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two a day runs. a waste of time for me or would they help (Read 960 times)

dallasboycows


    I usually run one run in the afternoon as it is the only time I have.  I run 3-5 miles or an interval workout.  Saturday I pace for a total of up to 7 miles and sundays have worked up to an almost 10 mile long run.  I'd like to get my mileage up to about 60mpw by october as that is when my big race is.  My question is I have about an hour free at night:  If I do short 3 mile runs at a decent pace will this add anything to my aerobic level or will it just add to my chance of injury as I know obviously a 10 mile run isn't the same as two 5's, etc.?

    runwietecha


      Run three miles at a very easy pace.  You may struggle with them at first but eventually, they will serve as a cool-down/warm-up from your former and next session and will actually help speed up recovery.  There's nothing wrong with running your second runs a couple minutes slower per mile than current marathon pace, especially when you first start adding them.

        BYU coach, Ed Eyestone, gives a pretty good guide on doubling:

         

        http://www.runnersworld.com/article/1,7120,s6-238-263--13991-0,00.html

          You should read this thread.

           

          Nobby puts it beyond any shadow of a doubt, that it would be beneficial.

          I dont sweat. I ooze liquid awesome.

            I usually run one run in the afternoon as it is the only time I have.  I run 3-5 miles or an interval workout.  Saturday I pace for a total of up to 7 miles and sundays have worked up to an almost 10 mile long run.  I'd like to get my mileage up to about 60mpw by october as that is when my big race is.  My question is I have about an hour free at night:  If I do short 3 mile runs at a decent pace will this add anything to my aerobic level or will it just add to my chance of injury as I know obviously a 10 mile run isn't the same as two 5's, etc.?

            Rather than being a jerk and say; "Dude, I thought we've already covered this...!" (;o)), here's my honest feeliing and in respect with specifics you are giving here:

             

            I'm not quite clear of what you're asking here but it is a good idea to alternate length of runs and type of runs (effort) that you do each day.  Depending on what you do each day, the purpose of each day's workout should differ and you must be clear of what they are and why you're doing them. 

             

            If your long run is 10-miles, and especially because you have a time constraints, you should do that on weekend and you shouldn't cut that in 2 workouts (2 X 5 miles). 

             

            The time available each day should NOT dictate what kind of workout you do--in other words, if you only have an hour each day, just because it's short, you shouldn't run all short and fast day in and day out.  Suppose you can have 2 quality workouts per week--say, intervals and one tempo day--, these would be, and probably should be, your point workouts.  You should have good warm-up and cool-down and, even total of 30-minutes workout, the whole training would be over an hour so you might have to accommodate and get these two days as good, solid workout days; let's say Tuesday and Thursday (pretty standard).  Now you fill in the rest of the days.  Between Sunday's long run and Tuesday quality day, Monday would be an easy day; you can just jog nice and easily for 2 or 3 miles--yes, a big drop from Sunday's 10 but who cares?  Easy day should be easy day.  On Wednesday, if you're up for it, go for a medium longish run, say, 7 miles if the time allows, or if you're still recovering, considering another quality workout is coming up on Thursday, you just go easy again.  IF you want, this may be a good time to do double in, say, 5 + 5 or 2+ 7 or whatever.  You don't have to.  On Saturday, most people race or, as an alternative, you can do tempo type workout then.  If 2 tempo is too much, which is probably the case for majority of people, then do the medium long run of, say, 7 miles, or double, on Thursday and do tempo on Saturday, roll into race IF you have a race.  This would probably make your Sunday run easy--you have no choice cuz you'll be still tired.  Friday, a lot of people do just easy or do some easy strides--7~10 X 100m strides with 15 minutes warm-up and cool-down won't tire you down too much and you can easily be done within an hour.  Now you have a choice of doing easy morning jog (or evening) on easy day like 2 + 3 or 2 + 5 or 3 + 3 or something like that; be it on Monday, Wednesday or Friday.  Or, and I prefer this way, do morning easy jog on the quality workout day (Tuesday and Thursday) because, to me, it's warm-up.  My body will be more ready and I can do quality workout even better.  You can do easy supplementary jog on easy day or hard day, or both (6 to 7 days); it's your choice.

             

            This way, you'll have hard-easy; long-short; double-single variation.  How you combine them all is your choice.  Good luck.

              BYU coach, Ed Eyestone

               

              I saw Eyestone run cross country in about 1985 in London. I was running in the juniors race (Parliament Hill fields I think) and he was in the Seniors. Until that point, I had never seen somebody descend so well. His downhill speed would take him from 3rd to 1st place on each lap of a very hilly course.