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Speed/Stamina workout for basketball (Read 2227 times)

Influence


    Hello, I'm new in this forum. I'm a shooting guard which really needs to work on both speed and stamina. I got 3 months till the biggest camp in my life. Can anybody give me some tips or help me create a workout?

    Thank you in advance.

      shouldn't you be working on your dribbling and shot? (TIC)


      Seriously though, from what I recall from my basketball days, we did lots of suicides, stadium/gym stairs, jump squats, etc until we either puked, or fell over.  I think you need to focus on the high intensity workouts, with some easy running for the endurance. 


      When I wrestled we did the high-intensity stuff for game-time shape, and the long running mainly to sweat more and lose more [water] weight. 


      You might even look up some of the tabata workouts.  http://www.justaguything.com/intense-tabata-interval-routines-for-ultimate-conditioning/


      Did your coach offer any suggestions? 

      Influence


        Yeah, I work on my basketball skills, too. I get up early to make 200 shots to keep my stroke good and when I come back from school do my weightlifting and back to the court playin pick up games and practicing. Really need speed and stamina though.

        No, my coach isn't really helpful when in indvidual skill improvment.

          That's too bad your coach isn't much help.


          In addition to things like suicides, squat jumps, box jumps, quick feet drills, etc. if you have a hill handy, try doing some hill sprints (I once read Kevin Durrant did lots of hill sprints prior to his senior year at Tx). Since you need to keep your speed/power and quickness, I think it's important to focus on those kids of exercises. 


          If you do a internet or youtube search, you'll find plenty of demonstrations for drills you can do that will get you in great shape (speed and endurance).


          I think you'll want to do some easy running, for a few miles a few times/week... However,  one thing I remember from when I transitioned from the non-endurance sports to running, my leaping ability took a hit. I think that's because I had been solely training my muscles to propel me forward and not upward. Then, there's the quickness part of it...



            shouldn't you be working on your dribbling and shot? (TIC)


            Seriously though, from what I recall from my basketball days, we did lots of suicides, stadium/gym stairs, jump squats, etc until we either puked, or fell over.  I think you need to focus on the high intensity workouts, with some easy running for the endurance. 


            When I wrestled we did the high-intensity stuff for game-time shape, and the long running mainly to sweat more and lose more [water] weight. 


            You might even look up some of the tabata workouts.  http://www.justaguything.com/intense-tabata-interval-routines-for-ultimate-conditioning/


            Did your coach offer any suggestions? 

             

            BoilerTom:

             

            All due respect, the thing with "athletes" is that they need both.  When NZ's All Blacks Rugby Team had the best seasons was when they actually did lots of aerobic type running, per influence of Arthur Lydiard.  They may not need to run 100 miles a week (some did) but they still need to keep up with their high fitness level.  Some of you might remember a book called "Eric"--about a young boy who got leukemia.  He was a soccer player--a pretty darn good one; but he wanted to run alot during his remission to keep himself well-conditioned so he could practice the actual skill.  This is the part most people, even runners, don't seem to understand.  Running is probably one of the best general conditioner.  Supposedly, according to his mom, Eric ran anywhere between 10~20 miles a day to stay in shape.  Lydiard's runners ran 100 miles a week so they could practice their event later on; in other words, running 100 miles a week was just a prerequisit.  NZ had the golden era in Kayaking in 1980s led by Ian Ferguson who won, I think, total of 4 Olympic gold medals in 84 and 88.  He actually consulted with Lydiard before LA Olympics and he "kayakked" 100 miles a week before he practiced kayaking fast.  Kristi Yamaguchi used stationary bike to raise her VO2Max from 40-something to 60-something SO SHE COULD PRACTICE JUMPS AND SKILLS MORE AND BETTER.  Raising your general fitness level means; for ball players like basketball or soccer or rubgy players, instead of knocking the death door after 30 sprints up and down the court with the ball; now you can do 50 comfortably.  Your skill would improve with increased workload as well.

             

            I'm assuming this "most imprtant camp" is where you do lots of actual drills and practices.  Depending on your life style and other demands, it may pay you to spend at least the first month, doing lots of running, preferably cross country type running over uneven terrain, with at least 2 long runs of over an hour or more.  During the second month, it would be helpful to do some hill exercises; starting with using longer and steeper hill but going up SLOWER to build strength; gradually, shift the hill to shorter and less steep hill, assuming you can find different types of hills, and increase the tempo.  This way, you will improve your speed toward the end of the 3-month period.  In the third week, while still maintaining at least one long run, you should work on your quickness, incorporating the gym work.  One of the best ways to do this is create some sort of sprint drills in the gym, using cones, sprinting to the cone, quick stop and turn...or even stop and sprint backwards, etc.  Some of these exercises are actually employed by some of the top sprinters so there's no reason why basketball players can't do these to develop fine speed as well.  Be creative and think about what you need; in running fast as well as being a good basketball player.  I can give you lots of sprint drills to be a better and faster runner but that alone may not help you that much in actual basketball playing.  But being quick would help you in almost any sport.  Being very fit definitely helps. 

             

            Runners are lucky that running is their activity and it also is one of the best conditioners; while other athletes may have to find ways to develop both.  Running alone would make you a superbly fit athlete but, if you neglect the technique side of it, you may not be a good player so you'll have to balance your activities. 

             

            BoilerTom:

             

            By the way, I got a new pace chart with our program so I'll send you a new PDF--but there are a few faults still so I'll add the explanation to it...

              ...one thing I remember from when I transitioned from the non-endurance sports to running, my leaping ability took a hit. I think that's because I had been solely training my muscles to propel me forward and not upward. Then, there's the quickness part of it...

               

              Spot-on; hence hills and cross country running.


              Menace to Sobriety


                I think you'll want to do some easy running, for a few miles a few times/week... However,  one thing I remember from when I transitioned from the non-endurance sports to running, my leaping ability took a hit. I think that's because I had been solely training my muscles to propel me forward and not upward. Then, there's the quickness part of it...



                 +1

                Distance running will put a smack down on any leaping ability you have. I stick with the suicides and high intensity stuff, and as BT says, maybe a few easy jogs a couple times a week, just to stay loose.

                Janie, today I quit my job. And then I told my boss to go f*** himself, and then I blackmailed him for almost sixty thousand dollars. Pass the asparagus.

                  From Nobby

                  I'm assuming this "most imprtant camp" is where you do lots of actual drills and practices.  Depending on your life style and other demands, it may pay you to spend at least the first month, doing lots of running, preferably cross country type running over uneven terrain, with at least 2 long runs of over an hour or more.  During the second month, it would be helpful to do some hill exercises; starting with using longer and steeper hill but going up SLOWER to build strength; gradually, shift the hill to shorter and less steep hill, assuming you can find different types of hills, and increase the tempo.  This way, you will improve your speed toward the end of the 3-month period.  In the third week (actually month), while still maintaining at least one long run, you should work on your quickness, incorporating the gym work.  One of the best ways to do this is create some sort of sprint drills in the gym, using cones, sprinting to the cone, quick stop and turn...or even stop and sprint backwards, etc.  Some of these exercises are actually employed by some of the top sprinters so there's no reason why basketball players can't do these to develop fine speed as well.  Be creative and think about what you need; in running fast as well as being a good basketball player.  I can give you lots of sprint drills to be a better and faster runner but that alone may not help you that much in actual basketball playing.  But being quick would help you in almost any sport.  Being very fit definitely helps. 

                   

                  The advice above from Nobby is dead on. The purpose of being fit is to allow you to recover fast between the hard sprints, back pedals, side to sides, change of direction etc.  The aerobic system gets strong and you bounce right back from hard efforts. I think the focus above is key. You don't totally give up your basketball drills and you will still be playing. I think you leave the 3rd month to focus on even more on basketball related drills.

                  Those who try, fail! Those who do what it takes to succeed, succeed!!

                  older not wiser


                    I just joined, and this post caught my eye.  My 2nd son who just graduated HS last year was the point guard on his varsity basketball team.  At 5' 9", he had to be lightning quick, and fast, and have great endurance.  BTW, I am not trying to boast here, but to be credible, my son was the team MVP, and was 1st team all league here in So Cal.  I orchestrated most of his training, as most coaches are either of no help (they weren't a guard), or they just don't have the time.  We also paid for private training, but mostly just to work on guard skills, which I believe is the most difficult position to play.  When you're 6' 7", you have to know how to dunk, block shots, and rebound.  Dribbling, passing, and long range shooting are a bonus, but not essential.  At 5' 9", your basketball skills are what sets you apart from the other guards.

                     

                    Endurance is important obviously, and even more important if your team uses a fast paced offense (like Steve Nash with the Suns), and a pressing type defense (watch the Final Four today on television).  Run lots of sprints, with minimal rest, and I mean lots of them.  Think of the pain of the final mile in a marathon, and that's the type of feel and burn you should get when doing suicides and line drills.  Funny how the theory of specificity seems to apply to running (you must do long runs to simulate the marathon), but some people think that this doesn't apply to other sports!  Even better, do this with a 10-15 pound weight vest.  Resistance training is the key to improving.  If you feel like you want to die in these workouts, then you are on the right track.  Schedule them just like in running....maybe two sessions per week.  Let your body recover for a couple of days and then repeat.  And for real fun, shoot 2 free throws after a couple of minutes instead of just standing around to recover.  This is game type simulation.

                     

                    As a guard, you must work on quickness.  Not necessarily being able to jump the highest (although that never hurts), but being the quickest with your first step, be it foward, left, right, or backward.  Watch Steve Nash or Chris Paul sometimes.  They are not the fastest in a full out sprint from baseline to baseline.  Their first step in any direction however is devastating.  That's how you beat a defender.  More important than jumping higher, is the ability to jump horizontally further.  When you are driving the lane and you make that final step to the hole, you need to cover as much distance as possible.  Your emphasis should be on improving your horizontal leap.  By coincidence, your vertical will also improve.  I recommend plyometric drills or all kinds.  Look in up on you tube etc.  Hopping, box jumps, etc are all good.  My son also used Jump Soles with a half moon proprioceptor attached.  It makes you lightning quick, and lessens you chance of a sprained ankle.  It's a must have.  Couple that with the weight vest and you will improve quickness.

                     

                    Finally, the most important thing is basketball skills.  For a guard, this means being ambidextrous.  You must be just as good with your off hand as with your dominant hand.  You should be able to do two-ball drills....cross overs, behind the back, spins etc with two basketballs.  Look it up, it is essential.  My son and I used to pass a 6 pound medicine (rubber bouncy) ball with his off hand over and over.  He used to shoot left handed with a medicine ball to improve his strength.  In one off season game, he sprained his right wrist the week before, so he shot the entire game with his left hand.  Made a couple of treys, and went 5 for 5 from the free throw line.  He could pass the ball nearly then entire length of the court with his left hand.  We practiced that over and over with a 6 pound medicine ball.  If you can only go right, then you are easy to stop.  If you can go with either hand, then you are unstoppable.  Again, watch Chris Paul or Steve Nash.  When they dribble or pass, you cannot tell if they are a righty or a lefty.  Only when they shoot from distance is it evident.   That's enough for now.

                     

                     

                    Influence


                      Thank you all for your answers, I'm glad that there are many helpful people here in the forum. 

                      I'm 6"3 and I play the shooting guard position. I got the basketball skills in my hand and I never give up on my basketball training routine, just have to convert my weaknesses (speed and quickness) to a strength Smile

                      One more time, Thank you very much all and Happy Easter!

                        ...Endurance is important obviously, and even more important if your team uses a fast paced offense (like Steve Nash with the Suns), and a pressing type defense (watch the Final Four today on television).  Run lots of sprints, with minimal rest, and I mean lots of them....

                         

                        ...Finally, the most important thing is basketball skills.  

                         

                        Older not wiser:

                         

                        All due respect; I don't think any of us here are against the idea that basketball skills would be the most important thing.  My take was that the OP wanted to know about building endurance and working on sprinting ability.  I would be the first to admit that I don't know enough about basketball exercises (it took me a while to understand what "suicide" meant until I rememberd "Coach Carter"...).  But I can speak a thing or two about working on endurance and sprinting ability.  My take is that all those lots of sprint exercises and suicides are all good but, if your overall base fitness level is very low, they are not only useless but also harmful.  This is the concpet Lydiard had to fight for the last 50 years; "His 100-miles-a-week program is nothing but a pre-requisit to build tireless state so they can do more speed training/race specific training."  Same can be said about rugby practice and same can be said about figure skating or kayaking.  That is NOT to say that they should drop the ball and run more--the event specific training is, as you say, more important than anything else.  But, if you can't last for 90 minutes, much of any skill is not going to help you.  If you can't run fast, much of any suicide is not going to help you.  You'll be the one who do suicide slow.

                         

                        Event specificity should come last when you put them all together.  Suppose I'm a basketball player, if I need to work on upper body strengthening, I would go to weight training specialist and may not be a baskeball specialist.  This, to me, is what OP's intention was.  If he wanted to hear advice about basketball skills, he shouldn't come to a running message board.

                         

                        ...Think of the pain of the final mile in a marathon, and that's the type of feel and burn you should get when doing suicides and line drills...  

                         

                        By the way, all due respect, the pain you experience in the end of the marathon is COMPLETELY different from the last lap of the mile or doing lots of suicide.  You are getting all different metabolisms mixed up.  It's a very common mistake many people make; some people might turn around and say; "How can you run 26 miles?  I'd go out of breath if I run 2 blocks..."  Most anybody, even some elite runners, go out of breath if they run 2 blocks fast.  That's TOTALLY different from the ability to continue running 26 miles.  You get "burning" in your legs (and lungs) in lots of sprints or at the end of the mile due to oxygen debt.  You'll get shooting "pin-needle" pain in your quads at the end of the marathon due to pounding and break-down of muscle tissues.

                         

                        I just saw a part of a training program of Shimizu, an Olympic speed skate champion (a couple of Olympics ago).  One of the workouts involves him to ride a stationary bike ALL-OUT for 70 seconds to build-up as much as waste products in your system as possible and develop the ability to tolerate that.  After the second one, he literally collapsed on the floor--he couldn't stay up.  And he was already an Olympic champion at the time!  Marathon runners won't train this way--basketball players might benefit from something like this because they get high level of oxygen debt.

                          Runners are lucky that running is their activity and it also is one of the best conditioners; while other athletes may have to find ways to develop both.  Running alone would make you a superbly fit athlete but, if you neglect the technique side of it, you may not be a good player so you'll have to balance your activities. 

                           

                          BoilerTom:

                           

                           

                          "Running alone"  What about the ability to move laterally as well as maximum explosive quickness?   Would running alone keep these two qualities well developed?

                           

                          I really enjoy playing sports.  However I haven't found myself in a situation to play in a while.   I am concerned about maintaining my agility.   If all I do is run,  will still have my quickness next time I find myself on a field/court?  How important is it for me to include agility work into my regular exercise routine?


                          Menace to Sobriety

                             

                             

                            "Running alone"  What about the ability to move laterally as well as maximum explosive quickness?   Would running alone keep these two qualities well developed?

                             

                            I really enjoy playing sports.  However I haven't found myself in a situation to play in a while.   I am concerned about maintaining my agility.   If all I do is run,  will still have my quickness next time I find myself on a field/court?  How important is it for me to include agility work into my regular exercise routine?

                             Straight line running will not do much for your agility. If you are defining quickness as the ability to change directions quickly or react quickly to the ball, defender, or person you're defending, straight line running won't help much. You're going to have to incorporate some drills that involve lateral movement.  Some  straight running is helpful, because building  endurance will allow you to maintain what quickness you have deeper into the game, but not actually make you quicker.

                            Janie, today I quit my job. And then I told my boss to go f*** himself, and then I blackmailed him for almost sixty thousand dollars. Pass the asparagus.
                              "Running alone"  What about the ability to move laterally as well as maximum explosive quickness?   Would running alone keep these two qualities well developed?

                               

                              I really enjoy playing sports.  However I haven't found myself in a situation to play in a while.   I am concerned about maintaining my agility.   If all I do is run,  will still have my quickness next time I find myself on a field/court?  How important is it for me to include agility work into my regular exercise routine?

                               

                              If you include "ability to move laterally" and "maximum explosive quickness" as definition of "fit".  I don't know if you're trying to stir up an argument but nobody, at least not me, is trying to sell a magic pill that works for EVERYTHING.  Running makes you fit PERIOD.  Running is NOT going to make you a great juggler or ping pong player.  You seem to know what you lack--go ahead and work on it.

                              jdais


                                I would focus on explosive movements(plyometrics), hill sprints, speed/tempo runs, agility(suicides), and footwork.  Distance running will help your aerobic base.

                                Swim , Bike, and Run A LOT

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