2011 Goal of Sub 20 5k (Read 4848 times)

    congrats rootiekazootie Smile

     

    I'm getting closer again.  20.19 last night.

     

    Nice job. The only thing I want to note is we need to get some more knowledge of how runners attacked these races.

    How did you feel during this 20:19 effort? Did you have a strategy? What did you do right or wrong that you can improve upon?

     

    I ran a 20:17 in May 2007.

    I did not improve on that until I learned to pace behind runners who were close to sub 20 pace runners and had similar mile splits as mine.

    In May 2008 I ran a 20:03......then in June 2008 the 19:36. Both were done by pacing behind a known (slightly) faster runner.

     

    Also having a fast course and training smart helped.

     

      Looks like you're next up Mandy. 19 seconds is just about 75 meters away. 40 or 50 strides.

       

      Michigan, you have the recipe, get your weekly miles up, add some speedwork, a sprinkling of hills

      and cook on high for 20 minutes.

      I always set targets, and the second thing i thought when i finished (right after YESSSS!) was that it's

      very close to your own pb. I'm just 3 seconds down the road from you Mich. That wheezing sound is me.

       

      Officially I ran a 19:35.85 I want all those tenths of seconds I can get!

       

      When I ran my 1st sub 20 as I was around the 4 kilometer mark I knew I was barely ahead of pace (I hit 2 miles in 12:48 which is 6 seconds ahead of pace). I was obsessed in wanting to break 20 minutes and I always thought it out in my head that I would break it by a few seconds.

       

      I always envisioned my 1st sub 20...that I would be just in good enough shape to stay right at pace and then sprint it in at the finish to earn a 19:59.99

       

      Well around 2.4 miles of my first sub 20 I thought "Ok I am running about 19:50-19:55 pace right now" and this pace hurts.

      "So if I finish in 19:55 I may be tempted to actually try and break this record again this year."

      I did not want to tempt myself into breaking my record later in the year so I decided to attack the last kilometer and bury my record by as much as possible that I would not even want to try and break it in the near future. Mission Accomplished... with a 19:36 I realized that was a crazy time to try and beat. The only way to beat that would have to be on a fast and flat course. The record stands 2.5 years later.

        with a 19:36 I realized that was a crazy time to try and beat. The only way to beat that would have to be on a fast and flat course running more, racing more, recovering better, running more and running smarter

         

        I hate to trot out the ol' motivational Henry Ford quote cliche, but "whether you believe you can or you can't, you are right". If you've decided that 19:36 is a one time unrepeatable acheivement, then it is. You will never run that fast again. Or...you can decide is it acheivable, you can train better, run more (if you have the time/desire), get help, etc. and eventually run faster. If you want to.  I don't know you, or your body, so you can tell me to go pound sand (I won't be offended). 10 years ago, when I was first playing with running races, I ran a then PR 18:38. With little desire and sporadic training and racing, that floated up to 22:35 in 2007. Last summer I just started to get serious again, and eventually ran a 18:34 in the fall. And I plan to keep getting faster. Mostly by running more than I have.

        Come all you no-hopers, you jokers and rogues
        We're on the road to nowhere, let's find out where it goes

          Nice job. The only thing I want to note is we need to get some more knowledge of how runners attacked these races.

          How did you feel during this 20:19 effort? Did you have a strategy? What did you do right or wrong that you can improve upon?

           

          I ran a 20:17 in May 2007.

          I did not improve on that until I learned to pace behind runners who were close to sub 20 pace runners and had similar mile splits as mine.

          In May 2008 I ran a 20:03......then in June 2008 the 19:36. Both were done by pacing behind a known (slightly) faster runner.

           

          Also having a fast course and training smart helped.

           

          I had a bunch of close misses last year.  At the end of the year, I squeaked under by a matter of seconds.  Without looking at my log, I recall going for broke a bit earlier on in that race. 

          "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

            I just gave a speech on my Quest for sub 20. I only had 8 minutes 30 seconds so I had to cut short my ending.

            I know 8 minutes is a long time to listen but much of the last part of this speech came from my Sub 20 race report.

             

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YDEes-egaB4

             

            Both of my sub 20 races were recorded on my youtube account as well (I wont link to them but you can find them somewhere under my youtube account).

             

            I feel very lucky to have the moments archived for all time thanks to my sister-in-law.


            Prince of Fatness

              I had a bunch of close misses last year.  At the end of the year, I squeaked under by a matter of seconds.  Without looking at my log, I recall going for broke a bit earlier on in that race. 

               

              Or perhaps you just ran to your fitness level.  How to run the 5K?  Doesn't it matter what type of racer you are?  Me, I'm conservative.  Maybe I don't like to suffer.  Maybe I want to kick at the end.  I don't know, but I always feel like I need to "save" something for the end.  Maybe you too, Nads?  I think that for someone like me the 5K is a good race to practice being aggressive.  It's a short race, so the suffering will be minimal.

               

              What I like about the 5K is that recovery is minimal so you can get plenty of racing practice.

              Semi-retired.

              RootieKazootie


                Michigan Fyler wrote:

                The only thing I want to note is we need to get some more knowledge of how runners attacked these races.

                 

                I went in believing that all the work was done beforehand, and with confidence boosting training runs that

                didn't exhaust me, so i knew i could still go faster if i embraced the pain.

                I started off just below goal pace, picked it up a little at 1 mile, then went for it in the last mile.

                (12.55 ish at 2 miles, 6.08 ish, 35?).

                 

                I'd mostly credit stopping the faster stuff until i got my weekly miles to around 40.

                Other than a month or two training for a half marathon aged 18 (38 now) i started again at the beginning of

                last year, and only averaged 7 miles per week until 64 miles for September, 120 in Oct, 150 Nov, 126 Dec,

                183 Jan. I'm at 101 for the first 20 days in Feb.

                 

                Strange thing is, since i broke 20 i've started thinking about backing off a bit for a month or two and adding

                more weight training. The faster i get, the weaker i get. I don't know if there's a solution? I can't remember

                too many strong looking distance runners.

                 

                 

                Well delivered speech Michigan. I just wouldn't have the confidence to do that. You don't

                seem nervous at all.


                Future running partner.

                  Just joining this thread, My goal this Spring is also a sub 20 5k. A couple of years ago I ran a 21:57 but I was also about 20 lbs heavier. I just did my first race in 2 years, which was a HM I ran in 1:42:22. I did this while being sick and a little dehydrated. The first couple of miles where a bit slower too because of having to weave through a lot of slower runners. I think I could have run sub 1:40. I have done a decent amount of base training since November, about 30 to 46 mpw, with long runs reaching about 14 miles. I also would do a progression run every 2 weeks to maintain leg speed and to build up aerobic speed, it was sort of my own concoction of a progression run that worked well for me, for a while. Now that I have that out of the way I am starting my strengthening phase which will consist of hills, repetitions and plyometrics up hills. That's for the next 3 weeks. After that will be 3 weeks of interval training, 1000/500 repeats, or 400,200 repeats with my HR reaching around 95% of max. Then 3 weeks of stamina work which will include tempo runs at 10k pace and mile repeats at 5k goal pace. Then a 2 week taper with some easy speed repetitions before my final race. During the next few months I plan to run 3 or 4 5k's. My weeks consist of 1 long run 2 quality runs with one being the focus of the phase I am in and 3 recovery runs with one day off. We'll see how it goes. I am hoping that by the time I get to the end of the stamina phase, I'll feel pretty comfortable with a sub 6:26/mi pace and not feel like I am straining too hard to run that. I'll also have a pretty good Idea of how it should feel for the first couple of miles, so I'll know if I am over doing it, or not going hard enough. The last mile will be just going as hard I can.

                   

                  I wish you all luck.

                    How is everyone doing?

                     

                    The snow and ice have been challenging, but I've been working out every day. A Sunday 10 mile long run with a couple kilometers in 4 minutes, and a mid-week four mile run around 8 minute pace is all the "quality" workouts I have been able to get in. Every other day has been easy/slow work outs, totaling 34 miles per week. I haven't been putting all my workouts in running ahead's logs.

                     

                    I raced twice - January 1 and January 30. The results weren't great (22 and 24 minutes), but I think going through the process was worth while. Also the pace of those two runs have been faster than any of my other runs. My next race is March 19. It is advertised as flat. Goal will be 21:59 or better.

                     

                    Hope to be in sub 20 minute shape later this year.

                     

                    good running all.


                    Future running partner.

                      Unfortunately my hopes of a sub 20 5k this spring is looking dim. Every run I have done since the HM has resulted in what feels like shin splints after the runs. I haven't run since last Friday and it hasn't really healed yet. I can feel it after walking for just a few minutes. I am worried I have a stress fracture of my tibia. Next Wednesday I'm going to see an orthopedic surgeon to find out if it is. If so it looks like I'll become good friends with a stationary recumbent bike.

                       

                      I wish all of you better luck than I have.

                        Sorry for your news Wannabe.

                         

                        I was hurting this week with some sort of nerve pain or something.

                        A pain in the backside that hurt when I walked.

                        After 4 days of limping around it miraculously dissapeared and I am up and running again.

                         

                        165 miles for the year not where I want to be but still in the ballgame.

                        My fastest 5k this year is still 22:31 set way back in January.

                        Once this crappy snow melts I may start busting some faster times.

                        I have done about 95% of my runs indoors this year.

                          Anyone have an idea of how much altitude will affect you in a race?  I've got a 5k in Denver in coming up in 2 weeks.  I feel like I could break 20 if I was running in Chicago but I have no idea how close I'll be out there.  Should I start slower then usual or just go at full speed and hope I don't die?  

                          Son, when you participate in sporting events, it's not whether you win or lose; it's how drunk you get. -- Homer Simpson


                          Future running partner.

                            Anyone have an idea of how much altitude will affect you in a race?  I've got a 5k in Denver in coming up in 2 weeks.  I feel like I could break 20 if I was running in Chicago but I have no idea how close I'll be out there.  Should I start slower then usual or just go at full speed and hope I don't die?  

                             

                            Good question. But I don't think their is a clearly defined answer for it because altitude affects everyone differently. Also it depends on how much time you will be spending in Denver before the race. I would suggest to go for it at the same kind of effort/feel you would use for a local race. Not necessarily time. I would suspect that you notice if the altitude is affecting you once you get to the first mile. If you happen to get close to 20 then you know could do it in your home town at the same effort. So use it as a confidence builder for your next 5k in your home town.

                            xor


                              (this answer comes from half and full marathon experience; I've not tried to run 5ks higher than 1500 ft)

                               

                              + Altitude affects everybody differently

                              + Denver is not up that high

                              + I don't usually notice any effects in Denver EXCEPT that my heart rate spikes more quickly... and then settles down

                               

                              My bet is that I'd notice it more in a 5k... perhaps much more... than a 50k, however. So I guess I'm perhaps talking out of my ass.

                               

                              I'd go by feel and not expect a PR.  Nor expect to spontaneously combust.  And if you do, it's 5k combustion (you puke, you sit down, you feel better in a bit) and not long-race combustion (you feel like shit for days).

                               

                                Or perhaps you just ran to your fitness level.  How to run the 5K?  Doesn't it matter what type of racer you are?  Me, I'm conservative.  Maybe I don't like to suffer.  Maybe I want to kick at the end.  I don't know, but I always feel like I need to "save" something for the end.  Maybe you too, Nads?  I think that for someone like me the 5K is a good race to practice being aggressive.  It's a short race, so the suffering will be minimal.

                                 

                                What I like about the 5K is that recovery is minimal so you can get plenty of racing practice.

                                To be honest, I don't know the answer.  I need a bit more reckless abandon on race day. More racing should get me there.  

                                "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus