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How many miles do you put on running shoes before you retire them? (Read 206 times)

Arnoldziffel


    I've gotten in the habit of retiring my running shoes around 250 miles.  I run in Saucony Triumphs, and I feel as if the cushioning is not the same after around 200--250 miles.  I am curious how frequently others retire their shoes.

      Depends on the shoe but generally over 500.

      Runners run.


      an amazing likeness

        I go by feel rather than a strict mile guideline -- when a pair doesn't feel comfortable any more, be it cushioning or how they've worn, or whatever, I'll start to use them on shorter runs, or maybe treadmill only duty.  Then retire 'em.

         

        The mileage is very individual, but for me that's usually around 400-500 miles. Sometimes a pair is just evil and needs to be sent off to lawnmower duty early, others become old favorites and linger longer.

        I've done my best to live the right way. I get up every morning and go to work each day. (thru 3-29-19)

        asteiber


          I generally retire them at 400 miles. I always rotate 2 pair so one is nearing the end of 400 miles and the other is just starting to get mileage.

           

           

          also, don't forget to donate old shoes to a good cause.  Check out my blog post https://therealartofrunning.com/soles-for-souls/

            Usually 400-500 miles. I rotate several pairs, so they get a chance to dry out between uses, so they last longer. Around 400 they usually become walking shoes for another 100 or more miles. However if I start to get random pain, especially knee pain, I know it's time to stop wearing them.


            Joggaholic

              I tend to keep mine until either the bottom sole is worn out or the top start developing holes/separation. I hadn't thrown out shoes due to noticeable discomfort when wearing them. Mileage on my shoes had been 600 miles+ (I have a current pair that I use only on treadmill that has logged almost 2000 miles)

              Dimitri Minaev


                About 800-1000 miles for Saucony Kinvara, 500-800 for Asics and Altra.

                NorthNorthwest


                  400 for my Nike Zoom Structures, and that's with rotating them. Rotating and letting them fully dry out really does make a difference. I love my Structures, but I do wish they lasted longer. I used to get ~500 out of Brooks Adrenalines before I ditched them. I landed on these mileages from experience of when they'd start to feel flat and I'd start to get pains or minor injuries, like others have said. If I'm not training very hard I'll push those mileages higher. If I'm training hard for something and already taking chances with my body, I'll hold firm to my mileage limits.

                  DavePNW


                    I go by feel rather than a strict mile guideline -- when a pair doesn't feel comfortable any more, be it cushioning or how they've worn, or whatever, I'll start to use them on shorter runs, or maybe treadmill only duty.  Then retire 'em.

                     

                    The mileage is very individual, but for me that's usually around 400-500 miles. Sometimes a pair is just evil and needs to be sent off to lawnmower duty early, others become old favorites and linger longer.

                     

                    I go by a strict mile guideline rather than feel. Because I can't really notice any difference in how old vs. new shoes feel. I still don't understand what it means when people say they "get" a certain number of miles out of a pair of shoes. I just retire them when they hit about 500.

                    Dave

                      I don't think I feel difference between old and new shoes either, so I keep using them until they start falling apart. It usually happens between 1,000 and 1,500 miles.

                        I'm another one who doesn't get rid of shoes until the soles are falling off or the upper is worn out...

                        Seattle prattle


                          about 300 for most of them and not more than about 450 for the real workhorses.

                          Life is short and nothing excites like a new pair. Out with the old and hail to the new!

                            I am milktruck's spiritual doppelganger.

                             

                            I typically get 350-450 decent miles out of training shoes. I gradually retire them after 300-350 miles, using them for shorter or recovery runs. I run 6x a week in 4x different pairs of shoes (some are newer pairs of the same shoe, sometimes). Once I start wearing them for chores, they do not go back to being running shoes.

                             

                            *I supinate, and wear the outer edge of my heels and ball of my foot faster than other parts of the midsole

                             

                            Of the shoes I've been wearing the last few years, they wear out and hit retirement in different ways:

                             

                            Hoka Challengers: the uppers split and fray, but the outsole is durable and the midsole loses a bit of life

                            Skechers GoRun Ultra Road2: the outsole wears through to the midsole, but the midsole is great and and upper is still like new

                            -all my other Skechers are the same; GoRun5, GoRun6, UltraTrail4

                            Saucony Kinvarra: midsole feels dead, upper like new, outsole ok

                            Brooks Cascadia: midsole feels hard as a rock after less than 100 miles, outsole and midsole are good

                            -same with Brooks Ghost7 I had a while back

                             

                            I have less than 100 miles on Skechers MaxTrail5 and Hoka Napali ATR, but both are wearing similar to their brethren. I got a lot of miles on a pair of Hoka Bondi, easily 500+.

                            55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

                              Depends on how many treadmill miles vs road miles. I like to get to 300 miles and then just retire and can clearly feel a difference on my first run in new shoes. If more treadmill miles they wear less. I am a strong heel striker, my last Brooks Ghost had all road miles and at 200 miles I wore off the carbon rubber sole on heel. I milked out another 50 miles just landing on the Midsole cushioning which wore even faster.  It is all individual and bodyweight plays a factor too.

                              H-WAVE - Helping Athletes Heal and Recover Faster

                                I retire my shoes when the sole wears through to the cushion.  That's usually about 3000 miles.  I've had to retire several pairs at lower mileage because my feet got larger.  I have never noticed a significant difference between a high mileage pair and a new pair of shoes.  The outside corner of the heel starts getting Shoe Goo at about 200 miles.  All running is outdoors, mostly paved, some gravel, some dirt.

                                 

                                It's possible that my shoes last so long because they get put on a boot dryer after every run.  Brooks Adrenaline GTX in winter and Brooks Addiction in the summer.

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