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Training Paces? (Read 88 times)

TheTrueKing


Perpetually searching

    Hi everyone. I ran XC and track in high school until 2017, and during that time my recovery pace was usually in the mid 7: xx's, around 7:20-7:45, and I generally felt good after my runs. However, I stopped for quite a while due to several injuries and other problems, and only recently started coming back to regular training. My pace atm is rather slow, at best in the low 8: xx's during runs, but I've noticed that the pain in my legs tends to be less at faster paces, but I'm also afraid I might injure myself if I try to stay around those paces. Does anyone have any tips on what paces I should focus on running? Also, my cadence at 7:45 pace is about 185 steps per minute, 176 steps per minute at 8:15 pace, so I'm wondering if it's also my stride opening up at faster paces which, coupled with higher cadence, makes those paces less painful?

    1600m - 5:28, 3200m - 12:24, 3 mile - 18:48, 5k - 19:00

    Pre83705


      Hello,

      Trying to figure out what pace you should be running for different runs can be too much.  I suggest keeping it simple.  Instead of thinking pace, think “effort”.   If 100% effort is a sprint, then 50% would be a nice slow jog.  For normal runs and distance runs, try running at 50-60% effort.  You should be able to carry on a conversation easily will running at a 50-60% effort.  For speed work, anything that takes you from 30 seconds up to 2 minutes, run these at a 85-90% effort - you should not be able to speak in full sentences and very few words at a time at this effort.  For anything that would take you over two minutes up to 5 minutes, run these at 80% effort - you should be able to say a few words while running at this effort.  For tempo runs, run these around 70% effort.  It should feel comfortably hard and you should feel you can sustain it for 20-25 min or so with effort.  If you can speak in full sentences, your not running fast enough and if you cant hardly say anything, you’re running too fast - you want to be right in the middle.   Here is a good article that talks about this:  https://www.instriderunner.com/running-tips-advice/effort-vs-pace

       

      I know this is a little late - but hopefully you see this and can use it to achieve what you want.  

      Gizmo2019


        Hello,

        Trying to figure out what pace you should be running for different runs can be too much.  I suggest keeping it simple.  Instead of thinking pace, think “effort”.   If 100% effort is a sprint, then 50% would be a nice slow jog.  For normal runs and distance runs, try running at 50-60% effort.  You should be able to carry on a conversation easily will running at a 50-60% effort.  For speed work, anything that takes you from 30 seconds up to 2 minutes, run these at a 85-90% effort - you should not be able to speak in full sentences and very few words at a time at this effort.  For anything that would take you over two minutes up to 5 minutes, run these at 80% effort - you should be able to say a few words while running at this effort.  For tempo runs, run these around 70% effort.  It should feel comfortably hard and you should feel you can sustain it for 20-25 min or so with effort.  If you can speak in full sentences, your not running fast enough and if you cant hardly say anything, you’re running too fast - you want to be right in the middle.   Here is a good article that talks about this:  https://www.instriderunner.com/running-tips-advice/effort-vs-pace

         

        I know this is a little late - but hopefully you see this and can use it to achieve what you want.  

         

        This is a great website thanks. I don’t see a huge difference between fartlek and intervals tho (unless the Fartlek is timed speed and interval training is based on distance?). Aren’t Fartleks naturally occurring in everyone’s runs especially long distance? I find that if I’m slowing down I think “This is taking too long” and I speed up.  But I guess what I do is not as frequent and sustained as what Fartlek is meant to be...?

        thanks for posting this. I have such a hard time figuring out what a good base pace is bc all I want to do is achieve and go faster.


        I'm out of ideas

           

          This is a great website thanks. I don’t see a huge difference between fartlek and intervals tho (unless the Fartlek is timed speed and interval training is based on distance?). Aren’t Fartleks naturally occurring in everyone’s runs especially long distance? I find that if I’m slowing down I think “This is taking too long” and I speed up.  But I guess what I do is not as frequent and sustained as what Fartlek is meant to be...?

          thanks for posting this. I have such a hard time figuring out what a good base pace is bc all I want to do is achieve and go faster.

           

          That's because that definition of fartlek does not follow the traditional definition.  Fartlek in its original format is less structured and more spontaneous and variable incorporating different distances and multiple paces.

           

          Going faster all the time is perhaps the worst approach to training one can take.  Running is not like a skilled sport where you have to practice a specific skill (running fast) to perfect it.  Rather the training is focused on developing specific physiological responses.  Running fast develops one type of physiological response; running long and slow develops a different one.  Both are required for maximum improvement.

          2019 Races:

                6/01/19 - IHM Nun Run 5K

                6/08/19 - Eagle Up Ultra 24-Hour

                6/29/19 - Loopy Bunny 6-Hour

                7/27/19 - Endless Summer 6-Hour

                8/17/19 - Lean Horse 30M

                9/21/19 - NC24

          Gizmo2019


             

            That's because that definition of fartlek does not follow the traditional definition.  Fartlek in its original format is less structured and more spontaneous and variable incorporating different distances and multiple paces.

             

            Going faster all the time is perhaps the worst approach to training one can take.  Running is not like a skilled sport where you have to practice a specific skill (running fast) to perfect it.  Rather the training is focused on developing specific physiological responses.  Running fast develops one type of physiological response; running long and slow develops a different one.  Both are required for maximum improvement.

             

            Yes I need this drilled into my head. I’m too impatient too disappointed. But I think I’m changing slowly (ironically). I have to keep re reading responses like this. Thanks