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how much is sufficient warm up time? (Read 661 times)


Slow-smooth-fast

    Sounds like a silly question, but do I know when I am warmed up and ready to begin my Low HR workouts when my heart rate is around my MAF? I mean to say that when I go out for a run now my Heart rate soars as soon as i step out of the house, so I walk and jog easy until it levels out. This may sometimes take a couple of miles before I am ready to start my MAF. Sometimes it is evident that I mustn't have had a sufficient warm up, as my mile splits are getting a little quicker. EG; the following is after a warm up when I believe my MAF is ready to begin(HR steady) Mile 1: 08:12 Mile 2: 07:30 Mile 3: 07:34 Mile 4: 07:46 From looking above does this mean that I was only fully warmed up after mile 1 as I got quicker? I have found that I have been able to do more mileage due to pace of running but as I am running more, I am getting more tired during the day, this goes against MAF training principles doesn't it? Should I reduce my time on my feet?

    "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

    Scout7


    CPT Curmudgeon

      Couple things: Many people have a HR spike within the first few minutes of starting a run. I know I do. That's perfectly normal. As to how long you warm up....... It varies. I don't really "warm up" at all. I just go. First mile might be easier, but not by much. If you're doing an easy run, I don't think it matters a whole lot. Thirdly, no, it doesn't go against MAF at all. More miles is more miles, plain and simple. Your body is adjusting to the increased workload. It's perfectly normal and acceptable for it to want to rest more to be given time to adapt to the workload. That's the whole point of stressing it. Here's a question for you: When you run, and you hit a hill, do you slow down to keep your HR down? Or do you look at average HR for the entire run?


      Slow-smooth-fast

        When I hit a hill I slow down to keep it under MAF, if I ever go over MAF, I will do my best to get it back under asap, sometimes on hilly courses and after a good few miles this may mean a walk. I would never go on average as this could mean that I could go over my MAF by lets say 15, for 2 minutes, and average it out with 2 minutes under MAF by 15. This would defeat the object of my training. Smile

        "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009


        Kill

          Plus, making sure the contacts on your heart rate monitor strap are wet before starting - so it can get a good reading. This is supposedly key. My HR is all over the place for the first mile or two - once I work up a sweat it stabilizes. I've seen it suggested that using water or some kind of gel can keep it more stable from the start. I think there is a thread about it in the low HR group you may want to look for it.

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            This would defeat the object of my training. Smile
            This is where MAF and I always part ways.

            Runners run.


            Dave

              Plus, making sure the contacts on your heart rate monitor strap are wet before starting - so it can get a good reading. This is supposedly key. My HR is all over the place for the first mile or two - once I work up a sweat it stabilizes. I've seen it suggested that using water or some kind of gel can keep it more stable from the start. I think there is a thread about it in the low HR group you may want to look for it.
              I have this problem quite often and it is worse with multiple layers of tech fabrics (maybe because of static, who knows?). I use electrode gel and it seems to work. If you press on your chest strap with your hands and your heart rate reading goes down, it doesn't have good contact.
              I ran a mile and I liked it, liked it, liked it.

              dgb2n@yahoo.com
              Scout7


              CPT Curmudgeon

                This is where MAF and I always part ways.
                Yeah.
                  Here is a good interview with Daniels on warming up before a race.. Pat http://www.flocasts.org/flotrack/speakers.php?sid=38&vid=6894