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Advice on new running shoes (Read 75 times)

sarahve1


    Hi! I hoped to get some advice here on new running shoes, since my current ones (Nike Free RN bought in July 2016) are getting a bit old.

    I'm a 22-year old female, 175cm/5ft8inch and almost 70kg/154lbs. 
    I'm not a very great runner, can't seem to build it up. I have been running on and off for about 4 years, and now I try to go 2/3 times a week.
    I usually run for about 12-15 minutes (2km/1.3 miles) but I don't always manage to run the entire distance. Sometimes a take a 2-minute walk halfway through. And sometimes, I can run a bit further, about 15-20 minutes.
    My runs are mostly on light gravel or asphalt and some grass. 
    The things I suffer from the most are stitches in my side and leg heaviness. My legs can get tired and stiff.

     

    I hope that this is enough information! Could anyone give me any tips? Budget is definitely under $200, preferably under $150 even.

    Thanks!

    Cyberic


      What do you like about your current running shoes? What do you dislike? Any recurring pains when running, other than the stitches and leg "heavyness"?

      Proud run commuter since 2017

      RichardR


        Maybe a few comments in general would be helpful....

         

        Concerning side stitches.  I've had them.  They can be painful.  The most common cause for me has been if I run to soon after eating.  I would suggest no running until 2 hours away from the table.  That might help.  Then, for side stitch relief, the simple ideas that work for me are to always begin my exhale sharply when I step on the affected side, or, to alternate sides breathing(that means LRL inhale, RL exhale, RLR inhale, LR exhale, and so on).

         

        Leg heaviness.   hmmm.  One thing which I continue to find difficult even after running for 40 years is choosing the right pace.  I always seem to want to go too fast.  So, the first suggestion is to slow down enough that finishing your desired run is not difficult.  This seems counter productive, but it really is the way we all improve.

         

        As for shoes...Too much unknown.  First question would be:  What do you shoes look like after 100 miles?  That would tell us about something called "pronation".  Then we could suggest from there, perhaps.

         

        Keep trying and don't give up!!

          For the amount of miles you are running, I wouldn't worry too much about getting the "perfect" shoe. At 2-3km per run, I don't think you'd notice much difference between decent shoes. Just saying this so you aren't concerned and anxious about your choice.

           

          If you like Nikes, you can't go wrong with the Pegasus. The Epic React is another good all-around trainer, and might be more comfortable on your feet. A lot of people like Brooks Ravenna, also an all-around shoe.

           

          I hope you're talking Canadian dollars or something, because you can get GREAT running shoes for less than $100 American.

          55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

          sarahve1


            Thanks for the replies!

            @Cyberic: I like the fact that they're very light and flexible, but they have a weird sole structure that just makes tons of gravel stones get stuck in it, and I have to take them out after every run. My feet do hurt sometimes, mostly on the soles, but it's not very common. I have suffered from an infection in my lower leg, I think it was the membrane around the bone that was infected from too much repeated pressure on my legs? Not sure how it's called. This was before I'd started running though (I did rope skipping), I've only felt that same pain a few times since then, and it's gone away after a few days.

            @RichardR: The shoes look fine, actually. No real wear on the soles. The only thing I notice is that the upper part is a bit dented or bent where your toes meet your foot, but the top is made from very flexible material, so that could also be from putting them on every time.
            I did notice that after slowing down, I could go much further (I used to be able to not run more than 2 minutes). But I'm not sure if I can go even slower now.

            @Surly Bill: Haha no I was talking about American dollars in fact, but I'm from this tiny country in Europe so I wanted to make it a bit clearer instead of using euros.
            I really thought shoes under $100 were not that great, but good to know I was wrong on that one Smile  I have been looking at the Pegasus 37!


            Glute Force

              Which tiny European country would that be? Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Luxemburg? Just wanted to know because depending on that I could point you in the right direction better.

               

              With Zalando around in most European countries you should be able to buy and return if you dislike a shoe. I would add the Adidas Alphabounce+ and the Ultraboost to the list. They look really cool (important to get you out the door) and go on sale often. I personally love the Brooks Ghost but they are hardly ever on sale here.The New Balance Fresh Foams are really comfortable too.

              sarahve1


                Belgium, actually. Zalando does exist here, indeed! Thanks for the recommendations, I will definitely take a look at them.

                 

                For some more accurate information, I just went for a run and tried to pay attention to what was bothering me:
                It was a 1,75km run in 13 minutes, no walking (so a pace of 8km/h, a little faster than I usually go but with less problems this time).
                Average heart rate of 165 bpm, max 187 bpm (family history of quite high heart rates and I also have a mitral valve prolapse).

                The thing that was bothering me most at the end of the run was just the physical exhaustion, having to breathe really hard. There were little to no stitches this time.
                I noticed that my feet do bother me a bit. I feel like my left foot inclines toward the outside, what "hurts" in that foot (I wouldn't really call it pain though) is my heel and the outer edge. My right foot seems to incline more toward the inside, and it's mostly the arch and the ball of the big toe that "hurt" a bit in that foot. My ankles seem to experience quite a bit of pressure, I try my best not to come down right on my heels when I run though. My knees do experience some pressure but don't usually hurt.

                 

                I really hope I'm not boring you guys or looking to much into it, I just want to make sure I buy something that I can increase my running capabilities with. I'm not aiming for a marathon at all, but I kind of want to be able to at least run a 5k.

                strambo


                  Research proper running form, that is way more important than the shoe. You should be taking short steps with your foot landing under your hips on the ball of the foot or mid-foot (not heel).

                   

                  there is a couch to 5k plan that is very popular,  my wife used that as well and really liked it.  www.c25k.com

                  Cyberic



                    @Cyberic: I like the fact that they're very light and flexible, but they have a weird sole structure that just makes tons of gravel stones get stuck in it, and I have to take them out after every run. My feet do hurt sometimes, mostly on the soles, but it's not very common. I have suffered from an infection in my lower leg, I think it was the membrane around the bone that was infected from too much repeated pressure on my legs? Not sure how it's called. This was before I'd started running though (I did rope skipping), I've only felt that same pain a few times since then, and it's gone away after a few days.

                     

                    I've bought a pair of those and hated them, but that is a personal choice. I was wondering how you liked the fact that they are ultra flexible, and also do not provide that much cushioning underfoot.

                     

                    There are many many great running shoes out there. And since you do not run much, most will do the job.

                     

                    You'll probably find that your next pair's sole will not be as flexible, as the Free RN are different than most.

                     

                    If you're thinking about the Pegasus, I say go for them. Many people like them. They're a bit heavier than your shoes, but still have a decent weight for trainers, The sole will be less flexible than your actual shoes, but the ride will be more comfortable.

                     

                    Good luck!

                    Proud run commuter since 2017

                      On the running form, an easy cheat to do it the way your body wants to: walk faster and faster until it's easier to break into a jog than to walk.

                       

                      Basic school gym class exercises like deep knee bends and situps will make your running feel easier, too. Or even better, the universal exercise: Johnny Jump Ups (aka burpees). Do these on the days you don't run.

                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TU8QYVW0gDU&ab_channel=CrossFit%C2%AE

                      55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

                      sarahve1


                        I tried a 0 to 5k program when I first started (called Start to Run in Belgium), but never managed to get past a certain week, no matter how many times I repeated it or even went back. But this one looks quite different, so I might give it a shot! Thanks for the tips!

                        One other thing: any strong opinions on toggle laces vs. regular laces? The Pegasus has the option to customise and I might do that if I don't find a good-looking colour combination on Zalando.

                        cowolter


                          I believe much of it is trial and error. I went through many brands and styles before I found "my" go-to shoe. Everyone has different shaped feet, arches, instep etc and also a different gait while running. I had ASICS and Reebok’s for years and obviously loved running but my feet always hurt. I moved to Brooks and I’ve never looked back. I don’t change shoes as often as I should but I’ve had 4 pair and they’ve all been awesome

                          printsbery

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                            55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying