out, within a few weeks I'm back on track. And when I did the C25K program, I had to repeat several of the weeks. It's OK! As Long Run Nick said, you want to approach this as a life-time sport - you've got plenty of time to improve. Good luck, and keep us posted on how you're doing! Teresa
      litlbarb


        Thank you for your reply. I keep telling myself it's fine, and my mind knows it's fine, but boy oh boy the ego sure didn't like it. Black eye
          Barb and Teresa, I'm new to this place and am excited, but nervous, about beginning the c25k program - but am committed to start. I've been in terrible shape, ex-smoker, overweight and 41. My doctor said I was at high risk for stroke and heart attack and the majority of risk factors were things I was doing wrong. So that was my moment to decide to get moving. I ran in high school and loved it - so I chose running to devote time to. You two are doing great!!! I'm SO inspired!! Thanks for sharing how you started - that's really encouraged me a lot! Lynne =-)
            Barb and Teresa, I'm new to this place and am excited, but nervous, about beginning the c25k program - but am committed to start. I've been in terrible shape, ex-smoker, overweight and 41. My doctor said I was at high risk for stroke and heart attack and the majority of risk factors were things I was doing wrong. So that was my moment to decide to get moving. I ran in high school and loved it - so I chose running to devote time to. You two are doing great!!! I'm SO inspired!! Thanks for sharing how you started - that's really encouraged me a lot! Lynne =-)
            Good luck, Lynne! I would suggest writing down your run/walks on a calendar so you can see how you're improving, and also to make you feel guilty if you skip too many days! That helps me a lot. Also, remember it's OK TO REPEAT WEEKS in the C25k program. My friend and I didn't even say, "We're on week such and such" for long, because we repeated so many times. You just want to keep improving slowly. If you stick with the program, I think you'll be surprised at how quickly your health improves. I don't even have to take acid reflux medication anymore, I think because I lost so much weight (30 pounds). Let us know how you're doing with the program, and if you have any questions. One question I had early on was, "Will my breathing EVER get any easier??" For me, the answer was yes, but it happened very slowly and gradually. Last week I ran an hour and 3 minutes without stopping, and I never felt like I was dying as I used to after just a few minutes. Last year at this time, I was still writing things on my log like, "Ran 22:43 without stopping." I couldn't even make it to the next even minute! Teresa
              It is amazing how many people take up running and literally change their lives (or I should say, "outlook of life")by doing so. Some of you may know me as "Lydiard disciple". Some people see "Lydiard" as outdated and old-fashion. But hear me out; he is the Father of Jogging--he started the first ever organized jogging club in New Zealand way back in 1961; and here's how it went. He got a group of 20 people; youngest was 50 and the oldest was 74. They all had had at least one coronary attack before taking up "jogging". Most of them, if not all, couldn't even run 200m, a half a lap around a local high school track, without stopping. They kept within their limitations; they kept it slow and kept on keeping on; and 8 months later, every single one of them was running 20 miles without stopping. Incidentally, it was this 74-year-old man, Andy Steddman, who shocked a gentleman by the name of Bill Bowerman from Oregon--co-founder of Nike--to bring the concept of "jogging" back to the US and he started a jogging program in Eugene, OR, in 1963 and the rest is history. Bowerman was 50 when he visited Lydiard and this particular Sunday, when he was finishing up his breakfast, Lydiard came in and invited him to go "jogging" with local people, having played football and always considered himself "fit", he agreed. Well, within a half mile of starting, he quickly found himself at the back of the pack, laboring hard. Andy Steddman, more than 2 decades senior to Bowerman, came around and wispered to him; "Mr. Bowerman, I see you're having problem?" He recalled, "I didn't answer because I couldn't talk!" (by the way, this is quite famous story but I did actually hear it first hand from Bill). So far, things were okay until Stedman said to Bowerman, "I know a shortcut!" We all start somewhere (as you did take up that all-important first step!). It could be discouraging at times but stay within your own limitations. As long as you don't over-exert yourself, the body's ability for "adaptation" will quickly take place and you'll fine what once was laboring effort will soon becomes comfortable effort. So the more specific question of yours; when will it happen? Or "how long will it take?" Well, you tell us! We're all individuals. The background of training or fitness is all defferent from each of us; we have different phsycal make-ups and all. You just cannot simply give numbers to this kind of things. The only thing I can tell you is that, as long as you don't push it, it'll come much quicker than you think. What I like to do personally, and I suggest to others as well, is; do this fitness test every other week or so. Take a flat course, preferably around residential area or forest trail where hopefully there are things to block wind so the effect of head-/tail-wind is minimal. Set out to go for 15 minutes run. After 15 minutes, turn around and come back on the same course. If it takes longer than 15 minutes, you'll know that you ran too fast in the beginning so next time around, you adjust your pace. You shoudl finish the run knowing you challenged yourself but comfortable; knowing, if you had to, you could have run a little bit faster, or a little bit more. Once you established your comfortable effort; every other week or so, go out and do this 15 mintues out-and-back run. Continue 15-minutes ont-and-back. Note where your turn-around point is ever time you do this run. You will quickly note your turn-around point is going further and further. A word of caution here though; once you note this progress, you'll start to feel good and, knowingly or subconsciously, you'll start to push the pace just see your progress. This way, your progress is not coming naturally--it is forced. So be careful with it. Don't check your watch every corner to see if you're in fact progressing. Do it completely blind. There's this guy, known as HRE at letsrun message board, or Rengle at old Cool Running message board; he once said, "Let the pace come to you." This is so true. This is the way to go about. Let your progress come to you; don't force it. For some, it may only take 3 or 4 weeks; but for some, it may take 5 or 6 months. But it WILL come. Lastly, here's a story that could be encouraging. I met with this coach in Japan; Isao Sasaki. Unfortunately he died of cancer about 12 years ago. A great guy; coached 2 or 3 guys who ran around 2:10 for marathon. His most well-known protoge is Eriko Asai who ran 1988 Olympic marathon. Her PR was 2:26 in the end. They were heavily into LSD, I mean, long slow distance. Sometimes they would go as long as 4 or 5 hours "run" at very liesurely pace--sometimes as slow as 12-minute-mile pace! Her well-known quote was; "I always get passed by some old lady!" and laugh...
                So good to see you here Nobby. Seems weird to see you introduce yourself, though. Who doesn't know you? Now, do we want to bait Richard over here or is that just asking for trouble? I can only occasionally get through on CoolRunning to see your ongoing debate. Litlbarb, are you enjoying your runs? Do you feel healthier? Do you feel better than you did 9 weeks ago? Those are the questions, I'd ask myself. That's all that really matters. Relax and enjoy. You will get fitter (and faster) whether you like it or not so long as you stay with it. And FWIW, there are lots of fast runners who train slow and slow runners who train too fast. (formerly martinjames)
                  I am so glad I found this thread and this website! (Another lost soul looking for a home after Cool Running...) I really needed this. I had been fighting the feelings of frustration when the pregnant speedwalker passes me on the indoor track, and wondering if anyone else runs a 15 minute mile. But, then I remind myself that 6 months ago before I found Cool Running the very possiblity of me jogging for 30 continous minutes at ANY pace would have made me laugh. Then cry a little. The whole idea of going as slow as I need to had honestly never occured to me before someone told me it was ok. And FWIW, my 15 minute miles have already decreased....they've already turned into 13 minute miles without me even realizing it, still running comfortably, feeling good during and after my runs. I really understand now that just building up the miles will build up the speed in your body's own good time!
                  Heroes never die. They just reload.
                    I am so glad I found this thread and this website! (Another lost soul looking for a home after Cool Running...) I really needed this. I had been fighting the feelings of frustration when the pregnant speedwalker passes me on the indoor track, and wondering if anyone else runs a 15 minute mile. But, then I remind myself that 6 months ago before I found Cool Running the very possiblity of me jogging for 30 continous minutes at ANY pace would have made me laugh. Then cry a little. The whole idea of going as slow as I need to had honestly never occured to me before someone told me it was ok. And FWIW, my 15 minute miles have already decreased....they've already turned into 13 minute miles without me even realizing it, still running comfortably, feeling good during and after my runs. I really understand now that just building up the miles will build up the speed in your body's own good time!
                    WTG, Daisy! It sounds as if you're "getting it." 13 minute miles are great! Keep up the good work. Teresa
                      I'm new to running and new to the boards. I was glad to find this thread, because I've been feeling discouraged about my running. I'm on week 9 of c25k. Most of the time, I'm running on the cross country trail at my son's school (nice!) but recently used a treadmill and realized how slow I really am. What a disappointment! Any and all encouragement is welcome.
                      I never bother to believe the numbers on treadmill (except maybe for the clock!). It seems the MPH gets a bit off with brand to brand. There was a time when I totally covered the MPH showing of the treadmill; just to check the clock (my MPH seems to fluctuate anywhere from 4.5MPH to 9.5MPH!). I didn't care how fast (or how slow) I was running; cared more for how I felt. I never record how many mile I run; therefore how many minutes-per-mile. I only record how long I run and how I feel.


                      Just Be

                        I never bother to believe the numbers on treadmill (except maybe for the clock!). It seems the MPH gets a bit off with brand to brand. There was a time when I totally covered the MPH showing of the treadmill; just to check the clock (my MPH seems to fluctuate anywhere from 4.5MPH to 9.5MPH!). I didn't care how fast (or how slow) I was running; cared more for how I felt. I never record how many mile I run; therefore how many minutes-per-mile. I only record how long I run and how I feel.
                        To back you up on the treadmill speed thing, I literally *just* calibrated my HRM at a 400m track and ran 2 miles to test its accuracy. Still, the treadmills at teh gym where I go say I'm running 15 to 30 seconds per mile slower than I actually am. I've noticed with these particular treadmills that the margin of error increases as speed increases.
                          Congratulations all couch-to-5K people! Wherever you are now, be it just starting out or close to finishing the program, you're probably in a better place for having made the decision to start running. Please come join our little couch-to-5K support group (cilck!) and enrich our forum with your experiences! Big grin

                          Roads were made for journeys...

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