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Voluntary time off. (Read 920 times)


Slow-smooth-fast

    I have been so obsessed lately with my diet and running regime that it seems to be taking over. Over the weekend I let my hair down and enjoyed some nice, but fatty foods. I feel that my body has been craving them lately. With that said I believe that I need some time off the hardcore routine I have been following, so I have decided to let my hair down for a week, even a week off running. This will also help iron out the niggling pains I have been getting lately in various parts of my body. Does anyone else agree that it is good to sometimes have a break, and shock the system so to speak?

    "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009


    Needs more cowbell!

      Does anyone else agree that it is good to sometimes have a break, and shock the system so to speak?
      Definitely! Sounds like your body is craving a little vacation--it's good to listen BEFORE you find yourself injured. You've done so well...I have no doubt that you will jump back on the wagon once you've had a little laid-back time. Smile k

      Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

      '14 Goals:

      • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

      • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

        I completely agree that we all need a break from the repetition once in a while. The only thing that I may suggest is that instead of taking time off entirely, vary the routine. Get in some cross training for a little while and stay away from running if that is what you need to do to get refreshed mentally and physically.
        "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty, and well preserved body, but rather, to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming: "WOW... WHAT A RIDE!!!" Muskingum College XC


        Slow-smooth-fast

          thanks for the encouragement, see you all in a week. Wink

          "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009


          Kill

            I have been so obsessed lately with my diet and running regime that it seems to be taking over. Over the weekend I let my hair down and enjoyed some nice, but fatty foods. I feel that my body has been craving them lately. With that said I believe that I need some time off the hardcore routine I have been following, so I have decided to let my hair down for a week, even a week off running. This will also help iron out the niggling pains I have been getting lately in various parts of my body. Does anyone else agree that it is good to sometimes have a break, and shock the system so to speak?
            I think it's a good idea, Eddy. I took 8-9 days off over vacation and almost all of my little aches and pains disappeared.

            Passion is a rather frightening thing because if you have passion you don't know where it will take you.

             

            When it’s all said and done, will you have said more than you’ve done?

              Better to take some voluntary time off to recharge the batteries, rather than being forced into involuntary time off due to over doing it. But Eddy, didn't you just post a couple of hours earlier that you wanted to run 22 miles the next day? What happened to that?


              Slow-smooth-fast

                Better to take some voluntary time off to recharge the batteries, rather than being forced into involuntary time off due to over doing it. But Eddy, didn't you just post a couple of hours earlier that you wanted to run 22 miles the next day? What happened to that?
                What happened to that was the chocolate bars and crisps. also the cans of lager last night. Seriously, I have been giving myself such a hard time lately, so a break is what I need.

                "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

                  i completely agree. i ended up giving myself several weeks off this summer-- my schedule was NUTS, i wasn't sleeping or eating enough as it was, and trying to get my runs in was adding to my stress rather than relieving it. and my knee was being a brat-- probably b/c of stress-related muscle tension throwing my movement off, as well as lack of sleep and proper nutrition throwing a wrench in everything physical. and now i feel much better, and am ready to get back in there all refreshed and feeling good! actually, this makes me think of something: somewhere on some running forum (coolrunning? or runners world), someone asked "short of injury, how do you know you're overtraining/overdoing it?" and someone else answered, "when i start getting cranky with my wife, who is the most wonderful woman in the world, i force myself to take a rest." it's good advice. when i start getting frustrated with myself or my loved ones beyond expectations, it's time to change what i'm doing.