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Carrying dog poop (Read 169 times)

    It's me again, the person with the new dog.

     

    Anyone have any recommendation for a small pack or pouch?  I don't need him to be carrying anything other than his own full poop bags.  All the backpacks I see are these big things, way more than we need.  He wears an Easy-Walk Harness -- is there some sort of pouch that could be attached to that?

     

    I did try a product where you can clip the bag to the leash, but found that just created an annoying poop bag pendulum.

     

    On most runs this isn't a problem; we usually pass a garbage can within a block or two.  But it would be good to have an option, especially on trail runs.  Any recommendations?

     

    He's working out great, by the way, and has been running about 20 miles with me every week.  I'm still working on figuring out when he needs to stop for real, and when he just wants a sniffaround, but he's made great strides on pace and line matching, and ignores more of the bunnies than he used to.

      Do you pick up dog poop in the woods or just make sure it is not on the trail?


      Cheap and Evil Girl

        Sorry, this is off your topic, but you might want to look into a different type of harness than the easy walk.  I recently read an article in Whole Dog Journal about this.

         

        http://www.whole-dog-journal.com/issues/16_7/features/the-no-pull-debate_20782-1.html?zkMobileView=false

         

        an excerpt:

         

        "In a limited gait analysis study, Dr. Zink observed that dogs wearing no-pull, front clip harnesses bore less weight on their front legs than they normally would – even when the harness wasn’t attached to a leash! In addition, the dogs bore less weight on the leg that was on the far side of where the person walked, even when there was no leash attached; when the dog had a leash attached, it was more significant. This suggests to her that the dog was reacting to the presence of the harness against the leg by pushing harder against it. In all cases, the gait of the front limbs was altered whenever the harness was on.

        Dr. Zink explains that these harnesses sit on top of the biceps and supraspinatus tendons, two of the most commonly injured structures in dogs’ forelimbs, particularly in canine athletes. She asserts that, just by logic, one has to assume that the pressure this kind of harness exerts on the dog’s forelimbs in an activity where the dog is supposed to be extending her forelimbs (i.e., running, walking), is not a good idea.

        “I do not believe that there is a harness on the market that is nonrestrictive and that also helps the dog not to pull,” says Dr. Zink.” There are however some very nice, well constructed, nonrestrictive harnesses on the market. However, those should not be considered as a method to teach a dog not to pull. In my opinion the real way to get a dog to stop pulling is to train it.”

         

         

        As far as a small pack for your dog to carry small items in, I would look at the line of products offered by RuffWear.

        I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT I AM DOING.  

         

        "Mental toughness is built by doing something that is hard over and over again, especially when you don't feel like doing it. Our society has conditioned us to believe that there should be no discomfort, to stop when we are uncomfortable. But the discomfort we feel when we're doing a challenging workout is an important part of the strengthening process." -Jim Afremow, The Champion's Mind: How Great Athletes Think, Train, and Thrive

          Do you pick up dog poop in the woods or just make sure it is not on the trail?

           

          So far, yes.  It's the posted rule on the trails we've been on.  I live in a large urban area and the dog-permitted trails are heavily used as such.  My guess is that if everyone threw the poop into the woods, it would become a problem.  I realize this may not be the case everywhere, but it's a rule I'm willing to follow here.

            Get slightly longer bags.  Tie the bag off on the leash, double-bag it if you're worried.  If you're REALLY worried, keep a few inches of cord tied to the leash to make this easier.

             

            MTA: The closer you tie to the harness/collar, the less the pendulum effect.  This is really all I've ever done to do with mine. Smile

            "When a person trains once, nothing happens. When a person forces himself to do a thing a hundred or a thousand times, then he certainly has developed in more ways than physical. Is it raining? That doesn't matter. Am I tired? That doesn't matter, either. Then willpower will be no problem." 
            Emil Zatopek

            ShuffleFaster


               

              So far, yes.  It's the posted rule on the trails we've been on.  I live in a large urban area and the dog-permitted trails are heavily used as such.  My guess is that if everyone threw the poop into the woods, it would become a problem.  I realize this may not be the case everywhere, but it's a rule I'm willing to follow here.

               

              I don't have a solution for you, but I wanted to say:  "Way to go, AnneCA!"    I wish more dog owners were as responsible as you. Smile

                 

                So far, yes.  It's the posted rule on the trails we've been on.  I live in a large urban area and the dog-permitted trails are heavily used as such.  My guess is that if everyone threw the poop into the woods, it would become a problem.  I realize this may not be the case everywhere, but it's a rule I'm willing to follow here.

                 

                If it is posted, then that is the rules.  Our dog, Bailey, passed away two months ago.  I never walked him in the woods because he was so small and I always picked up after him on the roads.  I just carried the bag in my hand.  However, we have a lot trails in our area and I see the owners letting their dogs off the leash.  I don't think they are picking up the poop because they can't see where the dog is half the time.  For sure no one is picking up after the coyotes, mountain lions, and bears that are out there.


                Fat butt on couch

                   

                  I don't have a solution for you, but I wanted to say:  "Way to go, AnneCA!"    I wish more dog owners were as responsible as you. Smile

                   

                  +1.

                   

                  And I am glad you are enjoying your new pooch and he has a good home.

                  "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                   

                     

                    So far, yes.  It's the posted rule on the trails we've been on.  I live in a large urban area and the dog-permitted trails are heavily used as such.  My guess is that if everyone threw the poop into the woods, it would become a problem.  I realize this may not be the case everywhere, but it's a rule I'm willing to follow here.

                    Thank you! Our trails have poop stations at the start to grab a bag when you start and deposit full ones later.

                     

                    Now, if we could get the horses to do the same.

                    "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog