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How much do you vary your base building? (Read 96 times)

    Curious how much variation everyone does during base building?

     

    All easy runs?

     

    some longer/shorter?

     

    throw in any workouts during the week? tempo, long, intervals?

     

    go all by feel/mood vs a schedule?

    300m- 37 sec.

    arunnerd


    Roads Scholar

      * Some longer/shorter, all easy

      * Some hills (easy)

      * Occasional tempo

      * No speed work

       

      I might be atypical right now, coming back from long running layoff and building miles while trying hard to avoiding injury.

      I strive towards laconic wit, my wife says I'm halfway there.

        

      arunnerd.blogspot.com


      an amazing likeness

        If I'm actually training for something....Mostly easy on different routes of mix of distances, aiming for 45-60min duration + 1 quality day (select between interval, tempo, hills) mid-week + 1 longer day.  The role of the easy days is to fill-in between the quality workouts.

         

        If I'm jogging around with goal to maintain something resembling 'fitness' and burn off calories...just head out the door and run for 45 - 90 minutes.

        Acceptable at a dance, invaluable in a shipwreck.

        LedLincoln


        not bad for mile 25

          Huh, thinking about myself, I don't know how to answer. Do I do any base building? Maybe not; maybe my base is always built.  November through February, I'd say I'm in maintenance mode, just maintaining fitness, as Milktruck does, but I run year round. The rest of the year, I have 1 or 2 races each month, and I try to do a bit of preparation for them. The actual "building" that I really do is when following my spring and fall marathon training plans, but they presuppose that my base is already built.

           

          My general schedule is a brief intervals run on Wednesdays, long run on Saturdays, and easy runs all the other days...with appropriate adaptations for races or life in general.

          JMac11


          Milkman

            * Some longer/shorter, all easy

            * Some hills (easy)

            * Occasional tempo

            * No speed work

             

             

            This is exactly right. The only thing I'd add is including strides as a way to get "speed" in without doing intervals. I don't necessarily do tempo runs in the traditional sense during base building, e.g. a set distance at a prescribed pace, but instead will do fartleks when I'm just too damn bored doing easy runs every day. I'd say 95%+ of mileage is easy running pace, whereas during a training cycle, that number is more around 80%.

            5K: 16:37 (11/20)  |  10K: 34:49 (10/19)  |  HM: 1:15:28 (3/20)  |  FM: 2:36:31 (12/19) 

             

            Next Race: Suffolk County Half (10/24)

            Tchuck


            Train SMART

              I would never tell an athlete to stop doing anything even in off-season but the volume has to be less so rather than running 20% quality work do 10% and always stay in tune will all your paces year round but less volume and no stressful work outs. Doing this actually keeps you more healthy and helps in transition to race training.

              THE RECOVERY MAN. Run Injury Free. Free Recovery Report www.smartapproachtraining.com

              DavePNW


                Huh, thinking about myself, I don't know how to answer. Do I do any base building? Maybe not; maybe my base is always built.  November through February, I'd say I'm in maintenance mode, just maintaining fitness, as Milktruck does, but I run year round. The rest of the year, I have 1 or 2 races each month, and I try to do a bit of preparation for them. The actual "building" that I really do is when following my spring and fall marathon training plans, but they presuppose that my base is already built.

                 

                My general schedule is a brief intervals run on Wednesdays, long run on Saturdays, and easy runs all the other days...with appropriate adaptations for races or life in general.

                 

                This entire thing is almost exactly me too. The 12 week period of marathon training twice a year only increases the seriousness of my weekly speed workout, and the length of my LRs. In my current marathon cycle, I'm barely increasing my total weekly mileage volume; in the last 1.5 years or so, I've upped my year-round maintenance volume to roughly 65mpw, and I don't feel the need to exceed the low-mid 70s for marathon training.

                Dave

                JMac11


                Milkman

                   

                  This entire thing is almost exactly me too. The 12 week period of marathon training twice a year only increases the seriousness of my weekly speed workout, and the length of my LRs. In my current marathon cycle, I'm barely increasing my total weekly mileage volume; in the last 1.5 years or so, I've upped my year-round maintenance volume to roughly 65mpw, and I don't feel the need to exceed the low-mid 70s for marathon training.

                   

                  Traditionally, base building was either two purposes:

                   

                  1) Coming back from a long layoff or injury, where you don't want to be doing speed work as you are getting your legs ready for a cycle

                  2) Mileage actually much higher than you would do for a cycle, e.g. for a mid-70s marathon cycle, you might base build in the 90s range to build up a significant aerobic base.

                   

                  I don't know may people who follow (2) these days, but (1) definitely applies for a lot of folks.

                  5K: 16:37 (11/20)  |  10K: 34:49 (10/19)  |  HM: 1:15:28 (3/20)  |  FM: 2:36:31 (12/19) 

                   

                  Next Race: Suffolk County Half (10/24)

                  LedLincoln


                  not bad for mile 25

                     Traditionally, base building was either two purposes:

                     

                    1) Coming back from a long layoff or injury, where you don't want to be doing speed work as you are getting your legs ready for a cycle

                     

                    Makes sense.

                     

                    2) Mileage actually much higher than you would do for a cycle, e.g. for a mid-70s marathon cycle, you might base build in the 90s range to build up a significant aerobic base.

                     

                    I don't know may people who follow (2) these days, but (1) definitely applies for a lot of folks.

                     

                    That's a heck of a base.

                    wcrunner2


                    Are we there, yet?

                      For runners like myself who like to race frequently, a strict periodized training schedule isn't feasible, hence base building is a constant part of the schedule with gradually increasing mileage interrupted only by taper, race, and recovery.  At some point either time or energy will place a cap on mileage.  From there it's a matter of maintaining it other than a periodic break, more for mental recovery from racing.

                       2021 Races:

                           11/20/21 - Crooked Road 24

                       

                      Running Problem


                      Problem Child

                        FOr me base building is specific to road marathons. I try to keep a 40-50 mpw "non-training" run mileage during the year. Sometimes it happens. Sometimes it doesn't. For my most recent marathon I was trying to get my weekly mileage up to the starting level of training, and it was all easy. I'd also run whatever I felt like running. Saturdays have always been for long runs so I started those at 10-13 miles or 90 minutes depending on weather and life.

                         

                        Run by mood won't work for me. It changes too frequently. Run by schedule works better. I don't FEEL like getting out of bed for a 7am 14 mile long run when I'm not training, and part of base building for me is the mentality of doing it during training. I don't schedule my daily run distances and I don't do workouts. I just have a few runs about 1 hour long I can lengthen or shorten if I was feeling ambitious when I started, or lazy, and they seem to fit my approach.

                        Many of us aren't sure what the hell point you are trying to make and no matter how we guess, it always seems to be something else. Which usually means a person is doing it on purpose.

                        VDOT 51

                        5k19:35 | Marathon 2:59:10

                        Carl Hamilton


                          My current program:

                          Monday: 45-60 mins fairly easy

                          Tuesday: Speed Work

                          Wednesday: 30-45 easy OR if racing, Hills and some light speed work

                          Thursday: Cross Train Day

                          Friday: Tempo/Fartlek Work OR Pre-Meet if racing

                          Saturday: Race! OR Cross Train Day

                          Sunday: Long Run