BAREFOOT (Read 458 times)


Professional Antagonist

    Barefoot running? Sounds like a silly fad if you ask me.

    Barefoot Running University- Jason's barefoot running site

    warner


      Lol

      Enric Hilversum


        I loved running barefoot but I still remember my mother's face when they were sewing my foot back together.

        I never wanted to put her thru that again.

         

        Same here. Shod. Working boots. Heavy working boots.
        20cm rusty steel nail while unloading a truck inside a magazine.
        Got a tetanus shot too.

        And it wasn't the last one.


        Enric Hilversum


          mikeymike - running sneakers were first introduced by NIKE, feel free to wikipedia. But it wasnt until the late 70's to early 80s that a large number of people were purchasing sneakers specifically designed to run in.

           

          Depends on what you call "sneakers", here in Holland what we call "sneakers" are canvas sneakers. These can be considered minimalist shoes and they are zero-drop too. These were widely used for decades. I myself ran 10-15km every day during my military service and I can't recall nobody having any issue besides blisters and eventual bruises.Another form of shoes used by athletes were plimsolls and espadrilles. The latter have a rather thick sole but they are nevertheless zero drop.

           

          The proper running shoes, the spikes, weren't much more than a ballet shoes with no heel (!) and a leather plate in the forefoot where spikes where attached.

           

          Generally speaking we forget that barefoot running is actually something practised by quite a lot of athletes many of them meant  to become elites. Anybody recall Kenya and Ethiopia? I guess everybody does. And I assume that everybody can figure out that Nike and Adidas aren't quite widely used by kids and youngsters in these countries. Note that elites do not run in "Running boots" but in flats.

           

          Anyway, both barefooters, minimalists and shod runners tend to forget a basic principle: That training is an adaptation to a movement pattern and that we thus will (almost) always achieve our best results with the equipment / method that we train with. A good (while exaggerated) example may be bicycling vs. rowing where you train and develop certain muscles and tendons to work best for the activity that you are doing. In this sense the difference from running shod vs running barefoot or even the difference between choices in shoes are much like that.

           

          From a purely anthropological and physiological point of view barefoot or minimalist running makes quite some sense as all our muscular system (not only our feet!) have evolved for running barefoot. I think that everybody will have no choice but to agree on that because trying to imagine Lucy with a pair of flashy pink Brooks is a bit ridiculous and modern humans didn't invent the shoe until 30-35.000 years ago, and even these weren't much more than a layer of leather under your sole.

           

          And don't forget Zola Budd and Abebe Bikila !

            I run barefoot because it's a great way to get free shoes. Seriously, start a blog about barefoot running, and shoe companies will send you thousands of dollars worth of footwear.

              I bought into the craze and got some VFF's. I ran a few times on my normal road route and both times the pain of landing on my forefoot kept me from running more than a mile in them. I wasn't battling any injuries so I had no reason to try it out other than the marketing getting to me. I never used them again and felt silly for wasting my money. I have no problem running in my comfy shoes and I'm sticking with them. I don't see the need for me personally to suffer through the adaption period to be able to run far again when I can run just fine with running shoes now. More power to you if you like running barefoot, but it's just not for me.

              Runner's High® - Endurance Nutrition

              www.runnershighnutrition.com


              Barefoot Jeff

                I am into week 5 of barefoot running.

                 

                I am running less than my normal weekly average. I was up to about 35-45 mpw, but lately have been doing about 20-25.

                I am running around 25% barefoot. I peaked at 9miles barefoot in a week, and felt I needed to slow the training down a bit.

                I really enjoy running barefoot. It is amazing to me that people feel the need to post that they like wearing shoes. We know. We see your feet.

                I have been getting some sore spots / blisters on some runs, but I consider this part of the training I planned on. Having avoided the VFF $100 or more investment, I cant blame any company if this doesnt work out for me. Nor do I feel dumb for having paid to try something. On the other end, I did recently (2 months ago) spend $120 on some sneakers. They are very cushioned. (They were recommended by the shoe shoe SALESman) I dislike these shoes very much. I feel that my form is worse. However, Im not ready to give them away. I have used them on a couple of runs these past 2 months, but mostly I use them as recovery shoes. When my feet are especially sore, I wear them and forget about the sore spots.

                 

                I wish all well on their attempts to go barefoot. I had hoped that this forum would be a great place to trade tips and experience, but unfortunately, many people think that their "one and done" story needs to be posted on here. Even more amazing are the negative Nancies who wont even try running barefoot, but want to tell us all about their opinion.

                RUN SAFE.     Barefoot 1st attempt: 6/9/13. PRs: 5k, 10k, 6.55 =8:16 pace.

                     SUN 4/27 Simsbury River Run 10K

                   5/25 Memorial Day FM    6/1 ING Iron Horse HM    10/11 Hartford ING FM   10/12 Rhinebeck Fall HM

                northernman


                Fight The Future

                  I haven't tried barefoot yet, but I'd like to start working it in gradually. I have switched completely over the last month or so from thick stability shoes to much lower or zero heel-toe drop and less padding. This was to try to cure PF, and I think it has mostly worked for me. Still having a little generalized left foot pain, but could be more due to foot muscle exercises and recovery rather than PF at this point. A question I have for the barefooters and other forefoot runners is how do you run at faster paces and still avoid heel landing? I think I have the forefoot landing down for easy paces, but when I try to do sprints I feel that I revert to heel landing and it's not so comfortable? Maybe I still need faster turnover, or is it more a function of larger steps and pushing out more behind you?

                    I doubt my answer will be helpful, but here it goes:

                     

                    First, learn to run barefoot. That is, using your bare feet to teach yourself how to run gently. Do this slowly and over a long period of time. Never push through pain, always stop when things start to hurt. Eventually, you'll be able to run for an hour or two without shoes, but speed will still be a mystery. Then you'll sign up for a 5K, and if you're an idiot like me you'll try to keep up with the local high school track team. Without thinking about form or foot landing or any of that other gobblygook, you'll run fast, and your feet won't hurt at all, so long as you remember to run gently. Which, if you've been running for a while without shoes, you should know to at least some degree how to do.

                     

                    Most, but not all, barefoot runners never land heel first. Many "minimalist" runners do, but think they don't. Personally, I don't think heel-first landing is so bad as long as you're gentle.

                     

                    Josh

                    4:57 barefoot mile

                    17:38 barefoot 5K

                     

                    I haven't tried barefoot yet, but I'd like to start working it in gradually. I have switched completely over the last month or so from thick stability shoes to much lower or zero heel-toe drop and less padding. This was to try to cure PF, and I think it has mostly worked for me. Still having a little generalized left foot pain, but could be more due to foot muscle exercises and recovery rather than PF at this point. A question I have for the barefooters and other forefoot runners is how do you run at faster paces and still avoid heel landing? I think I have the forefoot landing down for easy paces, but when I try to do sprints I feel that I revert to heel landing and it's not so comfortable? Maybe I still need faster turnover, or is it more a function of larger steps and pushing out more behind you?

                      I am into week 5 of barefoot running.

                       

                      I am running less than my normal weekly average. I was up to about 35-45 mpw, but lately have been doing about 20-25.

                      I am running around 25% barefoot. I peaked at 9miles barefoot in a week, and felt I needed to slow the training down a bit.

                      I really enjoy running barefoot. It is amazing to me that people feel the need to post that they like wearing shoes. We know. We see your feet.

                      I have been getting some sore spots / blisters on some runs, but I consider this part of the training I planned on. Having avoided the VFF $100 or more investment, I cant blame any company if this doesnt work out for me. Nor do I feel dumb for having paid to try something. On the other end, I did recently (2 months ago) spend $120 on some sneakers. They are very cushioned. (They were recommended by the shoe shoe SALESman) I dislike these shoes very much. I feel that my form is worse. However, Im not ready to give them away. I have used them on a couple of runs these past 2 months, but mostly I use them as recovery shoes. When my feet are especially sore, I wear them and forget about the sore spots.

                       

                      I wish all well on their attempts to go barefoot. I had hoped that this forum would be a great place to trade tips and experience, but unfortunately, many people think that their "one and done" story needs to be posted on here. Even more amazing are the negative Nancies who wont even try running barefoot, but want to tell us all about their opinion.

                       

                      Sorry for posting my "one and done" personal opinion and mentioning that I like to wear shoes still. We don't all have to have the same opinion or experience as you. I thought I was replying in a nice honest manner to your thread where you posed this question: "Anyway- Lets talk. Have you tried Barefeet? Are you still doing it? What do you love about it? If you stopped, what do you blame?"

                      I did close with "More power to you if you like running barefoot, but it's just not for me."  Not exactly an attack on people who like to barefoot is it?

                      Runner's High® - Endurance Nutrition

                      www.runnershighnutrition.com

                      mrmky


                        I've tried it a couple times, always too impatient t work through blisters from not transitioning slowly enough. I did change from heel striking to mid/forefoot strike which got rid of my sore knees and shin splints. I also increased my cadence to ~185 and shortened my stride. I run in shoes w much less cushioning now and have become a much quieter runner. I will probably try again in the fall and spring when when running surfaces are not at such extreme temps.

                          I am into week 5 of barefoot running.

                           

                          I am running less than my normal weekly average. I was up to about 35-45 mpw, but lately have been doing about 20-25.

                          I am running around 25% barefoot. I peaked at 9miles barefoot in a week, and felt I needed to slow the training down a bit.

                          I really enjoy running barefoot. It is amazing to me that people feel the need to post that they like wearing shoes. We know. We see your feet.

                          I have been getting some sore spots / blisters on some runs, but I consider this part of the training I planned on. Having avoided the VFF $100 or more investment, I cant blame any company if this doesnt work out for me. Nor do I feel dumb for having paid to try something. On the other end, I did recently (2 months ago) spend $120 on some sneakers. They are very cushioned. (They were recommended by the shoe shoe SALESman) I dislike these shoes very much. I feel that my form is worse. However, Im not ready to give them away. I have used them on a couple of runs these past 2 months, but mostly I use them as recovery shoes. When my feet are especially sore, I wear them and forget about the sore spots.

                           

                          I wish all well on their attempts to go barefoot. I had hoped that this forum would be a great place to trade tips and experience, but unfortunately, many people think that their "one and done" story needs to be posted on here. Even more amazing are the negative Nancies who wont even try running barefoot, but want to tell us all about their opinion.

                           

                          You want to only hear thoughts, opinions, and stories that agree with yours? You could always take your ball and go home. Or, you could entertain the pros and cons of barefoot running. But if you start a thread on a controversial subject, you have to expect differing views.

                            Barefoot running was a great way for me to break my over-striding, heel-stomping running pattern.

                            You're not going to stomp on your heels if you're barefoot.

                             

                            It's good that it worked for you but barefoot running on its own won't always cure over striding.

                             

                            Barefoot runners are like everyone else--if they were born in raised in western cultures then there is a high likelihood they've spent too much of their lives sitting. 80% will have tight hip flexors which prevent them from getting full hip extension. This causes a whole series of things to happen the net of which is they over stride and land with their foot too far in front of their center of mass.

                             

                            As you point out, you're (probably) not going to stomp on your heels if you're barefoot, so a lot of barefoot runners figure out how land lighter on their feet even while over striding. We've all seen them--they are the ones who look like they're prancing. They are lowering their loading rates, but at a huge cost in efficiency.

                             

                            I think whether you run barefoot all of the time, some of the time, or none of the time, it's best to figure out the root cause of your over striding and work on correcting it or you're bound to have problems eventually.

                            Runners run.

                              Spot on, MM.

                               

                              The only thing I would add is that if you learn to run barefoot, you can use your feet to help adjust your form. It's not something that happens passively, regardless of footwear. You have to work at it.

                               

                               

                              It's good that it worked for you but barefoot running on its own won't always cure over striding.

                               

                              Barefoot runners are like everyone else--if they were born in raised in western cultures then there is a high likelihood they've spent too much of their lives sitting. 80% will have tight hip flexors which prevent them from getting full hip extension. This causes a whole series of things to happen the net of which is they over stride and land with their foot too far in front of their center of mass.

                               

                              As you point out, you're (probably) not going to stomp on your heels if you're barefoot, so a lot of barefoot runners figure out how land lighter on their feet even while over striding. We've all seen them--they are the ones who look like they're prancing. They are lowering their loading rates, but at a huge cost in efficiency.

                               

                              I think whether you run barefoot all of the time, some of the time, or none of the time, it's best to figure out the root cause of your over striding and work on correcting it or you're bound to have problems eventually.

                                The only thing I would add is that if you learn to run barefoot, you can use your feet to help adjust your form. It's not something that happens passively, regardless of footwear. You have to work at it.

                                 

                                Definitely. Even though good form might not start with the foot, the bare foot provides a ton of information if you know how to listen to it. I also think that the skills you learn barefoot can be valuable even when running in shoes, even though shoes dull your senses somewhat. I don't consider myself a barefoot runner but I do consider barefoot drills--some running and some non-running--important tools in my training bag.

                                Runners run.