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Marathon advice needed (Read 639 times)

    Hello all, first post here, and I think its going to be a long one, so feel free to read and advise, or just ignore as you please.

     

    I usually just bike, and run sporadically through the winter. However, last winter I got a bit more serious about running, and decided to actually train for my first 10K in 20 years. The 10K by spring goal turned into 2 8Ks, a 10K, and two HMs. I felt real good about the first HM, and signed up for a full marathon this coming November. No problems at all until the last taper run before the second HM, when I tweaked my left hamstring. Like an idiot, I decided to go ahead and run. Did a compression wrap, changed my stride to much more of a forefoot plant than my normal midfoot, went to 1/4 mile splits with 60 second walks and got through the run with minimal discomfort. Took the next week off and started back slowly after that. The hamstring actually felt about the same after the race as before, but there was some strain on the opposing leg.

     

    After my week off, I started back slow, and after a week or so, the hamstring felt great. But, in the process, I have picked up a calf issue on the opposing leg.  I kept my miles down, and with stretching and stick massage, the calf started to get better. Then I had an ankle twist that seemed to make the calf much worse.  So, I am now going to take two full weeks off.  No actual pain when I run, but the tightness builds quickly and I don't seem to be able to go past 2 or 3 miles comfortably.  So, two weeks of just walking and stretching, along with using the stick for massage.  I am hoping things will be back to normal then.

     

    Now for the question.  After I start up again, there will only be 20 weeks until my planned OBX marathon.  I had planned originally for a 26 week ramp up similar to some of the galloway schedules, but I do need to readjust now.  Is 20 weeks enough time left?  I think I had enough of a base a few months back for a 20 week schedule, but after the past few weeks of less miles, and now looking at two weeks of downtime, I am starting to have doubts.

     

    Any thoughts or suggestions?  

     

    Thanks, 

     

    John

      Based on your history of tweaks/injuries recently I would not recommend doing the marathon. You need to build up your running structure to withstand the pounding. You may have been doing a bit much the way it is. You are just not there yet. Now you are talking about doing a 26 week program in 20 weeks and you are not even healthy. Take your time. Get healed. Do some base building and then shoot for another half marathon in the Fall. If all goes smoothly, then find a full down the road.

      Those who try, fail! Those who do what it takes to succeed, succeed!!

      Shoe


        Hello all, first post here, and I think its going to be a long one, so feel free to read and advise, or just ignore as you please.

         

        I usually just bike, and run sporadically through the winter. However, last winter I got a bit more serious about running, and decided to actually train for my first 10K in 20 years. The 10K by spring goal turned into 2 8Ks, a 10K, and two HMs. I felt real good about the first HM, and signed up for a full marathon this coming November. No problems at all until the last taper run before the second HM, when I tweaked my left hamstring. Like an idiot, I decided to go ahead and run. Did a compression wrap, changed my stride to much more of a forefoot plant than my normal midfoot, went to 1/4 mile splits with 60 second walks and got through the run with minimal discomfort. Took the next week off and started back slowly after that. The hamstring actually felt about the same after the race as before, but there was some strain on the opposing leg.

         

        After my week off, I started back slow, and after a week or so, the hamstring felt great. But, in the process, I have picked up a calf issue on the opposing leg.  I kept my miles down, and with stretching and stick massage, the calf started to get better. Then I had an ankle twist that seemed to make the calf much worse.  So, I am now going to take two full weeks off.  No actual pain when I run, but the tightness builds quickly and I don't seem to be able to go past 2 or 3 miles comfortably.  So, two weeks of just walking and stretching, along with using the stick for massage.  I am hoping things will be back to normal then.

         

        Now for the question.  After I start up again, there will only be 20 weeks until my planned OBX marathon.  I had planned originally for a 26 week ramp up similar to some of the galloway schedules, but I do need to readjust now.  Is 20 weeks enough time left?  I think I had enough of a base a few months back for a 20 week schedule, but after the past few weeks of less miles, and now looking at two weeks of downtime, I am starting to have doubts.

         

        Any thoughts or suggestions?  

         

        Thanks, 

         

        John

         

        I think it would be possible to ramp up and finish a marathon but you and your body might be happier waiting for a better base as a starting period.  It looks like you've only been running 10-15 miles in an entire week, and that's before any downtime.  It will be hard on your body to ramp that up quickly, especially with some injury history already.  So, if this one was just very special for some reason, I'd say it is possible but I'd really advise picking another marathon, or OBX next year, and enjoying the journey a little.... because that probably will be much more enjoyable with less physical and emotional stress, and lower risk of injury.

          is there a HM at obx that you could switch to?   if possible that is what I would recommend.  that would take alot of stress off mentally & physically during training.   like the others have said, try to build a more consistent, longer term base that is injury free before attempting a full. 

            Hi John,

             

            I just wanted to state the obvious: you probably have a great engine from all the cycling, but your (lower) body just isn't yet fully acclimated to distance running.  That's the likely source of your injuries right now, made even worse because your cardiovascular fitness tempts you into workouts bigger than your structure can tolerate right now.  Getting there just takes time and miles.

            “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

              Hi John,

               

              I just wanted to state the obvious: you probably have a great engine from all the cycling, but your (lower) body just isn't yet fully acclimated to distance running.  That's the likely source of your injuries right now, made even worse because your cardiovascular fitness tempts you into workouts bigger than your structure can tolerate right now.  Getting there just takes time and miles.

               

              Yep.

              Runners run.