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Running in sub freezing temps (Read 1043 times)


Me and my gang in Breck

    Can't seem to get out in the cold this week. I'm a native but I hate the cold. Tomorrow is gonna be in the low 30's. I love that temp with no wind. Yup, tomorrow will be my day.

    That which does not kill us makes us stronger. Neitzsche "Only those who risk going too far can possibly find out how far they can go." "Dedication and commitment are what transfer dreams into reality."


    Eye Lick Two Rhune

      I find that running with a pair of running pants and a couple of long sleeve t-shirts (which most races up north give out after Sep), along with a light wind resitant coat work great. And like it was said before a light pair of gloves and a hat to cover the ears are a must. The running into the wind then with the wind can be tricky. I just bear it plus you get used running in cold in MN.

      ON THE 7th DAY, GOD DID AN EASY 6 "Running is a big question mark that’s there each and every day. It asks you, ‘Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'" - Peter Maher

        I actually enjoy running in winter more so than in the middle of the summer. Here in Montreal, it can get quite chilly on those morning runs. I wouldn't worry too much about your legs. I usually just wear one pair of tights for my legs for any temperatures above 0 F. I add an extra layer under my tights, or just two pairs of tights when it gets colder than that. My legs rarely get cold because they're doing all the work. Between freezing point and 20 F, I usually just wear a t shirt + a long sleeve coolmax shirt above. I add a extra soft shell shirt for lower temps and a hard shell below 0 F. I usually will feel cold for the first 5 minutes, but then feel comfortable. It's important that you don't overdress because you'll end up sweating, however technical your clothes are, and then end up being cold. Ears and hands are the hardest to keep warm. So do skimp on warm gloves and hat. I usually just have a thin moisture wicking hat that covers the ears which suffices for all conditions. For the face, I sewed a couple of face masks out of stretchy fleece. I only wear these for very cold conditions: below 0 F. In which case I also put some vaseline on exposed parts. Also, if you do your runs in the afternoon, even early evening, temperatures are warmer. The lows are usually reached around sunrise. Personally, I'm a morning runner and rather run in the cold morning than the warmer afternoon on any day. If you something to drink for a long run, and it's much below freezing point, expect it not to stay liquid for a long time. I had to go dry for the last 9 miles of my run on Monday as my Gatorade froze. It's my first cold (8 F) long run this winter, I forgot my usual trick to keep the Gatorade longer which is to keep it out on the counter overnight. I never actually tried to warm it up in the microwave Smile Finally, beware of wind and look at wind chill temperatures. - R


        clawing my way back

          RunB, You sound just like me. I did a -15 run the other day (my first run after Disney, a full 90° colder!). For those frigid long runs I fill my water bottle up with hot water. Even then, it freezes up before I get done. Cold running, gotta love it! About to head out into a hot balmy 23° now.

          Greg in ND

           

          2013 Trying to become a runner again.

          vicentefrijole


            For the face, I sewed a couple of face masks out of stretchy fleece. I only wear these for very cold conditions: below 0 F. In which case I also put some vaseline on exposed parts. If you something to drink for a long run, and it's much below freezing point, expect it not to stay liquid for a long time. I had to go dry for the last 9 miles of my run on Monday as my Gatorade froze.
            I completely agree on the use of vaseline.. a little gross but it really does the trick! I'm surprised that the gatorade froze! I would think that the salt content would push the freezing point low enough that this wouldn't happen, but I guess at 9F it's just not enough! Big grin I keep my water/gatorade in my amphipod belt (like a fuel belt) under my outermost clothing layer and that seems to keep it from freezing (at least, I've never encountered that problem)!
              What about your lungs? I find mine burn and get all tight when it is cold out. Do you all wear a gator or a scarf or just tough it out?


              clawing my way back

                What about your lungs? I find mine burn and get all tight when it is cold out. Do you all wear a gator or a scarf or just tough it out?
                I thought it would be a problem, but honestly, I've never had a problem with this. When you're heated up, the air gets plenty warm before it reaches your lungs. I'm a mouth breather, but some say breathing through your nose helps. You can cover your mouth. I tried that, but I could not get enough air, so I had to cut a hole in my underarmor face mask.

                Greg in ND

                 

                2013 Trying to become a runner again.

                Pedrn921


                  Has anyone found any good gloves/mittens that wick the sweat away? My hands always sweat pretty bad when I am running or biking. Christa
                    There is an ongoing myth that lungs freeze when running in cold weather. A myth it is, I think it is because we don't associate running to winter. But it's not much different than cross-country skiing. And no one ever asks cross-country skiers whether their lungs freeze! Smile Some people who have asthma however are more sensitive to cold air when exercising. It happens more when exercising because air is going more through the mouth and has a bit less time to heat up. Could this be your case? In which case I would wear something on my face such as a face mask to help. - R
                    vicentefrijole


                      What about your lungs? I find mine burn and get all tight when it is cold out. Do you all wear a gator or a scarf or just tough it out?
                      Similarly, when it gets really cold out, my teeth start to hurt from breathing in the cold air (I guess I'm a "mouth-breather"?... ehehe). I've used a simple (non-wool) scarf which I usually have wrapped around my neck in the winter... I just pull part of it up over my mouth/nose and it helps warm the air a bit before a breathe it. It also helps protect against the wind-burn on the face. However, it can get a little too hot and it does get pretty moist in there (which can lead to chaping), so it's not a perfect solution. I've been thinking of buying a face mask, like the one GregND uses. Does anyone have one they recommend? Do you like yours Greg? A breathing hole is probably preferable?
                        Some people who have asthma however are more sensitive to cold air when exercising. It happens more when exercising because air is going more through the mouth and has a bit less time to heat up. Could this be your case?
                        I have this issue. My lungs and windpipe sometimes become iritated from extreme cold weather running. I think it is due to the extreme dryness of the air more than the cold. I just have to know I can't do workouts--only runs--when it's really cold out. I ran a race when it was 0 F once. That didn't go so well.

                        Runners run.

                        vicentefrijole


                          There is an ongoing myth that lungs freeze when running in cold weather.
                          RunB has got it right! Big grin Just found an article that addresses just this: http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-238-267-269-7442-0,00.html If you don't want to read the whole thing (a little too narrative, if you ask me... typical of RW), then here's an interesting part: "The reason, of course, is that the human body is adapted, after surviving five major ice ages, to heat air quickly as it passes through the nose and mouth. In fact, the one legitimate lung condition that troubles runners in cold air doesn't come from the cold. In his 10 years of working with Nordic skiers at the U.S. Olympic Committee training facility in Lake Placid, New York, exercise physiologist Ken Rundell, Ph.D., found that as many as 50 percent would develop "skier's hack"--a transient cough--during or after training. In subsequent research at Marywood University in Scranton, Pennsylvania, Rundell proved that the dryness of cold air causes the "airway narrowing," a term he prefers to the more common "exercise-induced asthma." To diminish this problem, Rundell suggests using a scarf that will trap your natural water vapor when you exhale, and then allow you to "recycle" it when you inhale."
                          Scout7


                          CPT Curmudgeon

                            Has anyone found any good gloves/mittens that wick the sweat away? My hands always sweat pretty bad when I am running or biking. Christa
                            A company called Seirus makes some really good gloves. I use the Hyperlite ones, not real thick, but pretty weatherproof. They're usually not too expensive, either.


                            Finished!

                              I just got a newsletter from Active.com that talks about dressing for running in the cold LOL you guys were all right on with your recommendations! As for me, the fresh slippery snow + no sidewalks (running on the roads) means I'm putting in my miles when I get home later this weekend :P yeah, I'm a wuss.
                              Walk + Jog = wog.
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                              clawing my way back

                                I've been thinking of buying a face mask, like the one GregND uses. Does anyone have one they recommend? Do you like yours Greg? A breathing hole is probably preferable?
                                Well, personally I hate to wear any mask, but sometimes ya gotta do it! I have this one: Under Armor Cold Gear Hood It is thin and amazingly warm. I like it because it covers your head and the mask part can be dropped down onto my chin when it's not too cold. I did cut a hole for my mouth as I found it got way to hot and hard to breath through the fabric. When it's below zero or very windy I pull the mask over my nose and breath out my nose to warm my face. It worked great on my 3.5 hour training run at about 4°F. An added benefit is it keeps my ipod earbuds in place! Smile

                                Greg in ND

                                 

                                2013 Trying to become a runner again.

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