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Giving running advice (Read 661 times)


Antipodean

    I am RWOL refugee who's here at RA to stay. I generally read a whole lot more than I post, so a lot of people don't really know me. So, hi! Big grin

     

    Anyway, most of my friends know I'm a runner, but it seldom comes up because mostly none of them run and I know it's boring for non-runners to hear/talk running (Don't get that, but hey!). Anyway, a few months ago a good friend let slip she's started running using a walk/run method. I gave her loads of encouragement and when I saw her this week I asked her how it was going. She was a bit despondent and said that she's struggling to run for more than a minute or two at a time and doesn't know why her lungs are buring after one minute.

     

    I thought of the sagest advice I had read a million times before (Thanks, LTH!) and told her to SLOW DOWN!! This evening I was delighted to get a text from her saying it worked! She walked, then ran for 7 mins, walked again, then ran 5 mins. She thanked me for the advice and said she hadn't really appreciated just how slow slow is! I am so happy for her and proud that I may have influenced someone positively.

     

    I also saw my cousin's wife on Xmas Day who has started running this year and she invited me to go on a run some time. Yikes, I am so used to running alone now! Shocked

    Julie

     

    PRs:  1 mile  6:57  //  5k   24:12  //  5 mile  39:32*  //  10k   49.10*   //  Half  1:52:18

     

    * courses slightly short

     

    "It's not the mountains we conquer, but ourselves."

    ~ Sir Edmund Hillary

    Little Blue


    Grand Master for a day

      I had my brain picked this week, too.  Our friends' son has been running a bit, and has committed to a HM in April.  He was asking lots of questions.   I really feel like a noob, although I've been running for several years and completed 5 HMs.  I guess because I haven't done any intense training or had any bad injuries, I can't speak from experience.  But I was able to parrot lots of what I've read and answer his basic noob questions with the widely held  wisdom.  I'll really feel awesome if his knees stop hurting with new shoes, and he slows down enough to finish 13.1 without dying. (He's a former soccer player, so right now everything is a sprint.)

       

      Isn't it nice to learn that you've influenced someone else?Smile

        People ask me expecting some fancy answer but I usually tell them to be more consistent and slow down. It's that simple yet it's amazing how such a simple concept is so hard for many to execute. Nice to see that it worked for your cousin.

        Luke79


          It's hard for people to get away from the instinct to run "kid speed" sometimes, but it certainly is beneficial in trying to build up a base as a newer runner.

           

          @ Kiwi - I noticed your 25:01 (twice).  I hope you get that sub 25:00 soon.  I'm going for that in my next 5k as well.

           

           

           

           

           

           


          Antipodean

            It's hard for people to get away from the instinct to run "kid speed" sometimes, but it certainly is beneficial in trying to build up a base as a newer runner.

             

            @ Kiwi - I noticed your 25:01 (twice).  I hope you get that sub 25:00 soon.  I'm going for that in my next 5k as well.

            Luke, yes, the sub-25 is killing me. I think I need to work on not going out too fast - what did you say about 'kid speed'?! Cool

             

            Next chance is a 5k in February. Good luck to you, too!

            Julie

             

            PRs:  1 mile  6:57  //  5k   24:12  //  5 mile  39:32*  //  10k   49.10*   //  Half  1:52:18

             

            * courses slightly short

             

            "It's not the mountains we conquer, but ourselves."

            ~ Sir Edmund Hillary

              I am RWOL refugee who's here at RA to stay. I generally read a whole lot more than I post, so a lot of people don't really know me. So, hi! Big grin

               

              Anyway, most of my friends know I'm a runner, but it seldom comes up because mostly none of them run and I know it's boring for non-runners to hear/talk running (Don't get that, but hey!). Anyway, a few months ago a good friend let slip she's started running using a walk/run method. I gave her loads of encouragement and when I saw her this week I asked her how it was going. She was a bit despondent and said that she's struggling to run for more than a minute or two at a time and doesn't know why her lungs are buring after one minute.

               

              I thought of the sagest advice I had read a million times before (Thanks, LTH!) and told her to SLOW DOWN!! This evening I was delighted to get a text from her saying it worked! She walked, then ran for 7 mins, walked again, then ran 5 mins. She thanked me for the advice and said she hadn't really appreciated just how slow slow is! I am so happy for her and proud that I may have influenced someone positively.

               

              I also saw my cousin's wife on Xmas Day who has started running this year and she invited me to go on a run some time. Yikes, I am so used to running alone now! Shocked

              I remember seeing your previous post somewhere--I remember your Owairaka singlet!!  Good to see that!! ;o)

               

              "Lungs burning" sensation is associated with what is commonly known as "anaerobic" state where the intensity of exercise goes beyond your maximum level of oxygen consumption.  Your muscles (legs) are not getting enough oxygen and your heart and lungs get over-drive to fulfill the requirement without success (because it's beyond the limit...for now).  If you continue doing that, burning lungs will be followed by tightening of your legs because your muscles in the legs are not getting enough oxygen to fulfill the task.

               

              If you can, I would strongly suggest to eventually eliminate walking break completely.  It is the continuous running that develops fine endurance.  It doesn't matter how slow it may be; just remember--you can never run too slowly to gain training effects.

               

              Look for a new book that just came out.  It's called "Running For Your Lives" by Garth Gilmour.  It's about how the first ever jogging group, Auckland Jogging Club, was formed and how obese middle-aged business men transformed themselves into a 4-hour marathon runner in 8 months.

              MonkeyBunny


                I'm no expert but when asked I give the following advice

                 

                • Get a physical. Most people ignore this frequently mentioned advice but I have significant heart disease in my family
                • Invest in good equipment esp shoes
                • Don't ignore little injuries

                Houston Marathon 1-13-13

                Rock n Roll St. Pete Half 2-10-13

                Gasparilla 15K 2-23-13

                Armadillo 10K 3-9-13

                Ogden Marathon 5-18-13

                Steamtown?

                Baystate?

                The Goal:  Boston Marathon 4-20-15


                Antipodean

                  I remember seeing your previous post somewhere--I remember your Owairaka singlet!!  Good to see that!! ;o)

                   

                  "Lungs burning" sensation is associated with what is commonly known as "anaerobic" state where the intensity of exercise goes beyond your maximum level of oxygen consumption.  Your muscles (legs) are not getting enough oxygen and your heart and lungs get over-drive to fulfill the requirement without success (because it's beyond the limit...for now).  If you continue doing that, burning lungs will be followed by tightening of your legs because your muscles in the legs are not getting enough oxygen to fulfill the task.

                   

                  If you can, I would strongly suggest to eventually eliminate walking break completely.  It is the continuous running that develops fine endurance.  It doesn't matter how slow it may be; just remember--you can never run too slowly to gain training effects.

                   

                  Look for a new book that just came out.  It's called "Running For Your Lives" by Garth Gilmour.  It's about how the first ever jogging group, Auckland Jogging Club, was formed and how obese middle-aged business men transformed themselves into a 4-hour marathon runner in 8 months.

                   

                  Hi Nobby, good memory re the Owairaka singlet. I just caught up with my friend and I think she has renewed interest in running now that she's realised she's going too fast!

                   

                  I'll definitely look up that book, sounds like something I'd enjoy reading.

                  Julie

                   

                  PRs:  1 mile  6:57  //  5k   24:12  //  5 mile  39:32*  //  10k   49.10*   //  Half  1:52:18

                   

                  * courses slightly short

                   

                  "It's not the mountains we conquer, but ourselves."

                  ~ Sir Edmund Hillary


                  Antipodean

                    I'm no expert but when asked I give the following advice

                     

                    • Get a physical. Most people ignore this frequently mentioned advice but I have significant heart disease in my family
                    • Invest in good equipment esp shoes
                    • Don't ignore little injuries

                     

                    That's great advice. I keep meaning to talk shoes with my friend, but I don't think she's going far enough yet for it to become too much of an issue.

                    Julie

                     

                    PRs:  1 mile  6:57  //  5k   24:12  //  5 mile  39:32*  //  10k   49.10*   //  Half  1:52:18

                     

                    * courses slightly short

                     

                    "It's not the mountains we conquer, but ourselves."

                    ~ Sir Edmund Hillary