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Best way to defeat plantar fasciitis (Read 122 times)


Train SMART

     

    H-Wave sounds good but after looking at this https://www.h-wave.com/store/h-wave-h4-device-programs/ it's more than I can afford right now.

     

    H-Wave is a recovery and rehab tool you have the rest of your life and a go to any minute of the day in comfort of your home. It is also an amazing work out recovery tool. I recover at least 2-3 times faster from my hard runs and races. It is so obvious. It also treats pain on demand and injuries on demand. I have great success treating PF, achilles, hammys, Knee stuff etc. The goal is to get your body back to homeostasis and back to its amazing ability to heal. We create the obstacles that slow the process...my goal is to eliminate the obstacles and generally one can heal/recover 2 - 4 times faster. Virtually no soft tissue injury should take 6 months to heal. If it does, you are doing something wrong. I hear you on cost but we all spend money on what is important to us.  Those are the facts. I do have a 40% discount code (65040) that I offer athletes and patient which includes my expertise and protocol set up for injuries, post op and recovery.

    THE RECOVERY MAN. Run Injury Free. www.smartapproachtraining.com

      I forgot to mention that I used a LaCrosse ball to roll my foot on at my desk. Hurt like hell the first few times. I don't know if that's a good or bad thing.

      55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

        I had PF twice.

        Like several people said here, time is the only sure fire remedy. The fascia is messed up, and the area heals very slowly, but if you don't continue damaging it, it should heal. Takes about 6 months.

        I ran through mine both times, tentatively, doing what i could. Which generally meant cutting out the long run and laying off speed work, but i was able to run my usual schedule, and i played it by feel each time.

        I had to alter my stride so i was not a fore-foot runner while it healed. And when i had a similar achilles tendon injury, it took many months after healing until i could run aggressively like i do on the forefoot.

        The guiding principals i learned regarding PF is this:

        1) footwear is key. I simply could not run in lightweight, unsupportive running shoes more than maybe once or twice a week at the very most.

        2) strengthening - i would only get PF when i was weakened significantly due to over use. Once you are on the mends, you simply have to take prevention very seriously and do the strengthening exercises.

        3) Mobility is your friend. Don't let yourself get too tight esp. when doing a lot of volume or speed work. Both mobility and strengthening are for the whole drive train, not just the foot/achilles. One tight or weak area puts undue stress on other areas.

        Take it easy and run it out, reduced intensity. Concentrate on a balanced stride and don't limp or shorten your stride. If you can't withstand a certain stride, then slow down or shorten your workout. THis is a re-building time and best to think of it that way.

        Ultimately, i don't think getting PF for me was a mistake. It was something i had to learn, and it made me a better runner. Honestly, as a masters runner, working through these setbacks has prepared me well for life of running, and I don't think i could continue running as much as i do at this age without working through the challenge of overcoming physical limitations and injuries, and knowing what to look for to avoid subsequent injuries and down time.

        I understand where you're coming from.  This isn't the first time I've had PF, it's just the most frustrating time I can remember.  Seems like I always get injured during the best time of year too, since I prefer running in the heat versus cold here in Chicagoland.   Like anybody else though I become inpatient and look for fast food service.  Before this the ball of my foot was killing me.  I found a good pair of shoes made by Skechers in that case that got rid of the pain. I was disappointed that they quit making them too.  The front of those shoes was incredibly well padded and made a night and day difference.

          I understand where you're coming from.  This isn't the first time I've had PF, it's just the most frustrating time I can remember.  Seems like I always get injured during the best time of year too, since I prefer running in the heat versus cold here in Chicagoland.   Like anybody else though I become inpatient and look for fast food service.  Before this the ball of my foot was killing me.  I found a good pair of shoes made by Skechers in that case that got rid of the pain. I was disappointed that they quit making them too.  The front of those shoes was incredibly well padded and made a night and day difference.

           

          I use a roller myself.  That's similar to this foot roller


          Train SMART

            I think rolling is fine but just be careful.... grinding on non healthy tissue can be counter productive. Here is an analgy. You have a cut on your leg that is slow to heal. Would you knead and rub on it hard all the time? Would that help healing? Also remember that the Plantar Fascia acts like a ligament. A ligament connects bone to bone. The plantar fascta connects heel bone to metatarsal bones. When you sprain an ankle do you ever hear of any one telling you to stretch a sprained ankle or grind on the ligaments of a sprained ankle to heal faster. I get sooo frustrated in the management of this condition. When I tell patients to STOP doing things that delay the process of healing they start getting better. It is so common sense to me. We keep doing things that slow the process.

            THE RECOVERY MAN. Run Injury Free. www.smartapproachtraining.com

              Support insoles did the trick for me. But it wasn't until I started wearing them in every shoe running or otherwise for a period of 3 weeks that the searing pain in my heel and arch started subsiding. That also came months after trying everything else and being at my wits end and desperate. YMMV

               

              Kind of the same for me.   I dealt with the PF curse for about 2 years and nothing seemed to work..   One day in CVS I saw some soft half shoe inserts for PF and bought them (think they were $6 or $8).     I started wearing them in my everyday shoes not my running shoes and the PF cleared up in about a week and never has it come back.    I still wear soft heel inserts in my day to day shoes...

              Champions are made when no one is watching

                Today I went for a 3.40 miles test run wearing my Strutz which I started using yesterday.  I also took 1 prescription strength Naproxen too.  I did feel a little pain during my first mile but after that I started to feel fine.  I thought 3 miles would be a safe distance, since I usually run a lot further than that. I got some new compression socks now and a gel pack made specifically to wrap around my foot (see pics below)  I've been doing  battle with Plantar Fascitis for longer than I can remember now, so I'm just going to take it 1 day at a time and try to find some new weapons to kill the  SOB with. 

                teileen


                  I’ve had PF once that lasted about 18 months. It slowly went away with the right shoes for me. At the time it was the Nike Vomero 3s. Very cushy. I haven’t had a full on recurrence since then but I wear Oofos recovery Flip flops whenever I’m not wearing my running shoes (made easier by WFH).  They are amazing. Highly recommend adding them to your arsenal if you haven’t already.

                  Est. 2006

                  wolvmar


                  Depressing...

                    Support insoles did the trick for me. But it wasn't until I started wearing them in every shoe running or otherwise for a period of 3 weeks that the searing pain in my heel and arch started subsiding. That also came months after trying everything else and being at my wits end and desperate. YMMV

                     

                    same for me.  and some benefit form the sock thing you wear at night, especially if used at the first signs of PF.

                      I’ve had PF once that lasted about 18 months. It slowly went away with the right shoes for me. At the time it was the Nike Vomero 3s. Very cushy. I haven’t had a full on recurrence since then but I wear Oofos recovery Flip flops whenever I’m not wearing my running shoes (made easier by WFH).  They are amazing. Highly recommend adding them to your arsenal if you haven’t already.

                       

                      I understand how shoes can make a difference.  Last year I had really bad pain in the ball of my foot.  I bought some Skechers Go Run shoes that were incredibly soft and gave my foot no problems.  They really did the trick.

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