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I hate to lose (Read 199 times)


Dad of a real runner

    I hate to lose.

    I’m OK with being beaten, when others clearly have more talent or just have more that day.  But it is bothersome when I lose because I did not put myself in a position to win.  In a 10K today I finished 2nd in my age group by 11 seconds (11 SECONDS).  I didn’t even know my competition was that close in front.  I had never raced against this gentleman before, but I saw he was registered and I had checked some of his times and knew that it would take a good effort on my part to beat him.  The problem was I had no idea what he looked like.  My intention was to check bib numbers before the race so I would at least have a chance to id him.  But did I?  NOOOO!.  If I had I would have kept him in sight.  Did I have 11 seconds to get?  Yes, 11 seconds is just a normal mental slip in the middle of the race, and I dogged the last half mile up hill.  If I had made up the 11 seconds would I have finished first?  Don’t know, but at least then I would have made him beat me.

     

    Oh well, this should probably be on the Rants page – thanks for listening.

      That's the trouble with age group stuff if you're racing for a place in your category - very often you have no idea who you're actually racing against. I basically do every race as a time trial - aiming for even pacing according what I think I should be able to do on the day, and then try extra hard in the last few hundred metres to take every place I can - whether people look like they might be in my age group or not.

      vegefrog


        I hate to lose.

          The problem was I had no idea what he looked like. 

        Its a race. The problem was, if as you say you had those 11 seconds to give, that you didn't give it your all. You should be giving 100% all the time or you shouldn't be satisfied with your performance. At least that's what they say...

         

        I won first in my AG today, but just missed 3rd overall female by 7 seconds.  I saw the girl in front of me. I had given it all I had and couldn't catch her so it didn't bother me too much. Too many races I have said "If only I KNEW that girl was in my AG I would have tried harder to beat her". Then I realized, that is a really backwards ass way to approach racing. Now I don't worry about what the others are doing I just try to have the best race I can possibly have and that usually works out pretty well.

         

        Was there $$ involved in your race? I had no idea people actually checked others bib numbers and looked up times of other racers.


        Dad of a real runner

          Its a race. The problem was, if as you say you had those 11 seconds to give, that you didn't give it your all. You should be giving 100% all the time or you shouldn't be satisfied with your performance. At least that's what they say...

           

          I won first in my AG today, but just missed 3rd overall female by 7 seconds.  I saw the girl in front of me. I had given it all I had and couldn't catch her so it didn't bother me too much. Too many races I have said "If only I KNEW that girl was in my AG I would have tried harder to beat her". Then I realized, that is a really backwards ass way to approach racing. Now I don't worry about what the others are doing I just try to have the best race I can possibly have and that usually works out pretty well.

           

          Was there $$ involved in your race? I had no idea people actually checked others bib numbers and looked up times of other racers.

           

          Agree completely.  Nope, didn't give it my all.  It was a 32 second PR, but I could have run faster.  That's partially why it bothers me.  Nah, no money involved, and the only reason I thought about the bib was I had seen this gentlemen's name in the registered list and knew he had times that I was hoping to hit.

            Suppose you did know this man was your chief competition, then sprint finished past him. Did he know you were his chief competition ? Unless he did, your victory would have a major asterix. Which is what I think of age group awards in the first place for reasons illustrated in this thread.

              I felt the same way you did on occasion in the past, but only in the military races at the bases.  I kept getting 4th in the 38-44 age group, and it was driving me nuts.  I wanted a 3rd or better, at least once, and one of those nice modern trophies that some of the military races give out.   I finally got in a position one day on a perfect day and got First in AG, so now I don't have to worry about it anymore.  Done it once, and once was enough.   ---Still go for AG awards, but personal time improvement is more important than placing in AG now.

               

              But on the Bib numbers thing.... I must admit, at some races, I do that as well.  Checking out the competition!  And military races have 'color coded' stickers based on age group, so I know most of the people I am competing against AG wise before race ever starts.  Orange sticker, got to beat that guy!  

              ---- Main thing:  I agree with the above comment about "Run your best possible race, every race!"  Then let the cards fall where they may knowing you did your top performance.

              The Plan (big parts)→  /// April:  Hampton, VA 24 Hour Run for Cancer  ///   May:  3 Days at the Fair (12 Hour)  ///  Nov:  New York Marathon (Staying at the Waldorf Astoria, its a "Bucket List" thing.  Can someone loan me some Zamunda money to help pay for it?)   ∞

              tinman11


                I made a mistake in a recent 5 k where I spoke out loud to the winner as he came back through on his cool down.  What I didn't realize was that  the guy I was gaining on, who placed 1st in my age group to my 2nd, heard me talking and kicked it in gear when he realized how close I was.  He and I talked about this after the race.  I think he beat me buy about 12 seconds.

                 

                The next week I ran a 10 k on the same greenway and I was checking out the other guys in my age group before the start.  There was one guy who jumped far ahead of me but I reeled him in and we raced neck and neck for the final mile.  I ended up beating him by about 7 seconds for 1st in our age group, then officially jumped to 3rd overall (it was a fairly small field for a 10 k).

                 

                As far as knowing your competition, I think that's a great idea.

                 

                The more I race, the more I know about the guys in my age group - and they know me if they're paying attention.  When Tom Sneva drove Indy Cars he was very friendly with all the drivers and teams in the garage throughout the month of May.  Everybody liked him.  Consequently, he knew more about every team's setup, challenges and race strategy than any other driver.

                Nakedbabytoes


                levitation specialist

                  I don't pre-research the race I am doing in question, but unfortunately I am competitive enough that I go out way too fast and hold on for dear life, gauging as other girls pass me, if they are probably in my AG or not. Or in smaller races, just making sure I get 3rd place OA female as they usually stop awarding after that. It almost bit me in the ass the last race though as I thoughts had finally broken the 3rd place curse I put on myself and eeked out a 2nd but when they announced stuff I was 3rd. I was like, "Wut??!!" But then when they announced the first place female it was obvious why I was wrong. She looked very "he-ish" and I had assumed when she passed me that she was a guy.

                  Oops! Well, at least I had aimed high and shot for second or I wouldn't have placed at all!

                   

                  I have no idea if this is a good strategy or not. Do I run faster because I know my placing or do I run slower because I know my placing?

                  I dunno. I would like to just run as fast as I can and see what happens.

                    after your race today, I see a Phat Old Man PR getting much closer to your Absolute PR and you might wanna thank that guy for getting the fire burning a little brighter Wink

                      In a chip timed race, it's pretty hard to make a real AG race out of it unless you and your competition line up together; otherwise, you could be racing someone who's going to cross the finish a minute or more ahead or behind you.  That said, if I see someone who might be in my age group, I make an effort to pass him.  Doesn't guarantee anything, but why not make a game of it.

                      Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                        I like the rare AG placings I get, and yes if I see someone I'm almost certain is in my group just ahead of me it may give me a bit more to fight for.  However, the people I really like to beat are those not-nice at the beginning of the race.  You know the ones that are so completely focused that they forget they aren't the only humans on the planet.  (aka knocking into others when it could be avoided, spitting randomly, jumping up and down when it's extremely crowded and almost squashing others).  Thankfully they aren't that common.  Another 'group' I like to beat are the guys I know will get extremely ticked at being "chicked".  I pushed for my 10k PR because of someone like that Wink

                         

                        MTA:  I completely agree with the sentiment of giving it your all though.  I would like to say I always give 100% no matter who I am racing against, but I can't honestly say that.  I'm human and competitive.

                        'No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch'

                         

                        "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'"  - Peter Maher

                         

                        "Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it's hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clearheadedness that follow a long run."  -Monte Davis


                        Dad of a real runner

                          after your race today, I see a Phat Old Man PR getting much closer to your Absolute PR and you might wanna thank that guy for getting the fire burning a little brighter Wink

                           

                          Oh, you bet.  The competition is what keeps me going - whether it is to compete against myself and continue to improve, or to compete against others.  An interesting note in this particular race was the third place finisher in our age group.  This gentleman was regularly finishing ahead of me three years ago - yesterday he was almost two minutes back.  Nice to see what marathon training does for your 10K times.