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Hello everyone, new/old runner here (Read 189 times)

    Anecdote about starting running at a later age:

     

    I know a guy that qualified for the Olympic Trials marathon when he was about 36 years old; he'd never run before except XC in HS, and he was horrible at it then (18-19:00 5k at best). He started running about 2 years prior to qualifying with a ho-hum 2:18-something. He started running  because of an mental/emotional crisis; he was coming to terms with being a narcissist dick, and still is.

    55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

    repman


      That sorta gives me hope and pause. HAHA. I am certainly not a narcissist dick but I have been told I am too blunt.... 

      Regardless, my legs are killing me but I am holding the line to keep my pace. 2M tomorrow and done for the week... Rest and stretching all weekend then back to running Monday. 

      Gotta push till the end

      CanadianMeg


      Road to Nowhere 2020

        If your legs are killing you, dial back the pace on that individual day. Pace is not the most important thing. It's a number and some days what is easy or hard will be different. Most runs should be at an easy conversational pace; if you can't talk at least in short sentences, it is too fast. Once a week feel free to push it, but every run should not be a push. Most easy, sometimes hard. I suspect this isn't what you want to hear, but good luck.

        Half Fanatic #9292. 

        darkwave


        Mother of Cats

          If your legs are killing you, dial back the pace on that individual day. Pace is not the most important thing. It's a number and some days what is easy or hard will be different. Most runs should be at an easy conversational pace; if you can't talk at least in short sentences, it is too fast. 

           

          I've found that for me, my easy pace is one at which I can freely sing along to any music I'm listening to, FWIW.

          Everyone's gotta running blog; I'm the only one with a POOL-RUNNING blog.

           

          And...if you want a running Instagram where all the pictures are of cats, I've got you covered.


          Elite Jogger

             

            point 1) it takes months for soft tissue and bones to adapt to the stress of running.  The aerobic system and neuromuscular systems adapt much faster.  "Being cautious" includes giving your tissue time to adapt.

             

            point 2) for some reason, the people that give the most lip service to "pushing hard," "giving your best always," and "believing" are never those who are either most successful or most inspirational.  (corollary: I've never met or observed a truly inspirational person who labeled him or herself as that)

             

            If you try to always train smart, you'll end up being a tough runner.  If you try to always be tough, you won't be a very smart runner.

             

            Always listen to this wise lady as she knows her stuff. 👍

             

            I wouldn’t rush into speedwork, maybe some fartleks a couple of times a week. If you want to get faster then losing weight is absolutely crucial and the number one priority. A 250Ibs/6ft frame is a huge strain on the body for a novice runner and a recipe for injury.

            5k - 17:53 (4/19)   10k - 37:53 (11/18)   Half - 1:23:18 (4/19)   Full - 2:50:43 (4/19)

            repman


              Thanks everyone for their kind words. 

              I actually skipped Fridays workout and just lifted (light weight +reps).  My legs feel really good today but I kept it to an east 2M. The 3 days off did me good. 

              The biggest hurdle is I need to drop weight. I am simply too heavy. I run on a gravel track and I don't even want to think how bad my legs would hurt if I ran on cement! 

              Luckily, as of now, no pain in any joints just simple aches from use. 

              I'll try to take off 50 pounds by sept.

               

               

              Thanks for the advice please keep it coming!


                I'll try to take off 50 pounds by sept.

                 

                Thanks for the advice please keep it coming!

                 

                That's a very ambitious goal.  It is very difficult to lose that much weight in a few months without a significant impact on your training.

                 

                Or did you mean September, 2021?  That would be a much more realistic goal that would allow good training.

                 

                At 34, you are just a kid yet (I'm 68, so I can say that) with most of your life ahead of you.  If your goal is to be healthy and fit for the rest of your life, then that is even more reason to build up gradually.  On the other hand, if your goal is to run a fast 5K this year, then go back to the couch potato lifestyle, then feel free to abuse your body now.

                  50lbs lost in 4-5 months for a 30-something isn't outrageous, especially if they are really overweight to begin with. Me at 57 and 170lbs trying to lose 50lbs in 5 months might kill me because it would go below a baseline of muscular necessity and body function, but for someone 34 and 250-300lbs, not so much.

                   

                  An increase in activity and cutting out empty calories should do it. There are all kinds of opinions and "plans" for losing weight, but most knowledgeable people have arrived at a combo of low intensity cardio (walking) and weight lifting as the healthy-fast way to do it. And of course modifying diet to reduce rich foods. Don't try to go cold-turkey, still have that cake or BBQ, just fill up on salad, fruits and vegetables first so you have a smaller portion of the rich food. But DO go cold turkey on soda, regular AND diet. Try flavored seltzers or waters instead.

                   

                  And yes, loss of weight is a BIG boost in performance. When I crept up to 185 I was slothful and even 3-5 mile runs were a chore. Even just 10lbs lighter I noticed a big difference. If I was serious about running, I'd try to get down closer to my college race weight below 165. Yes, big for a runner, but I'm more in the mold of Nick Symmonds than Kipchoge, I'll never be skinny.

                  55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

                  repman


                    I was a running in high school (5:14 mile was my best mile time) ran 5 to 7 miles a day and weighed in at 180 pounds. That is my absolute lightest. 

                    I ballooned to 245 pounds junior year of college-I ran and ran and ran and got to 205 from March to end of May. 


                    I am 15 years older so I I figure 2.5 pounds a week is a good goal. Plus I am not immediately going back to 5+ miles a day! 

                    This time I have to make the life changes a bit slower to last....

                    katietalbot1


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                        gpageau


                          Just be patient. I was in the same boat as you a year ago, but I am at age 56. Ran in high school and college and for a few years after that. Never really fast but could put in miles. Last summer I set a goal of running a half-marathon - in 2020. I gave myself a year to train. I picked a destination half-marathon trail run that looked like fun and registered. Started very slowly; every time I got back into running, I would put on miles too quickly. I tried to run 6 days a week. Just too much with too little rest for a middle-aged guy. Also, at 215 lbs and 5-9, I needed to take the weight off slowly. 

                          Now, I'm 10 weeks out from my race and, assuming it's not canceled for COVID-19, should do okay. My goal is to finish.

                          Here are some practical things I have learned through this:

                          > One day doesn't make a difference. Feel like crap? Walk or bike instead. One run isn't going to make or break you. As you get older, rest is more important.

                           

                          > Find a plan you can work with. I have been using the Nike Run Club app. I didn't take these too seriously but have found they are a good mix of motivational runs, hard workouts and so on. I just plugged in the half-marathon plan and went to town on it. Easy to do and the cost - free - is good. Even if you don't plan on racing, just having a plan is worth it.

                          > Buy some new shoes. 

                          > At least once a week, find a group to run with. Accountability will keep you on track.

                          > Don't eat after 8 p.m.

                          gpageau


                            Just be patient. I was in the same boat as you a year ago, but I am at age 56. Ran in high school and college and for a few years after that. Never really fast but could put in miles. Last summer I set a goal of running a half-marathon - in 2020. I gave myself a year to train. I picked a destination half-marathon trail run that looked like fun and registered. Started very slowly; every time I got back into running, I would put on miles too quickly. I tried to run 6 days a week. Just too much with too little rest for a middle-aged guy. Also, at 215 lbs and 5-9, I needed to take the weight off slowly. 

                            Now, I'm 10 weeks out from my race and, assuming it's not canceled for COVID-19, should do okay. My goal is to finish.

                            Here are some practical things I have learned through this:

                            > One day doesn't make a difference. Feel like crap? Walk or bike instead. One run isn't going to make or break you. As you get older, rest is more important.

                             

                            > Find a plan you can work with. I have been using the Nike Run Club app. I didn't take these too seriously but have found they are a good mix of motivational runs, hard workouts and so on. I just plugged in the half-marathon plan and went to town on it. Easy to do and the cost - free - is good. Even if you don't plan on racing, just having a plan is worth it.

                            > Buy some new shoes. 

                            > At least once a week, find a group to run with. Accountability will keep you on track.

                            > Don't eat after 8 p.m.

                            hog4life


                              No no, I wholeheartedly agree. This will be my third time trying to get back into running and I have hurt myself both previous times. 

                              I am 6ft, I have slight gut but I have sprinters legs. I am not worrying about pace yet. 

                              It is the third week in and I feel good-which hasnt happened when I tried to push it. 

                              I figure I can start sprinting at least once a week if I make it at least 3 more weeks. But importantly for me, is being able to do it every day. 

                              My prime running days I was running at 200-so I need to get 50 off........

                              I figured the lower back pain was natural and I just have to push through it. Guess there isn't a magic bullet to fix this...

                              Do you know why you got hurt? Sounds to me like you’re doing too much too soon. Try slowing down, build a decent base, forget the sprints/speed crap, and take more rest days. Just my two cents from an old geezer!

                              repman


                                Thanks for the help guys. 

                                I have been tired and only running 1M a day, turns out I have covid-19. 

                                So hopefully I can get back on track in a week or two. 

                                Take care everyone! Stay safe out there

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