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fell running (Read 853 times)


Slow-smooth-fast

    In all my time here I have not seen anything about fell running, hitting the hills - a pursuit which should only be tried by the insane. I say this because over the last few weeks I decided to hit the fells to mix up my trining a little, and I can tell you I feel like a noob all over again. What are your experiences over the hill, and how on earth do you get up them steep ascents without stopping when it feels as though your lungs are gonna explode? Be good to get some advice on hill training cos this is what I really need to work on, and I believe if I can get good over the hills, then when i hit the roads, those hills should be a piece of cake.

    "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

      I fell running a couple of weeks ago, banged up both knees & my left leg gets sore just below the knee if I run more than 6 miles but, that's not what you're talking about. What is "fell running"? Is that like trail running? I've been in one trail race & try to get out to the woods a couple of times a week for some good times. There's some fairly sick hills on my routes. I just picture myself as a car, throw it into first gear, and motor up them hills.

      If ye like the nut, crack it.

       


      Slow-smooth-fast

        sorry it is probably equivalent of trail running in usa. Though it is not simply off road running, and it involves wicked terrain, ascents and descents.

        "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009


        Kill

          Fell Running Sounds too brutal for a noob like me.

          Passion is a rather frightening thing because if you have passion you don't know where it will take you.

           

          When it’s all said and done, will you have said more than you’ve done?

            Good link Bonkin. Eddy you're nuts but, in a good way. I don't know if that kind of running will necessarily lead to greater speed on the road but, it sounds like a worthy pursuit on its own. That's running way out of my experience. Maybe one of the ultrarunners or mountain runners will chime in. Give us more details. Is there a specific event you're training for?

            If ye like the nut, crack it.

             


            Finder of good newts

              Trail running - a large part of the challenge is the constant need to pay attention. Road running you can space out a fair amount, but on trails there are always roots or holes or snakes to watch out for. On a long trail run the constant vigilance can be difficult. Up those hills! To start, just keep pushing. At some grades it will seem impossible to run, pump the arms, maintain your pace based on breathing (or a heart monitor) and just keep pushing. Particularly nasty hills will have to be speed walked the first few times, just try to limit complete rests. It's really all about effort level. I've done trail runs where I've switched to speed walking and passed people that were still "running". I've also been on the other side, trying to maintain my run and been passed by a walker with long strides. Down the hills! Be aware of when your quads might fail. It's easy to keep going when you really shouldn't which could lead to injury. In smooth terain it is okay to just fly down the trail, but if it's rough or curvy make sure to give yourself room to stop.

              It's hard to look down if you don't go up

                this is a good look at fell running for those who haven't come across it before. it really is a very different thing indeed to trail running http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JVfzOCq_vWE


                Slow-smooth-fast

                  im not really training for anything in particular, just all round fitness and trying to mix it up a bit. Its great stuff. I do the odd 10K here and then.

                  "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009


                  Finder of good newts

                    Perfect! I've had some pretty weird sore muscles after a hard run up nasty terrain - it's certainly good for the back and arms (not to mention quads, hams, glut and calves). Good for training your body how to use the momentum of your arms too.

                    It's hard to look down if you don't go up

                      Steep ascents? If they are too steep, you start walking of course! Unless you are doing a very short hill and you expect a flatter bit soon enough for you to catch up you breath. A few months ago I could climb 150m in around 10-12 minutes. Yesterday evening I climbed 450-500m (not exactly sure) in 32 minutes, feeling fresh. Heart rate was averaging 170-174. I walked for maybe 2-3 of those minutes, when HR was passing 185. (My max is 200+). I was not much faster going down, did it in 25 minutes. As for when to walk, if you look at the linked video, people certainly start walking at long hills that are more than 30 degrees steep.