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training a dog to be running companion (Read 1239 times)


My Webster

    Hello! I will be getting a puppy soon and am thinking about possibly training it to run with me. How old should he be before I start training him? My thought was to do the Couch to 5k program to get him started. Any advice out there? Oh and to all the people that are going to try and tell me that I shouldn't get a dog for this reason, I am NOT getting my dog specifically for this reason. It was a well thought out and informed decision so please no having a cow on me. Thanks! Cool TIA, Lindsey
    "Don't let the fear of striking out keep you from playing the game"
      The only thing I could think of is look into the breed. Some make great runners and some don't.
        You likely won't be able to run with your puppy right away. You'll need to get them used to the collar, then used to the leash, then walking with you holding the leash. Smile

        "Don't feel like running today...suck it up and run ...you're an athlete." (John Stanton, founder & owner of The Running Room)

         

        "The person who starts the race is not the same person who finishes the race."

        Lisa3.1


          Hello! I will be getting a puppy soon and am thinking about possibly training it to run with me. How old should he be before I start training him? My thought was to do the Couch to 5k program to get him started. Any advice out there? Oh and to all the people that are going to try and tell me that I shouldn't get a dog for this reason, I am NOT getting my dog specifically for this reason. It was a well thought out and informed decision so please no having a cow on me. Thanks! Cool TIA, Lindsey
          pup has to get used to the leash. it won't be long that pup can run along. we recently got a siberian husky black lab. I do take her out often, and I grad. increase how long we are out, that way she gets used to it. What kind did you get; it's Cute. Congratulations
            my dog came from a shelter. She is a big red short haired mutt. She is the reason I started running, began with three miles walks everyday, and graduated to five mile runs, and more every other day. It was easier to run with her, than to walk since most dogs will keep up with you if you are running. I have found that she really does not like the long runs over three miles. She will start trying to slow us down, but she sure loves to go. She sees me putting on the shorts and shoes, she starts getting real excited.
              puppy training in basic behaviors should start immediately. the dog will need to learn how to heal and walk with you without pulling or being distracted otherwise. It takes a lot of work to make a dog be obedient...but it is worth it in the long run. I didn't take mine running until he was close to a year old...depends on the surface you run on. you don't want to pound a young dog on the streets.
                This article has some good information: Running With Your Dog Tom


                Reproduction Specialist

                  What kind of pup are you getting? cagery is right. You should start right away with behaviors you want your puppy to carry into adulthood. As far as running him you will want to be careful not to over do it. He will want to go all out but you need to hold him back so he doesn't hurt himself. My inlaws train sled dogs and up until about 5 - 6 months old they do not use them for any pulling at all. They get them used to being harnessed and handled and might work a little on commands. This would go the same for running with a dog. Up until about 5 - 6 months old you would probably not want to run your dog too hard or far. Just get them used to being on leash and walking beside you or in front of you without pulling. They should maintain your pace and pay attention to you. You could ease into it and do the first week of the Couch to 5k program to start once the pup is about 4 months old. Some things to watch for would be your dog favoring a paw, dehydrating, overheating, joint problems. Dogs are not always smart enough to know when enough is enough. If we allowed our Malamute to run as much as she wanted to she would run until she overheated and died. So you have to be the control and watch your dog for things that might hurt him. This is also breed dependent. If you are getting a larger breed (Great Dane, Malamute, Mastiff) you want to watch that you don't over do it because it can harm the joints since they have so much weight and they grow so fast. If you are getting a small breed they just can't handle the distances and will get very tired very fast. With medium breeds you just don't want to hurt them while they are developing. If you think about it in the terms of children: You wouldn't want a 1 year old who is just started walking to start running right away. Even when they are 6 - 8 you wouldn't want your kid to be running long distances for extended periods of time because they are still developing and too much pressure/rubbing/strain on the body can cause problems farther down the road. This is just my advice to you and it's only advice. Your dog will give you a better idea of what they are capable of. And maybe you won't have the energy to start running until your dog is 5 - 6 months old anyway since they will be a handful with housebreaking, chewing, training, not sleeping through the night, and just being so full of energy until then. Good luck. Smile


                  Blaine Moore (MM#2867)

                    My friends have dogs that will run 17-20 miles with them without too much trouble. They started them as puppies and gradually worked them up to longer distances.

                    Run to Win
                    24 Marathons, 17 Ultras, 16 States (Full List)



                      The one piece of advice I can give you is to wait a year before running the pup. During this time is when they have their bone and cartledge growth and you don't want to hurt that process. But most importantly, check with your vet prior to starting the regime just to make sure he/she is ready. As for breed recommendations, that would definately be a personal preference.
                      Happy Running,
                      Troy
                      "Start with your Head, Finish with your Heart!"
                      


                      My Webster

                        thank you everyone for all the GREAT advice! I will definately/obviously take it slow. To the person who asked....my puppy is a chocolate lab. I am so excited to get him!
                        "Don't let the fear of striking out keep you from playing the game"


                        Reproduction Specialist

                          With a lab you shouldn't have a problem with them lacking energy so long runs definitely shouldn't be a problem for him. Just take it easy for that first year of his life. I don't know what kind of mileage you will be running but remember that it takes some conditioning just like it does for us. Don't take him out on a 10 mile run his first day out and expect him to be ok. Gradually build him up. And good luck...labs are a handful and don't really grow out of that puppy stage until they are about 3 years old.
                          Lisa3.1


                            thank you everyone for all the GREAT advice! I will definately/obviously take it slow. To the person who asked....my puppy is a chocolate lab. I am so excited to get him!
                            Ok, how can I not know that, from the picture, I had no idea, which surprises me because I was iso a Chocolate Lab.
                            RunLuluRun


                              i've been told you shouldn't run with a dog until he's 1.5 years old so that his body can take it
                                i've been told you shouldn't run with a dog until he's 1.5 years old so that his body can take it
                                That is what I have heard too since the joints/bones/etc aren't fuly developed. Congrats!!

                                ~Sara
                                It's supposed to be hard. If it wasn't hard, everyone would do it. The hard is what makes it great. ~ Jimmy Dugan

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