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New runner - gearing up for a 5 mile race in 2 months - help! (Read 1131 times)

vmace


    Smile Hi everyone or anyone who reads this! I am new to running - in fact new to anything physical at all! I am that kid that always had the note back in school days! Anyway, years later, and here I am giving myself a new challenge - a 5 mile run in 2 months time. I have geared up to 2.5 miles on the road now, but am slow! It takes me about 43 mins to do just that, and I fear being embarrased in the 5 mile run with a time of hours, when some of my runner friends would laugh at the distance and do it in a sickening 25 mins. Embarrassed Basically I need tips for - a) breaking the 2.5 mile barrier I seem to be at and b) getting faster! I am probably trying to run before I can walk (yes I know that was bad - what can I say, I am Welsh and have a lousy sense of humour!) - but I really want to feel good about the run in 2 months and not embarrased! God - I am such a woman! Anyway - any practical advice for increasing the distance and bettering my time would be useful! Smile
      I really want to feel good about the run in 2 months and not embarrased! God - I am such a woman! Anyway - any practical advice for increasing the distance and bettering my time would be useful! Smile
      Good morning, vmace. I have yet to meet a serious runner who will laugh at a new runner for going slowly. Almost all runners were slow at some point in the game. When you go to your race, line up at the back and you won't have to talk to anyone who doesn't understand about feeling too slow. Until that point, just run to the best of your ability and understand that you have to train the body you have now, not the body you wish you had now. Don't push to the point of exhaustion on your training runs, just work steadily and consistantly. It's possible to do what you're looking at, but be prepared to have to walk some of your race. That's okay. Many people end up walking during a race, especially new runners. I hope you come to enjoy your running and want to stick with it past your goal race. - Janell, who is also, "such a woman!"

      Roads were made for journeys...


      Needs more cowbell!

        2 months to train for a 5 mile, you can do it! Don't worry about being slow...I'm a back-o-the-pack'r. Someday I hope to finish squarely in the middle or even in the first half of a pack, but for now my goal at races is just to finish. Period. And I've been at this running thing for almost 6 months, now. If you are up to 2.5 miles that is great--but be careful not to overdo it. You don't want to increase your mileage by more than 10% in any given week. I plan my workout weeks for time, so I don't increase my weekly time by more than 10%, including my longest run. Last week I ran my longest workout for 100 minutes and a weekly total of 250 minutes, this week I ran my long for 110 and my weekly total was 275. How many days are you running? 3-4 days/week is probably a good starting point. Eventually you could throw a 5th day in there, too. Rest days are important. Friday night I ran over 5.5 miles pretty fast, then did my long workout yesterday--by the last couple of miles of my long run I was feeling it! Normally I try to take off the day before (or make it a really easy run) and after my long runs, just to be nice to myself. Doing some speedwork (hills, intervals, tempo runs, fartleking) is good to help increase your speed, but you would really want to save that until you are up to maybe 15-20 miles total/week. Anyhow, you will speed up...but for now I would concentrate on simply increasing your mileage--the speed will eventually follow. Oh, and welcome! Smile k

        Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

        '14 Goals:

        • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

        vicentefrijole


          Welcome to running, vmace! As you can tell, this is a good place to get help and ask ANY type of question. We're all very friendly here (from my experience at least)! Best of luck with your new challenge... hope we see lots more of you! Big grin
            Dovetailing with what some people have said already, first of all don't worry so much about speed or time. The speed is something that will come with practice...many many hours of practice. Just focus on getting out there, having fun, and finishing. That's a lot more important than making a real spectacular showing the first time you hear the starting gun go off. Everyone has to start somewhere, and there will likely be other people in the exact same position you are! The 10% increase in mileage per week that's been mentioned is a pretty good benchmark if you want to try and avoid injuries due to overtraining. If you do the math, that's actually just about enough so that you hit the 5 mile mark for training runs by the time your race rolls around. That's also pretty handy in that you've got a bit of a cushion in there in case you need to tone it down here and there. Pushing too far, too fast is one of the quickest ways to get injured in some way so be sure you listen to what your body tells you. Of course, the most important thing is to have fun. Good luck!


            ~J

            vmace


              Smile Smile Smile Thank you very much for your good advice. This week has gone particularly well. I increased the mileage to 2.8 miles last Sunday and did that with quite a few recoveries in about 40 mins. Amazingly, the 2nd run of the week 2 days later only needed 3 recoveries and knocked a whopping 7 mins off the previous. And even better, last night's run had no recoveries - run all the way at 30 mins or so. I have to say, the satisfaction of coming home and entering the data into this website is a great incentive!! Just to see that graph!!!! I'm planning to up this Sunday's run to 3 miles dead, and go on from there this week. Thanks for the advice and making me feel less self-conscious about the times! Vicky x London UK


              Needs more cowbell!

                I have to say, the satisfaction of coming home and entering the data into this website is a great incentive!! Just to see that graph!!!!
                Ha, that's a big part of what keeps me going, too! Big grin BTW, I lived in London for a semester, back in the early 90s. I was in the Ealing/Hanwell area. Smile k

                Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

                '14 Goals:

                • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                  Hello Vmace and welcome to the great wordl of running and all the glory it can bring to you and your body. Sounds like you have progressed pretty quickly but i would not push to hard. It is common when we start that we get excited when we have great results early so we think we can go faster and longer. Only problem is your body does not react the same as our mind. So take it slow and easy, get a good tempo and the times will startto get better. But great start and yes the rewards of logging you runs and seeing the result is almost as good as SEX...I don't tell my wife that though Big grin Big grin Big grin
                  vmace


                    1st 3 mile run today and it was really hard. The sun was beating down, and typical of the British weather, now we're supposed to be at the end of our Summer the temp today was up to 29C which is significantly hotter than what I've been running in recently. So, took 5 or so recoveries, just walking when needed, and got through the distance. Was pleased to see that the time didn't take a big hit - so not bad all in all. I shall see what improvements this week hold. Thanks for all your encouraging comments, keeping me on track and sensible!! ...and as for being better than sex Shocked...don't even... that's chocolate, running...He He! Blush Vic x
                    meli22


                      Hi I'm also pretty new to running but I've been training for something a litttle different...I'm training for an "obstacle course" that includes running but in short distance, its been interesting but I'm hanging in there. Running makes me feel good and i'm pretty sure after Im done with this training I will continue running... I love it Wink
                        Vmace - Glad you're here - check out runtheplanet or runnersworld for some great runs in your area - sometimes changing your regular routine allows you to run a little further or a little faster Smile Keep us posted! lisa k
                        Cincinnati Flying Pig May 4
                          Hiya VMace: Welcome to RunningLand, home of wacky folks who run around in spandex in winter with bandaids on their nipples and vaseline on their thighs. I'm relatively new myself, with just a year of semi-serious running (after a decade of hilariously unserious running) ... but it's never been dull - and if I can do it, you can. One simple piece of advice, in case it hasn't been mentioned: run - or better yet, run/walk - to the library, book store, or running store of your choice, and pick up Jeff Galloway's "Book on Running." (Get the newer 2nd edition - I think it was printed in 2003). From what I've seen - and I've read all the biggies - Jeff Galloway is by far the best writer and running coach for beginners. I can't say enough good things about that book. Where Jack Daniels might confuse you and Hal Higdon might intimidate you (though both are great in their own way!), Galloway will make you feel very, very comfortable, and tell you EXACTLY what you need to do. He preaches a relatively low-mileage plan, with walk breaks during the runs, and one long run every week or two - and it works. Good luck (not that you need it)!
                          E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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                            After reading some of your posts below, it sounds like you might have a pacing problem. Of course, I cannot see you run from here, but having a lot of recoveries during a run is a indication that you are pushing yourself too hard during certain aspects of the run that force you to slow down or walk to recover. Try to find a treadmill somewhere so that you can learn how to pace... once you get the pacing down, you will be able to increase your distances easier. I would not worry to much about the speed as much as the distance. I know that it would seem hard to increase the mileage at first, expecially when your body is wanting to quit. But, you have to be diligent and ensure that you keep your goals in mind. With that said, you should look for ways to increase your distance by steadily increasing 1 or 2 runs a week beyond your furthest distance. I was reading through some of the posts that you had and in these you stated that you went from 2.5 to 2.8 and then to 3.0. This is very good and continue to look for runs during the week where you continue to move these distances forward. But, don't go over board on increasing your mileage. Although you might feel good at first, if you keep that up over time the injuries soon appear and thwart your entire program. Run at times when its not so hot outside. As a new runner, expecially when you are not used to the heat, you should not try and increase distances... I have been running for a long time and even then when it gets above 26C I move indoors.
                            vmace


                              Thanks everyone, some great advice. I will definately look for a copy of that book. I am starting to learn some of the tougher lessons with my running this week. After the nightmare of last Sunday's run, I stupidly agreed to go to the gym the next day with my ex-decathalon friend, who suggested some cross training. I say stupidly, as I could barely walk on Monday from aches and pains and cramps etc. I know, I should have listened to my body!!! It was after all practically screaming at me! Angry Anyway, work got a bit demanding this week so I took a couple of days off, and went for a run today, Thurs. I did a respectable 2.84 miles in 30.15 before I had a battery run down on my stepometer/mp3 player and decided to call it a day!! Roll eyes So, back up to 3 miles next run, and this time will stretch properly and definately take rest days when needed! By the way, the recoveries are probably more to do with some inclines on my circuit of the park, rather than necessity! I am getting better though! Only walked twice in todays run, and then just for 20 sec each up the incline! I know...it's like cheating! Wink Big grin
                                I know...it's like cheating! Wink Big grin
                                Actually, it's not cheating at all. For a beginner runner trying to increase distance, learning how and when to take your walk breaks is the single most important thing. I promise - learn that trick and you could do 5 miles tomorrow. And don't ever let anybody call you a wuss for taking walk breaks. Not only do they make recovery easier and let you go a lot longer - they also make you faster. My first marathon, I had one goal: to run every single step. So I did. Every. Single. Step. Didn't stop for water. Didn't take a leak. Ran every step. Almost a decade later, with a lot less training, I ran my second marathon. I walked at least a minute each mile. Guess what? I ran the second effort a good 10 minutes faster than the first one. And felt a helluva lot better afterwards. It's not cheating. It's smart training. Especially at your stage. Good luck!
                                E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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