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Runner skill classifications (Read 1713 times)

    But we may never know how much natural talent really matters.  A good number of world-class athletes were trained by world-class coaches since they were little kids.  How many people can you think of who had access to world-class resources, had the right work ethic, but lacked the talent to ever even make it past a recreational level?   I think opportunity is probably the biggest hurdle for many.

     

    Actually, reflectively and linguistically, we can confuse ourselves about these things. But if you have been around runners a lot, have been a coach or have long experience with the sport, it is very easy to see when a runner has natural talent.

      Almost every runner can be better than average? Isn't the cap at 50%?

       

      Is that a mean vs. median question or a question of fuzzy math?

       

      I think that the majority of people run less than speed potential.  Therefore, those that put in high effort would likely be better than "average".

       

      With a mean vs. median perspective, 1/2 of the 10,000 entrants would indicate that those that put in effort, could finish within the top 5000.  However, a different answer would be the average time to finish the race, and it's likely that more than 50 percent of the people (> 5,000) would finish with a time faster than average.... 

       

      But, it's 5 o'clock somewhere on a Friday afternoon, awaiting my CST 5pm alarm.

       

      So, I don't think that the cap is 50%

      Cheers,

      2014 Goals:

      #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

      #2: 365 Hours training

       

        Almost every runner can be better than average? Isn't the cap at 50%?

         Maybe I missed this somewhere or everyone is just joking around, but having an age grade of 50% doesn't mean you are better or worse than 50% of other runners.  It just means that you run at 50% the speed of the world record for that age group.

        Thank you for taking the time to read my signature!

           Maybe I missed this somewhere or everyone is just joking around, but having an age grade of 50% doesn't mean you are better or worse than 50% of other runners.  It just means that you run at 50% the speed of the world record for that age group.

           

          Yes, there's nothing in the age grade tables that tell you what percentage of people can manage better than a particular grading.

          Scout7


          CPT Curmudgeon

            I guess what I'm looking for really is some spark to get me motivated to step up my running.  I've sort of plateaued with my level to where I really need to make drastic changes to start seeing improvements.  The problem is motivation to make these changes.  I have never run because I love running, its always been because I'm competitive and want to achieve something that I haven't before.  

             

            So before what motivated me was reaching arbitrary race times that were always within arms reach, but now I think I need something more than that.  But I just don't want to reach too far and end up quitting out of frustration.

             

            Methinks we've really found the problem that you've run into.

             

            All the competitive nature in the world isn't going to make you enjoy something that don't currently enjoy.  In fact, if anything, it's going to make you less likely to ever enjoy it, and thus more likely to give up on it.

             

            Really, your issue keeps coming down to what I mentioned in the Boston thread: 

             

            Goals.

             

            If your running goals are going to consist solely on achieving some quantitative or qualitative level, then you're going to be consistently disappointed.  I say this for two reasons:

             

            1) As a species, it has been shown that we derive far more enjoyment from the working and doing that goes into achieving something than the actual achievement itself.  It's the reason getting a PR or finish a race distance can seem anti-climactic; we put so much emphasis on the final state that we miss out on all the goodness along the way, which is really where the pleasure comes from.

             

            2) We are talking about fuzzy, undefinable levels that have no real meaning.  In the end, striving towards a poorly defined goal doesn't give a lot of satisfaction, but does give quite a bit of headache and heartache along the way.  I know this feeling from experience, in running and professionally.

             

            What I think you really need to do is figure out what it is that you really want, what it is that makes you happy, gives you enjoyment.  Then, go do those things.  I understand the competitive drive, I truly do.  But, I also recognize now that this drive can be a double-edged sword; on one side, it pushes you to be better at things, but on the other, it tends to suck away the satisfaction of doing, because you're constantly looking over to the next hill, never really pausing to enjoy the scenery from the one you just finished climbing, and not really taking stock of all the things you've learned during that climb.

             

            In the end, if you really want to stick with running, you'll find a way to enjoy the simple act of doing it, and that enjoyment becomes the reason to run.  Once you have that, it makes the whole idea of going out and putting in the miles needed to reach other goals that much more enjoyable.

            zonykel


              Is that a mean vs. median question or a question of fuzzy math?

               

              I think that the majority of people run less than speed potential.  Therefore, those that put in high effort would likely be better than "average".

               

              With a mean vs. median perspective, 1/2 of the 10,000 entrants would indicate that those that put in effort, could finish within the top 5000.  However, a different answer would be the average time to finish the race, and it's likely that more than 50 percent of the people (> 5,000) would finish with a time faster than average.... 

               

              But, it's 5 o'clock somewhere on a Friday afternoon, awaiting my CST 5pm alarm.

               

              So, I don't think that the cap is 50%

              Cheers,

               My comment was intended to be comical, along the same lines as the graph in your profile.


              Hawt and sexy

                Did you have a nice day too?

                 Ok, then this is exactly who I thought it was.

                 

                My advice still stands. I think you should train.

                I'm touching your pants.

                  This thread shows the diversity of goals and experiences that running offers us.  This quality is, I think, a key offering of running.  Each of us will find in it a challenge worthy of our best efforts, and we can all set goals that we can achieve.  Or fall short of.  It is all on offer.

                   

                  I got back into racing this year as a man looking to best a personal mark I set as a boy.  Still haven't reached it, but I'm close.  Along the way, I've considered and rejected thousands of other goals, but selected a few in addition to the one that lead me to submit an entry blank this year. 

                   

                  Ace, I hope you can find your objective standard of relative accomplishment - and that you get yourself to a status in that regard that satisfies you.  I hope you experience as much joy and learning as I am in chasing my own goals.

                  Reykjavik


                    LOL I love it! 4.5 yrs of running easy maintenance of 10 + miles, 3 half marathons in 8 months and no where near the beginners category in 5k time

                    Hope i can do better now i am not 30 lbs overweight :-)

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