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New here... 20 weeks pregnant (Read 449 times)

Laura G in Idaho


    I've been running for about 3.5 years.  I started running after the birth of my 9th child.  During my last pregnancy, I ran a bit in the beginning, but my morning sickness really put a halt to my running.  This time around, I'm feeling good.  I'm 36 years old, 20 weeks pregnant with my 11th baby, and currently running 3x a week, about 2.5 to 3.5 miles each time.  I'm not doing any speed work, doing any weight training, or varying my workout much... just running.  As I expected, my time has slowed to an 11:30/mile pace.  Before pregnancy, I was running a 9:30 to 10:00 per mile.

     

    I need some more variety in my workouts, but since I have been sort of inconsistent with my running and have neglected all of the different types of workouts I know I should have been doing beforehand, I don't know if it is safe to add these back in.  I mean, can I increase to 4 or 5 days a week of running (or cross training on bike or swimming) and add some weight training (weight training sandwich between short runs?), speed work (even just fartleks?), and hills back into my workouts, or should I just play it safe with my same old boring flat straight 5k 3x per week?  Can I safely increase weekly mileage (slowly, of course)?

     

    Right now I don't have a written plan for my workouts, but recently, I decided to sign up for a few 5k races through the next several months of my pregnancy to keep me motivated.  So, I want to write a plan that I can use as a guide to help me prepare for my races.  If I'm not going to do anything but run my plain 5k 3x per week, there's not much to write. 

     

    All the advice I can find on running during pregnancy says not to start if you haven't been running previously, so does that mean that you cannot increase while pregnant?  The other part of all the advice I've found says to listen to your body.  What does that exactly mean?  I'm sure all other runners can understand how you must discipline yourself mentally and sometimes run when your legs feel like giant tree trunks and your arms are tired of pumping.  Does the advice to listen to my body mean that I must stop when I feel those feelings?  If I was doing some weight training, my legs and arms might feel strong enough to go longer without fatigue. 

     

    I'm not sure what I can or should be doing as far as my running/workouts.  I know as I gain weight, I'll naturally be adding to my workload without doing anything extra.  Anyway, thanks for helping me sort through my questions.

    runnergirl9508


      Congrats on your pregnancy! And wow, 11 kids: you're amazing! As for the running, yes you can keep running and even add in a day or two as long as you're feeling good. Stay hydrated, listen to your body, and don't be afraid to take a rest day or go for a walk if running just doesn't feel right. If you have access to a pool, swimming is great especially in the later stages of pregnancy. As for the weight training, look for a trainer who has experience with pregnant women. There are some decent workout DVDs by Tracy Anderson if you'd rather just workout at home. Check out the preggo thread on the women's running user groups here on RA. Again congrats and good luck!! I ran thru my pregnancy right up until I delivered at 37w4d.

       5K: 19:15       Half: 1:29:35       Marathon: 3:13:08

       

      cookiemonster


      Connoisseur of Cookies

        These are questions you need to be discussing with your OB.  Given your pregnancy history I would imagine your OB would know you pretty well.  Go talk to her/him and get answers that will be specific to you from someone who can evaluate you in person.

        ***************************************************************************************

         

        "C" is for cookie.  That's good enough for me.

        mab411


        Proboscis Colossus

          It's not mine.

          "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people

          Laura G in Idaho


            These are questions you need to be discussing with your OB.  Given your pregnancy history I would imagine your OB would know you pretty well.  Go talk to her/him and get answers that will be specific to you from someone who can evaluate you in person.

             

            I don't see an OB.  I did see a midwife once this pregnancy, but likely will be having another unassisted homebirth.  I've done a few of my births unassisted in the past, depending on circumstances.  OBs can't do much for me.  I refuse all ultrasound technology, even the doppler, unless medically indicated.  Instead of a doppler, I use my fetoscope.  I won't let them do genetic screening, amniocentesis, or the standard GTT on me.  I will do a post-prandial blood sugar test, however.  I always follow the Brewer Pregnancy Diet, and give little value to the GD diagnosis.  I don't do GBS test anymore, because I already know I'm positive (one positive test means you should always treat yourself as positive).  Since I am GBS+, I use the chlorhexidine treatment, not IV antibiotics.  My labors are so fast, I have neither time to be driven to a hospital or to call a midwife to attend me.  My fastest was 45 minutes.  Average with the last several labors has been 1 hr.  Most midwives take at least an hour to arrive once summoned.  Being driven to a hospital might be a shorter time, but why would I want to put myself into a car at the WORST point in my super fast labor and try to hold back on the labor until I arrive at a hospital to be poked and prodded, when usually, everything is just fine. 

             

            I can weigh and measure myself, take my own blood pressure, and can do urine test strips, too.  They can be purchased online.  If a problem comes up, I can see a midwife or doctor.  So, since I pretty much do my own prenatal care, I don't ever really need a doctor to follow my pregnancy.  They become annoyed at me anyway, because I decline most of what they have to offer me.

              I don't see an OB.  I did see a midwife once this pregnancy, but likely will be having another unassisted homebirth.  I've done a few of my births unassisted in the past, depending on circumstances.  OBs can't do much for me.  I refuse all ultrasound technology, even the doppler, unless medically indicated.  Instead of a doppler, I use my fetoscope.  I won't let them do genetic screening, amniocentesis, or the standard GTT on me.  I will do a post-prandial blood sugar test, however.  I always follow the Brewer Pregnancy Diet, and give little value to the GD diagnosis.  I don't do GBS test anymore, because I already know I'm positive (one positive test means you should always treat yourself as positive).  Since I am GBS+, I use the chlorhexidine treatment, not IV antibiotics.  My labors are so fast, I have neither time to be driven to a hospital or to call a midwife to attend me.  My fastest was 45 minutes.  Average with the last several labors has been 1 hr.  Most midwives take at least an hour to arrive once summoned.  Being driven to a hospital might be a shorter time, but why would I want to put myself into a car at the WORST point in my super fast labor and try to hold back on the labor until I arrive at a hospital to be poked and prodded, when usually, everything is just fine. 

               

              I can weigh and measure myself, take my own blood pressure, and can do urine test strips, too.  They can be purchased online.  If a problem comes up, I can see a midwife or doctor.  So, since I pretty much do my own prenatal care, I don't ever really need a doctor to follow my pregnancy.  They become annoyed at me anyway, because I decline most of what they have to offer me.

               

              But if you want an expert opinion--like you ask for here--you should see an expert.

              It should be mathematical, but it's not.

              Laura G in Idaho


                Maybe it seemed I was asking for an expert opinion, but actually, I was looking for another pregnant mom's experience with running in pregnancy.  I found the other forum that the first respondent gave to me, and it's what I'm looking for.  Thanks for your advice.  I suppose if I want any additional expert advice, I can crack open my midwifery texts and my copy of Exercising Through Your Pregnancy by James Clapp. 

                Laura G in Idaho


                  And Troy, most OB offices give you an ACOG pamphlet and that's the extent of their knowledge regarding exercise and pregnancy.

                    Slice ran through her pregnancy recently.  You could PM her if she doesn't pick up on this thread.

                    Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                    Laura G in Idaho


                      Thanks!  I also found the preggo running threads in the women's forum.  Smile


                      A Saucy Wench

                        And Troy, most OB offices give you an ACOG pamphlet and that's the extent of their knowledge regarding exercise and pregnancy.

                         amen

                         

                        I always recommend "Exercising through your pregnancy"  book.  You can find it on Amazon.  Gives you a lot of what to look out for. Helped me a lot through mine.

                         

                        I would hesitate in having a plan, especially if you are a person who follows plans.  Listen to your body means exactly that taken up a notch for pregnancy.  If you are tired you back off.  If you have twinges you stop. If it is hot out you back off.  Err on the side of not pushing through.  Slow down more as you need to/when you need to.  If you feel sleepy after running, it is time to back off.

                         

                        Personally, since you have been running 3 times a week and have the urge to do more I would skip adding "types" of  workouts.  Add miles or days  if you want and they feel good but keep most of your running easy.  It isnt a good idea to add volume AND speedwork when you ARENT pregnant anyway and your ligaments are getting looser and looser and it is all that much easier to get injured.  If you want to run a different route with some hills on it, thats one thing but dont do hill "work" per se and watch it on the downhills (again ligaments).  Just run the hills easy. 

                         

                        If you do add weightlifting, go lighter than you normally would. Light weight, high reps  - mostly do avoid the breath holding and grunt.  Do what you can do without disturbing breathing. Avoid the stuff lying on your back.  Think maintaining strength, not building strength.

                        I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

                         

                        "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

                        Laura G in Idaho


                          Ennay, that was very helpful, thank you.  Yes, probably should just add miles when I feel like it, and maybe some fartleks on shorter runs.  And thanks for the good advice on weights.  I never hold and grunt... always breathing, and smooth movements.  I'll start light and see how I feel.  I do have a route I can run with an upward grade and then a slight downward grade, but it's not hill work, per se.  You are correct about only adding one element at a time, pregnant or not, and thank you for the reminder to ease off if I am tired after workouts.