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Ortho report (Read 469 times)

    So after having been to the X-ray lab, whose report says I have skoliosis which leads to a tilted hip (5mm difference), but my leg lengths are the same my family doctor sent me to an ortho. The dude said that contrary to the lab report and to my doc's opinion, my legs do indeed have a length discrepancy and I should wear a 7mm orthotic to make them equal. I told him, see, the report say there is no such problem. He said he looked at the X-ray - the leg length discrepancy is the reason for the skoliosis. Well. I don't know if I should trust this guy. Probably not. Hm.


    I've got a fever...

      Is the course of action different if the problem is leg-length as opposed to hip alignment? You may want to try the orthotic out just to see if alleviates your symptoms. I would get a 2nd opinion from a different ortho, though. Cheers, Jeff

      On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

      Mile Collector


      Abs of Flabs

        I would definitely go ask for a second opinion on this. He could be just trying to sell you the orthotic. I went in last year for a hip flexor problem and my physical therapist said my pelvis was tilted due to muscle imbalance. After much core strengthening (which I had none when I started), my pelvis is mostly in the correct place and the hip flexor problem is resolved. Once in a while I still feel like one leg is shorter than the other but as a whole, they fixed my problem without any drugs or external devices. What I'm trying to say is before taking any remedy, be sure you know the underlying cause of the problem. If two doctors have different opinions, then you need to dig deeper. Good luck!
          My understanding was that to determine leg length discrepancy due to bone length differences - you had to have x-rays done with strategically placed rulers. What kind of x-rays did you have? Did they do hip down? I have also been told some years ago that I had a scoliosis that was basically compensating a high hip. My question - if your body has already compensated for your high hip with the scoliosis - do you really need a lift in your shoe or will that do more harm than good? I think it is possible to have a muscle imbalance as Mile Collector says, Please keep us posted on this issue. Good luck - Cheryl

          Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the number of moments that take our breath away...(unkown)




          Go With The Flow
          Thyroid Support Group

            My understanding was that to determine leg length discrepancy due to bone length differences - you had to have x-rays done with strategically placed rulers. What kind of x-rays did you have? Did they do hip down? I have also been told some years ago that I had a scoliosis that was basically compensating a high hip. My question - if your body has already compensated for your high hip with the scoliosis - do you really need a lift in your shoe or will that do more harm than good? I think it is possible to have a muscle imbalance as Mile Collector says, Please keep us posted on this issue. Good luck - Cheryl
            I have no idea. The x-rays were done specifically for looking at spine abnormalities rather than leg length discrepancies, so all you can see in the x-ray is that the hip is tilted (i.e. they went hip up). I feel weary and do not want to visit my doctor yet again. The ortho seemed disinterested and only wanting to get yet another client through as fast as possible. Unfortunately, it boils down to an issue of trust and I trust my family doctor more than I do the orthopaedic, even if he is supposedly a specialist. This is the same orthopaedic that told me that 'swimming is good for the shoulders' hahaha. Nevertheless, I feel the scoliosis more when I am either standing still or sitting. I also run a lot barefoot, or in the mountains if shod, so any silly 0.5cm wedge is not going to change anything much. The symptoms described by my doctor (occasional tiredness at the sacroiliac joint) are more consistent with his diagnosis (scoliosis without clear aetiology) than the symptoms predicted by the ortho (knee pain). Maybe they were both doing a 'cold reading' but the ortho's failed miserably.