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overtraining even though im a new runner?? (Read 1157 times)

    I've really never heard this before. I started running in January 2005 and ran my first marathon in October 2005 ... I've heard that if you follow the 10% rule, you'll be fine Smile
    True .... but that is 9 months of training (pretty close to a year). Kerri has gone from 0 to almost 70 miles per month in less than 2 months.
    ---- Cynthia
      Hi Kerry Big grin That is why many seasoned runners discourage new runners from running marathons within their first year.
      Started running around May 2005 and ran my first marathon November 2005 (first race ever). Still running stronger then ever "knock on wood"

      Your toughness is made up of equal parts persistence and experience. You don't so much outrun your opponents as outlast and outsmart them, and the toughest opponent of all is the one inside your head." - Joe Henderson

        I am sure there are many examples of people here who ran marathons in their first year. Before everyone decides to respond and prove me wrong, let me say that's not the point, nor is it the question (her question was about HM). MY point was to help Kerri understand that the body adapts to running much slower than to other forms of exercise, because of the heavy involvement of ligaments and tendons. If she is going from 0 to 70 miles in 2 months, she is risking injury, especially without taking proper rest.
        Muscles tear and repair, tendons and ligaments will only adapt to your running program over time. Slowly. That is why many seasoned runners discourage new runners from running marathons within their first year. Rest days are just as important as training days. If you don't take them, you risk injury. It's really that simple. Smile
        ---- Cynthia
          Guess my point was that I went from nothing to a whole lot and managed by listening to my body. I definetly agree about taking more time off. When I first started running I only ran 4 days a week, cross training 2 days and taking one full day rest. My First & second month of running was my shortest milage (until tapering for marathon) and I think I managed around 75 miles in my second month. Listen to your body!

          Your toughness is made up of equal parts persistence and experience. You don't so much outrun your opponents as outlast and outsmart them, and the toughest opponent of all is the one inside your head." - Joe Henderson

            thank you for everyone's insightful opinions! its amazing how many differing opinions there actually are. well i ended up running monday anyway lol, but tomorrow is definately an off day for me. i think im just going to listen to my body, see how i feel and play it by ear. i just dont want to risk getting hurt, but for now i think im ok. thank you!!
              Kerry, are you following the 10% rule? You shouldn't be increasing your weekly mileage by more than 10% per week. A slow, gradual increase in miles will help prevent injury. Also, 70 miles a month is about 17 miles per week, or 3.5 miles/ day IF you are running FIVE DAYS a week. I wouldn't consider that overtraining. IMHO, of course Big grin
              2009: BQ?


              madness baby

                Two tips, Kerry: 1. learn to enjoy your rest days. allow yourself to do something fun that might not normally do, such as go on a short hike. 2. learn to run easy. as the running gets easier, try not to keep it at the same effort level. learn to reduce your effort as it gets easier. does that make sense? Wink deb
                deb


                shonan marathon, girl

                  Scout7 has good advice. From my experience, a slightly sore knee usually means it's time to take a rest, slow down, cutback mileage or that you are simply tired.

                  next race SHONAN MARATHON nov 3rd, 2012, OSAKA MARATHON nov 25th, i am aiming for nyc!

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