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Flat foot plant (Read 1052 times)

    I just started running and am training for a 15k in 10 weeks. I used to do power walking at work @ 3.2 miles a day. I notice that at times during the walk that my right foot when I get tired tends to land flat. Today I noticed that my foot tents to land toward the ball of my foot which leads to some pain in the lower shin of the right leg. And this causes my left knee to hurt as I fiugre I am favoring my righ leg a little. I also notice that my right food doesn't want to extend as it should for the proper foot plant. Any ideas out there on hwat I can do about it?

    To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire

      Do you have an old injury that might be affecting the way you walk/run? I had ACL reconstruction around 2 years ago and have found that I limp a bit when I'm tired. I also learned the hard way this year that limping is hard on the body in other ways! My best suggestion for you right now would be to cut back on both the intensity and the duration of your running until you find something you can do WITHOUT having one foot land funny and/or limping. Stay there for a while, and then gradually work up, no more that 10% increase / wk AND using your change of gait as a "stop" signal. It should gradually get better and should keep you from getting hurt. It's frustrating not to be able to run what you want, yes. But if what you're doing causes you an injury (as it probably will if you keep it up!) it'll keep you from running AT ALL until it heals. Do yourself a favor and keep it to what your body can handle at this point. There's a chance you might not be ready for a 15K in 10 weeks. But there's an even greater chance that if you ignore the signals your body is giving you - AND THIS IS A SIGNAL! - you'll end up hurt even worse. And that'll keep you from running your 15K too. Most people I know who are just starting running shoot for a 5K in about 3 - 4 months. That's one third the distance in half again as much time. You might want to consider adjusting your goals, espeially because it sounds like your feet and legs aren't ready for training for a 15K. I know that's a hard thing to hear, but it's important to learn to listen to what your body's telling you. It's the path to a long, happy running career, which I wish for you. Janell

      Roads were made for journeys...

        Thanks. I noticed it about two years ago while walking. I'd power walk the hall, I work at the DFAS, (Defense Finance Accounting Service,) building in Indy. the only building in DoD that is bigger is that spare sided one in DC. The hall loops around and is .4 miles. I would do 4 laps twice a day. Sometimes I would notice that I could hear my right foot sorta plop down and I would find myself thinking HEAL-Toe, HEAL-toe and things would be fine for several weeks then bam! The problems would come back. Today after my run I find myself walking around the house making sure HEAL then toe!! I just can't seem to do things the normal way!! If there is the wrong way to start out I'll find it!! Power on stall practice from flight school STILL 11 years later scares the crap out of me. I did 2 in a row wrong while solo once!! The very thought causes the pucker factor to go off scale!!!! Say I just remembered several years ago I really messed up my hamstring on my right leg, I mean I was black and blue from the back of my knee to my butt. Hurt like hell for weeks!! So I think that when my leg gets tired the hamstring is not extending my leg out far enough when I bring it fwd. More Streching before and after runs should help. Anyone know more streches that might help?

        To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire

          I don't know much about stretching for injuries, but I bet you could Google some good results. I think you'll be able to tell pretty easily if there's a large difference between the flexibility on your right and left sides. Just be careful when stretching too - it's possible to over-do it and hurt yourself stretching too! (I know, sounds like a no-win situation!) Be gentle with yourself. Don't bounce. Don't force. Be consistant - every day, GENTLE, holding for a good while (like 30+ seconds) and you should see improvement. Good luck!

          Roads were made for journeys...

            Wingz, Today I am not even sure about the 5K in just over 9 weeks. I did some streching after the run and that seemed to help this morning with lots less pain and stiffness. And I think running in this hilly area to start out is not a good idea

            To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire

            Mile Collector


            Abs of Flabs

              Today after my run I find myself walking around the house making sure HEAL then toe!!
              That comment got me thinking... If you have to consciously remind yourself to do that, maybe it's more than a hamstring issue. Could it be that your calf muscles are too tight, and your shin muscles are not strong enough to pull your foot up before you land for the proper heel strike? When I get shin splints, my foot just flops onto the ground, similar to what you're describing.
                It's not actually natural to land heel-toe. If you didn't wear shoes you would land on the ball of your foot, then quickly transition to a flat-footed position momentarilly before pushing off the ball of your foot again. Most people also don't strike the ground identically with both feet. This is normal. The soreness in your shins is likely due to being new to running, not anything wrong with your mechanics. Its very normal to have some tenderness in the lower shins (and lots of other places) when you start a running regimen. This should abate the more you run as your connective tissues and muscles in your lower leg get stronger. Take it slow, try to do as much of your running on soft surfaces at first until you build up strength. Even if you have to run laps around a grass soccer field.

                Runners run.

                  Mikeymike, I have been wondering if I am over thinking this and from your post it seems I may have. I tend to do that with new things. I have found a nice park to run in. About 1.25 to 1.5 a lap. I think I'll start at a fast walk and work up. Also on Sat I'll check out the local Running Club and run with them. While the internet is a great place to get answers I think some one actually watching me run will be a huge help too.

                  To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire

                    Starflight, keep in mind that you've known how to run since you were 2 years old. Nobody had to teach you how to do it--you just one day wanted to get someplace faster than you could walk and *voila* you were running. Your body knows the best way to do this and--even if you haven't run in a long time--it will remember. A LOT of people who've never run regularly tend to over think things when they are starting out. Running message boards are filled with the psychobabble of runners with 2 weeks more experience than other runners doling out advice on the latest and greatest "methods" of running; chi running, the pose method, yada, yada. There is an entire industry churning out books, articles, DVDs, giving seminars and charging money for online advice to capitalize on people's insecurity and tendency to over think this most basic of activities. Ignore it all. You know how to run--this is absolutely the simplest sport on earth. The most important thing is to be able to manage the little aches, pains, bad days and setbacks that you will inevitably encounter as you are getting started and to get past those so that running can become a habit--something you do without even thinking about it and something you can't live without. Most people give in way before they ever reach that point. Be one of the fortunate ones who doesn't.

                    Runners run.

                    vicentefrijole


                      Nobody had to teach you how to do it--you just one day wanted to get someplace faster than you could walk and *voila* you were running. Your body knows the best way to do this and--even if you haven't run in a long time--it will remember.
                      I totally agree with what mikeymike is saying. On a similar note, I've noticed in my own running that the first 5 to 10 minutes of most runs often feels really wierd (tight, uncoordinated, not smooth, overly self-conscious). As I get warmed up, my mind goes elsewhere, I stop paying attention to each step, and then everything falls into place (sort of like 'seeing the forest through the trees'?). If I recall, when I first started running, it took a long time to get into this "comfort zone". Big grin And stretching a little bit (gently) about 5 minutes into my run helps me loosen up and get there faster. I suspect as you continue to gain strength in your running, you will notice each step a lot less.
                        Mikeymike, I think you really said a mouthful there!! I cut my initial 2 miles down to 1 mile and just ran and enjoyed it. And I notice that my foot plant was better and it took longer for the plop to show up. 2 miles for a 52 year old beginner was too much. Better to ease into it and enjoy it, than struggle and end up giving up altogether! 20 months ago I was just south of 300 lbs on blood pressure medication and just told I have diabetes. Today I am off the meds with normal blood pressure and great control of the diabetes. AND I hav lost a few lbs. I am down to 230 headed for 190. BTW I am hooked on running!! What habit can hook you and make you feel better, bring you blood pressure under control AND your BG (Blood Glucose) and do so all without medication? Walking and running can!! Better than a shot in the gut twice a day!!!

                        To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire

                          Way to go, Starflight! Sounds like you've found the solution to your problem and are well on your way towards enjoying a lifelong running habit! Smile Enjoy!

                          Roads were made for journeys...

                            Ran with the local club this morning. Did 1.29 miles and ran further for a longer time. I am going to join next week. One runner even held back with me until I needed to walk a little. Very helpfull!! And very supportive. Oh! And I sound like that Rino in Jumanji, you know the one always brining up the rear of the stampeed! BTW Mikeymike the guy that paced me for a while plopped BOTH feet

                            To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire

                              There are several schools of thought on the footstrike issue. Some say that it is the "natural" gait of ALL runners to run mid-foot/forefoot first and that it's the evil shoe companies which have ruined everyone's natural stride. Others say that it varies from person and that you shouldn't try to foce a change from whatever's YOUR natural footstrike. Still others say that your footstrike will change naturally as you evolve as a runner. ::shrug:: My take on it is if it hurts, you're doing something wrong. I'm a heel-striking shuffler of a runner right now. A few months ago I tried to switch to a midfoot strike on the theory that it would help prevent injuries. I started hurting within a few days, and started having nagging little aches and pains that I hadn't had before. I went back to my "natural" heel-strike and they went away. I decided that if something was supposed to prevent injuries and it was causing them, then it wasn't a good solution for me. Wink Not saying it won't work for others. Just not for me right now.

                              Roads were made for journeys...

                                Well I amd just going to forget the foot plant and run! Today I got home from work and it was the first day under 80 degree. It was 77 at 5 pm which is 2 degree less than tihe temp at 5:30 AM today and the humidity was managable so for the first time since last week end I ran. But this time I ran heart rate instead of time and actually did better than ever. The only real problem was shin pain. Been there done that before and know that as I build everyting up as when walking it will get better and moving through the pain seems to work. Maybe running will get me through it faster.

                                To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire

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