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Target race times (Read 483 times)

cnlifeasitis


    Hiya Im starting to train for a 10K race and wanted to find out what a 'good' target time to aim for would be and if there is a sort of table based on kilometres or race type for such a thing. Im thinking along the horizontal showing race lengh/type and the vertical showing the age brackets/ sex etc. Any thoughts?
    If you always do what you have always done, you will always get what you have always got
      I don't really think there are tables like that. There are just too many factors besides age/sex that go into figuring out a target time if you've never ran a 10k before such as running background, fitness level, weight, health status, etc. Think about how different the target times would be for a 30 year old male who has been training for 10 years versus a 30 year old obese male that has never run before. What is your running background? What type of mileage do you do? Have you run any other races?
      The point is you see, that there is no point in driving yourself mad trying to stop yourself going mad. You might as well give in and save your sanity for later.


      Gandalf the Grey

        Hi Most race-time predictors work by using your time from a recent race (there are too many factors to have a simple table). This is not an exact science and does depend on the necessary training to be in place. This one has worked quite well for me (but I would not suggest getting a full marathon time based on your time for 1 mile though!). http://www.runnersworld.co.uk/news/article.asp?UAN=1681 Good luck with your race, but most of all, enjoy it! Neil

        Running ... just keep running!
        Fancy a holiday running in the French Alps?

          I don't really recommend that you approach your race target this way. You really should set your goals based on your fitness levels and your training, rather than trying to hit some objective standard of a "good" "beginner's" time, which doesn't exist anyway. You should go into your first race just seeking to do your best, and then allow the time you achieve to help you frame your future goals Having said all that .... If you use this calculator you can get some idea of how a given race time ranks among the average times for all persons of the same age/sex. Enter your age and gender, and put in a percentile number for the "age-graded performance." If you put in 50%, for example, it will show you the median times for runners of your age and your gender at that distance ( i.e., 50% of people will be faster, 50% will be slower). Note: this is not a beginner's ranking -- this compares you to the average of all runners of the same age/gender.
          How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.
            You say that you're starting to train for a 10K --- does this mean you just started running, or have run lots of 5Ks, or ... ? The length of time you've been running, your fitness level, height, weight, age, V02 max, weather conditions, hills, etc ... all factor into your race time. If you just started running, then your goal should be to enjoy the race and finish it strong Smile
            2009: BQ?
            cnlifeasitis


              Well I was going to start by entering a 5K but on Sunday I went for a leisurely run wherever my feet took me and when I came back home I plotted the route and it turned out to be just over 10K. Im 22 and did the jog in 55 minutes but it was just casual running, which is why I was curious about a 'target time'. If 55 minutes is 'ok' then I can have an aim to build upon. I been running since September as a means to destress from my business. Run pretty much every day (bit bad I know lol, but what can you say I enjoy running), but only recently began to take it seriously and time my runs. I know people say 'dont run before you can walk' but hey 'if u can run, why not'.
              If you always do what you have always done, you will always get what you have always got
                Based off of a 55 minute "10K jog" I would say aim for around 45-50 mintues. However, I'm not really sure how much that jog took out of you and what your mileage is like, so take that with a grain of salt. Mostly, just use that first race as an experience builder to know of what you are capable. As for running everyday there's nothing wrong with that. Just be smart and know when to take is easy/take a day off if you feel you need it. One day off now to let your body heal is better than 6 weeks off because you let yourself get injured.
                The point is you see, that there is no point in driving yourself mad trying to stop yourself going mad. You might as well give in and save your sanity for later.