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RHR consistently above 95-100, 18 yo, 6:15 mile, 20:52 minute 5k (Read 86 times)

jonleigh7


    Hi so, I've been testing my RHR rate, every morning, both lying down and sitting on my bed, using the Samsung Galaxy S7 edge's heart rate monitor (which I've read to be very accurate) and have recently confirmed it using my smart watch's heart rate monitor.

     

    I consistently see numbers above 95, for example, this morning I got a 98 for my rhr.

    When I run at race pace, my heart rate can reach 215 or even 220.

     

    Is this normal? I'm an 18 year old male, 130 pounds and 5'10''.

    I'm very lean: 10.2% b/f percentage, and I don't eat healthy, but I don't eat too unhealthy either.

     

    I exercise normally, run probably around 1-2 miles every day (I just do it to stay in shape).

     

    And I take a variety of supplements each morning: iron, omega-3 + omega-6, b12, D, C, vitamins, and zinc + magnesium.

    I make sure I don't overdose.

     

    What could be the reason for this abnormally high resting heart rate?

     

    Thanks in advance. Jon


    Dream Maker

      First of all, maximum heart rate is genetic. Resting heart rate is a combination of genetic and fitness. That is, the fitter you are, typically the lower your resting heart rate is relative to yourself- but you can't tell who is fitter by looking at two different people's resting heart rates.  Mine tends high (resting and maximum) but it does get lower for me as I'm fitter.

      "Normal" can range from 40 to 100 beats per minute.  It seems pretty high, but you're just a little active, not an athlete at your level, so it's not necessarily unhealthy. 

      A few things can raise it - overtraining, and several medical conditions.  The first that comes to mind is hyperthyroidism.  Iron deficiency anemia does as well, but that's not very likely if you are taking an iron supplement.  If this is consistent, these things are a simple blood test to figure out.  Just pop in to your doctor if you're concerned one of these could be at play.  

      Also, if you aren't deficient and are getting a full and healthy varied diet, supplements do not help.

       

       


      runktrun

        Hi so, I've been testing my RHR rate... using the Samsung Galaxy S7 edge's heart rate monitor (which I've read to be very accurate) and have recently confirmed it using my smart watch's heart rate monitor.

         

         

        Before you go searching for an explanation for your HR, try counting your pulse manually to be more accurate.  Your carotid artery in your neck will probably be easiest to find, just to ether side of your windpipe under your jaw.  Count beats for a full 60 seconds to be most accurate (I often hear count for 10 seconds and multiply by 6, too).

         

        Then...if it's still 95-100 and you feel fine and don't feel like your heart is racing, then I don't think you should be concerned.  As heatherruns said, a routine doctors appointment with your family doctor could shed more light on the situation.

        Not running for my health, but in spite of it.