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5K Speed/Interval Training Advice (Read 59 times)

    You're running 16 miles per week? Forgot all of this other stuff. If you want to run a successful 5k, you need to get your mileage to 30 mpw (at the minimum that is). That alone is going to make a huge difference in your times. No matter what workouts you do, you will not see that many gains if you running under 20 mpw.

     

    I totally get the additional mileage, but it just wouldn't work for me at this point. My goal was always to see how far (fast) I could get with the training I could do which was the three (sometimes four) days a week and if this is the best I can do, I'm fine with it either way. I just really don't have a great understanding of training which explains why any three day plans I could find were for beginners.

     

    I'm probably going to try to do what was suggested with running the 7:15 first mile then just blindly seeing what i can do in the last two as that is just something so different than what I've been doing the past four years. That and I'll try the different intervals and see how that works out, but I do appreciate your response.

     

    Jay

    JMac11


    Milkman

       

      What's the significance of 30? Isn't the minimum mileage needed hightly dependent on the individual and their definition of a successful 5k? Jay wants to run 20:40 and can already run 21:17 despite bad pacing.

       

      Obviously building a bigger aerobic base will improve 5k performance. But hundreds of thousands of high school cross country runners (and this washed up 50+ year old hobby jogger) can easily run a 20:40 off of less than 20 miles per week.

       

       

      I guess I'd add a couple of things here:

       

      1) No, there's no magic number, and there isn't for any race distance honestly. However, there is a minimum. Take longer distances: you can run a marathon off of 30 MPW, no question. You will not run a good one though. Jay here seems like he has run a few 5Ks and is looking to take it to the next level.

       

      2) You're right in that it's "individual". However, Jay specifically said he "hit a wall with my training" and is looking for improvement. If someone was running 40 MPW let's say for a 5K and doing 0 speed work, the answer is obviously to run more intervals, not add more mileage. The opposite is true here.

       

      When you get into the "individual" component is when someone is let's say running 40 MPW for a 5K with one VO2 interval session a week. There, some people will do better bumping that mileage up to 50-60, while others would be better served with more intervals per week or adding a tempo run. That is not the case here: Jay, no matter what, is going to break his "wall" by running more miles per week.

       

      3) Similar to that last sentence, people forget the 5K is at least 80% aerobic (depending on which author/coach you listen to, could be up to 90%). This isn't the 800 meter.

       

      Yes, hundreds of thousands of people run 20:40 off less than 20 miles per week. But you know what? Those people generally are gifted and are also young (there's a reason why the best 5K runners in the world are not in their 30's like marathoners). They opted into running at a young age because they had at least some talent: maybe they ran the mile faster than their classmates, maybe they were fastest on their soccer team or used XC as "base building" for the spring season. You cannot compare that to everyone.

      5K: 16:37 (11/20)  |  10K: 34:49 (10/19)  |  HM: 1:15:00 (10/21)  |  FM: 2:36:31 (12/19) 

       

      Next Race: Unknown 

      JMac11


      Milkman

         

        I totally get the additional mileage, but it just wouldn't work for me at this point. My goal was always to see how far (fast) I could get with the training I could do which was the three (sometimes four) days a week and if this is the best I can do, I'm fine with it either way. I just really don't have a great understanding of training which explains why any three day plans I could find were for beginners.

         

         

         

        And that's totally fine. Most people have their limit on what they're willing to do in terms of training / time spent. If that won't work for you, just recognize you are leaving the single biggest thing that will improve your training. You may not get to your goal time if you are not willing to improve you mileage, and as long as you understand/okay with that, then you can experiment with other stuff to try to squeeze the most you can out of your mileage.

         

        Good luck.

        5K: 16:37 (11/20)  |  10K: 34:49 (10/19)  |  HM: 1:15:00 (10/21)  |  FM: 2:36:31 (12/19) 

         

        Next Race: Unknown 

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