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Running Surface (Read 750 times)

    I think it might be useful to add running surface to the workouts, like icy roads, ashphalt, concrete, sidewalks, gravel, woodchip, trail, etc.  Just a thought, I'm sure it's been suggested before.

    2012 Goals 
    1000 Logged Miles
    5K under 20:30

    8K under 35:00

    10K under 43:00

    10Mi under 1:15:00

    Half Marathon under 1:40:00

    Complete 1st Marathon


    PR
    5K 20:32.80 (4/14/2012)
    8K 34:40.96 (3/18/2012)

    10K 44:49.19 (6/5/2010)

    1/2 Marathon 1:40:21.09 (3/24/2012)

    Running Equipment: Garmin Forerunner 305, Brooks Launch (2nd Pair, 3rd Pair, 4th Pair, 5th Pair & 6th Pair), Brooks Green Silence, Saucony Kinvara, Sennheiser PMX80 Headphones, iPod Nano

    Crosstraining Equipment: 2001 Trek 8000 Hardtail Mountain Bike, 2008 Trek 1.5 Road Bike, Kayak

      When you save a course map, you can specify this for the particular course.  

      'No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch'

       

      "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'"  - Peter Maher

       

      "Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it's hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clearheadedness that follow a long run."  -Monte Davis

        Indeed as keeponrunning says. However, if you're using a GPS device and you just like to follow the direction of the wind (or just do whatever you like), it requires you to add masses of routes. I've simply got my 'run types' set up like this:

        Outside (Road)

        Outside (Track)

        Outside (Wild)

        etc, etc

        And I then use the rating system, notes, etc to show how easy, blah blah it was. Not ideal, but my current work around as I don't want to label each route Wink

        I guess the other way is to have a route called Road, Track, etc and just use these as labels. But this would mean I'd have to go back and change old runs, and I'm too lazy.

         

        Am I still making sense? :P

        Never forget the man who mistook his wife for a hat!

        Ποτέ δεν ξεχνά τον άνθρωπο που μπέρδεψε τη γυναίκα του για ένα καπέλο!

          I live in michigan and just because I run the same route doesn't mean the surface is always the same, today was icy and I'm sure tomorrow will be slushy. It was just a thought I had since I run outside in the winter. I guess I could create multiple routes for different conditions, but I already have 30 or more routes.

          2012 Goals 
          1000 Logged Miles
          5K under 20:30

          8K under 35:00

          10K under 43:00

          10Mi under 1:15:00

          Half Marathon under 1:40:00

          Complete 1st Marathon


          PR
          5K 20:32.80 (4/14/2012)
          8K 34:40.96 (3/18/2012)

          10K 44:49.19 (6/5/2010)

          1/2 Marathon 1:40:21.09 (3/24/2012)

          Running Equipment: Garmin Forerunner 305, Brooks Launch (2nd Pair, 3rd Pair, 4th Pair, 5th Pair & 6th Pair), Brooks Green Silence, Saucony Kinvara, Sennheiser PMX80 Headphones, iPod Nano

          Crosstraining Equipment: 2001 Trek 8000 Hardtail Mountain Bike, 2008 Trek 1.5 Road Bike, Kayak

            I label routes by surface, but if you don't want to create several routes for the same course depending on whether it was icy, etc, you could make a general route called 'hard-packed snow' or 'ice', etc.  I have done this, since I figure if I'm running on 1+ ft of hard-packed snow, it's not really gonna matter if it's dirt or pavement underneath.

            'No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch'

             

            "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'"  - Peter Maher

             

            "Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it's hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clearheadedness that follow a long run."  -Monte Davis

              This is why I use 'run type' for terrain currently.

              I guess things such as ice or slush, would probably fall more in to weather conditions. But regardless, I think it would be quite nice to have the terrain type. But that said, I quite like being able to see a colourful graph that will show me all the info, distance, time, etc and the colour indicates the type of terrain.

               

              So I guess what I'm saying, is I would like to have terrain, but I'd like to be able to plot a colourful graph based on terrain type as well (Sometimes I just want my cake and I want to eat it as well!) Wink

              Never forget the man who mistook his wife for a hat!

              Ποτέ δεν ξεχνά τον άνθρωπο που μπέρδεψε τη γυναίκα του για ένα καπέλο!

                I live in michigan and just because I run the same route doesn't mean the surface is always the same, today was icy and I'm sure tomorrow will be slushy. It was just a thought I had since I run outside in the winter. I guess I could create multiple routes for different conditions, but I already have 30 or more routes.

                 

                What would you do with this information? Would you want to run reports or sort based on surface? How would that be of value?

                 

                I could see how someone running barefoot might want to identify (retrospectively) their runs on icy, hot, or gravel surfaces—you know, for bragging rights or something. But, otherwise, why couldn't you just use the notes section?

                 

                I'm not trying to be argumentative, but I just don't understand how this type of information needs to be stored in a structured manner (as opposed free form notes).

                 

                (Note:  I have a bias against the collection of data that will never, or seldom, be used—a remnant my past accounting and management reporting life.)

                  FWIW, I use weather entries as insight into the distance and, more usually, pace.  When I'm looking back at training, if I see a day that's oddly faster/slower than the norm, it's a really quick way to see why (without having to read through my sometimes copious workout notes).  I use several of the existing indicators this way already (e.g. windy, humid).

                  “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman


                  Needs more cowbell!

                    Why not create a run category for the footing type?  I've got a snow/ice/slush category...it gets used for 2-3 solid months, most years. Black eye

                    Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

                    '14 Goals:

                    • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                    • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)