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How to train for a half marathon (Can only run 2.5 miles max) (Read 456 times)

jwall5352


    I am just looking for perhaps a schedule to train for a half marathon... this is not for any particular event whatsoever, its just my personal goal to be able to run that distance.

    I was previously a smoker, quit smoking and at that time could only run 1/2 a mile. Did 2 months of the Insanity workout and now I can run 2.5 miles straight. That is just about my maximum at this point.  I run at a pace of roughly 9 minutes and 30 seconds per mile

    I no longer do insanity due to it getting boring and now I just run and lift a bit. 

    I'm really new to running and have no idea how to approach being able to run 13.1 miles.

    Any tips or suggestions at all in general would be appreciated. Thanks guys Smile

    And I'm also running to lose weight, relatively close and I'll be there in no time, started at 200, now at 177, want to get 160-165. (Any tips to burn belly fat better?)

    I'm a 5 ft 10 inch tall male, 21 years old.

     

    Thank you Smile

    jwall5352


      Also, I run 5-6 days per week Smile

        You might need to run slower.  Most runs should be at an easy pace that you could hold a conversation while running.

         

        MTA:  If you run more miles while eating the same or less, you will burn more fat.  Congratulations on quiting smoking.

          You can't target specific areas of fat. However, doing some ab work will build muscle mass and make you look a bit more defined. Lower ab work will improve posture through correction of anterior tilt (a big problem for me due to desk job).

           

          Although the article below is aimed at serious athletes (I'm talking twice a day training of moderate to high intensity) it may give you some insight to macronutrient timing:

          http://www.nutritionx.ie/the-top-ten-nutritional-mistakes-made-by-elite-athletes/

           

          On the running side, I don't know where to begin really. You need to run more miles. But run slow and only run 2/3 days a week to keep your total mileage similar to what it is at present.

            I think slowing down your runs and running more frequnetly is the best way to go, take it slow. Add in an extra day of running, then start adding distance and keep your pace slow as you go, running is a process and there is no magic way to just dramatically increase your fitness. It takes time and steady work, but you will get there! Half Marathon is a great goal


            Fat butt on couch

              Your 9:30 pace is too fast.  Someone who can run that fast should not be physically limited to such a short distance.  Slow down.  It may seem counter-intuitive, but to get to where you can run faster over a distance you do not need to train faster; it is more important to run further even if it is at a slower speed.  Longer, easy runs do way more to build your cardiovascular system than these shorter, hard efforts you are doing now.  There is a place for that say once per week, but most of your runs should be easier and longer.

               

              This is a typical issue with newer runners.  Just slow down so you can run further, even if you find the slower pace boring or depressing.  You should be able to talk with someone at your easy pace.  Over time, covering more miles will allow you to start speeding up but at less effort than before.

              "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

               

                Spaniel has it together.  listen & do exactly what he said !     he said  all you need to know at this point.  keep it simple   keep it fun

                  Spaniel has it together.  listen & do exactly what he said !     he said  all you need to know at this point.  keep it simple   keep it fun

                   

                  I'd pay attention to Spaniel too.....he'll give you good (very good) advice.....

                  Champions are made when no one is watching

                    When you get to 2.5 miles what happens, do you just collapse in a heap?  Can you take a small walk break and run another quarter mile past your house and then run back?  Extend this to half a mile next week, and the following week go past the house in the other direction as well (may not work as well if you live on a dead end street or at the end of cul-de-sac) and so on, and soon you'll be running 10 milers like nobody's business.

                    jwall5352


                      Your 9:30 pace is too fast.  Someone who can run that fast should not be physically limited to such a short distance.  Slow down.  It may seem counter-intuitive, but to get to where you can run faster over a distance you do not need to train faster; it is more important to run further even if it is at a slower speed.  Longer, easy runs do way more to build your cardiovascular system than these shorter, hard efforts you are doing now.  There is a place for that say once per week, but most of your runs should be easier and longer.

                       

                      This is a typical issue with newer runners.  Just slow down so you can run further, even if you find the slower pace boring or depressing.  You should be able to talk with someone at your easy pace.  Over time, covering more miles will allow you to start speeding up but at less effort than before.

                       

                      How fast should my pace be? Any rough estimate?


                      Miles to go

                        Run at a pace that you could carry on a conversation at.  Maybe not War and Peace, but you should be able to chit chat.  That pace is different for everyone and will change over time as you gain fitness.

                        PRs: 5K: 25:35 / 10K: 53:03 / 10mi: 1:26:15 / HM: 1:55:02

                        Upcoming: HM 4/13


                        Fat butt on couch

                          Not really, it is highly individual. but try allowing down to eleven minutes and see if you can make for mileswith reasonable comfort.

                           

                           

                          How fast should my pace be? Any rough estimate?

                          "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                           

                          half-fast


                            I had a similar problem when I first started running.  I would run faster than I should and eventually blow out all of my energy before I got to my goal for a given workout.  Then I found this training plan:

                             

                            http://site.runtex.com/index.php/category/training/5k-10k-program/

                             

                            It focuses the workouts on running for a certain length of time instead of a certain distance.  Since the goal was to run for a certain amount of time, it forced me to slow down to a pace that I could run the whole time (even if that was just above a shuffle).

                             

                            It works well up to 10k, after that I would suggest finding a half-marathon training plan.

                            II Run II


                              Apart from the pacing issues discussed above, also work to increase your mileage.

                              For example, cut down to two, but run 2 miles every day, 5-6 days a week.  Do this for 1-2 weeks, then increase your runs to 3 miles every day.  With this example, you can increase your mileage per week by 5 or 6.  Then, slowly work your way up to 13 miles in one run (and keep going if you want).


                              Take it slowly, though.  If you train too hard, you may get injured (ie shin splints or a stress fracture).

                              alevansal


                                I'm not sure I agree with the arbitrary statement that you're running too fast.  Each person has his own comfortable pace.  Maybe you're running too fast, maybe you're not.  I have friends whose easy pace when they started running was around 8:30 min/mile and others who started at more like 10:15 min/mile.  Your pace really just depends on you.  And frankly, I think you've made very respectable progress for the amount of time you've been running/working out (and not smoking).

                                 

                                Google "Beginning 5k Training Plan" and pick out a plan that looks doable/interesting to you.  Follow the plan.  Listen to your body.  When you're supposed to run an easy or comfortable pace, you should be able to carry on a conversation (as many others have said).  That effort level might correspond to a 11 min/mile pace, it might correspond to your current 9:30 min/mile pace, or it might correspond to an 8 min/mile pace.  That all depends on you and your body.  Once you've completed the 5k plan (and maybe even done a race if that idea appeals to you), search Google for "Beginning 10k Plan".  Pick out a plan that looks doable/interesting to you.  Follow the plan.  Listen to your body.  Once you've followed the plan and maybe done a race, search Google for "Beginning 15k Plan."  Pick out a plan that looks doable/interesting to you.  Then you can do the same for a half marathon plan.

                                 

                                What following a plan will do for you is give you structure of consistent running and moderate build up of mileage.  If you choose a race, then you'll have an added reason to hold yourself accountable for following that plan.  Yes, going from one plan to the next means you'll be decreasing your mileage a bit at the beginning of each plan, but that's okay.  The decreased mileage gives your body/mind a bit of time to recover before the next build up.

                                 

                                And, if I were you, I would continue to lift.  A strong body (especially a strong core - meaning glutes, hamstrings, obliques, and transverse abdominus, rectus abdominus) makes for a stronger, healthier, more injury-free runner.

                                 

                                Some places you might find plans you like are on Hal Higdon's webpage or Cool Running's webpage.

                                 

                                In any case, congratulations on quitting smoking and on getting in shape!  Hope to hear about your progress!

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