Cheap shoe alert! (Read 766 times)

    8/5/20

    Marshall's (CA Bay Area)

    which means they are probably in a lot of Mashal's stores across the country

     

    Nike Zoom Fly Flyknit $50

    this colorway:

    Nike Zoom Fly Flyknit "Racer" Pack First Look - JustFreshKicks

    Nike Epic React Flyknit2 $50

    Nike Epic React Flyknit 2 - Nike News

    Nike Pegusus 35 turbo $60 (limited sizes in the store I was in, and of course my size isn't limited...)

    Only $175 - Buy Nike Zoom Pegasus 35 Turbo | RunRepeat

    55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

    Seattle prattle


      8/5/20

      Marshall's (CA Bay Area)

      which means they are probably in a lot of Mashal's stores across the country

       

      Nike Zoom Fly Flyknit $50

      this colorway:

      Nike Zoom Fly Flyknit "Racer" Pack First Look - JustFreshKicks

      Nike Epic React Flyknit2 $50

      Nike Epic React Flyknit 2 - Nike News

      Nike Pegusus 35 turbo $60 (limited sizes in the store I was in, and of course my size isn't limited...)

      Only $175 - Buy Nike Zoom Pegasus 35 Turbo | RunRepeat

      I run in the Nike Zoom Fly Flyknit shown above regularly. It is a really good shoe and I highly recommend it, esp. since it is a carbon plate shoe!

      I;ll have to check my local Marshall's next time i am in that neighborhood for my size- 8.5 men's, but i don't i would luck out like that. Usually sells for about $130  but that version is now discontinued.

        I tried on the Zoom Fly, and they weren't bad! Don't know how the stiff plate would work with my bad achilles, though. Maybe it would be better, for all I know. Still, they're a black shoe, which makes them too heavy to run in.

        55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

        Seattle prattle


          i've gotten them in several other color combinations, and the ones shown in your post area actually pretty sharp looking, NEver noticed an issue with achllles and they are notoriously cushioned and springy. I love them. Will probably pick up another pair on GOAT soon


          Glute Force

            Ross and Marshalls plus TJ Maxx. They are just great.

             

            I am curious about the best midsole technology. There is the Fresh Foam vs gel vs boost vs react vs the under armour stuff. Plus the carbon plates now. The Nike react is probably the newest hence superior? Whats your take on these?

              Ross and Marshalls plus TJ Maxx. They are just great.

               

              I am curious about the best midsole technology. There is the Fresh Foam vs gel vs boost vs react vs the under armour stuff. Plus the carbon plates now. The Nike react is probably the newest hence superior? Whats your take on these?

               

              I haven't tried everything myself, but using a scorecard that factors weight, rebound/responsiveness, cushioning/dampening and longevity, my descending list is thus:

               

              hyperburst   (skechers)

              fuelcell         (NB)

              whatever Hoka calls their stuff  (Hoka)

              fresh foam   (NB)

              boost           (adidas)

              gel               (saucony)

               

              Omissions are because I haven't run in anything else that is currently available. I've tried on the Nike Fly and Epic series shoes, and they seem nice in the store, but haven't actually RUN in them. Newer is not necessarily Gooder. Like a lot of other people, I stopped using Nike training shoes about the time they became a basketball shoe company. The racers and spikes were still ok, but they pretty much gave up on improving training shoes at that time, until maybe 2-3 years ago. Now we're in the middle of a shoe technology weapons race, and Nike is winning on the racers and catching up on the trainers. But, I think a lot of stuff from all companies is just marketing hype with the names and colors, and the inane new trend of having some small font on the midsole with manufacturing info and data, as if that mass-produced shoe were some sort of limited prototype. A lot of this stuff is probably rushed to market and not completely thought out, so newer might not be gooder.

              Nike Zoom Vaporfly 4% - Nike News

              55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying


              Glute Force

                Bill thank you that is awesome. I will not ask for specifics of how you rank them but just to make sure I understand your ranking:

                Hyperburst is actually the best and the ancient Gel technology is the worst?

                 

                If this is the case, I will have to get myself a pair of Skechers with Hyperburst.

                 

                1

                hyperburst  

                 

                 (skechers)
                2 fuel cell NB
                3 Hoka  Hoka
                4 Fresh Foam NB
                5 Boost Adidas
                6 Gel Saucony
                     
                     

                 

                I just noticed you havent included the Nikes. They have some decent trainers, but just not very durable. So I would guess you would put them somewhere near the Adidas.

                 

                And, interestingly you prefer the fuel cell more than the fresh foam - I guess this is mostly because of the price tag. May I ask you to rank them for me, assuming they are all the same price? Would be interested in that as well.

                Seattle prattle


                  I will only rank on those i run in:

                   

                  Nike ZoomX Vaporfly Next%

                  Nike Zoom Fly Flyknit

                  NB FuelCell TC

                  Hoka Clifton 6

                  Adidas Boost

                   

                  The Nike VF Next% doesn't last too long, the Nike Zoomfly will last a long time but are optimal for maybe the first 200 miles, the rest of them last a really long time and don't seem to lose anything along the way.

                   

                  IMO, the Nikes are in a league of their own, and a buddy who works in a running store and knows his stuff said really good things about the Nike Alpha Next%, which he managed to snag before they sold out.

                    The only Fresh Foam I've run in are the Zante, but I hear the Beacon is great. I'm really impressed with the FuelCell in the Rebel, it dampens the shock very well for a "responsive" material. Boost has a great feel, but it's heavy. Gel is ok, I can't really tell much of a difference, and the Asics shoes I've run in have all felt kind of hard with limited dampening (scram, venture), nothing to write home about.

                     

                    I mentioned I had not run in any Nikes in decades, other than spikes. The hyperburst material is magic, but there are some shortcomings in the uppers and outsoles. I've done most of my miles in the MaxRoad4 over the last year and really like it for long runs, but if you look above in this thread you'll see someone didn't have much luck with them. Personally, the main reason I have so many Skechers in my rotation is that I live very close to an outlet, and can pick up their good running shoes for $20-50 (about once a month or two a pair my size comes into the clearance section; still waiting for some Razor3's!). I would NOT pay retail for any of them; but I wouldn't pay retail for ANY shoe, so...

                    55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying


                    Glute Force

                      Thank you Bill & Seattle. I will likely rotate out of the Asics Nimbus and into either one of the NB or Hokas.

                       

                      I think the Nikes are really expensive by now for the mileage you get out of them. I own a pair of Pegasus Turbo 2 and they are really great but far too expensive per mile. The Adidas Bostons are less cushioned, stiffer but I have the impression that I will be able to get more out of them especially given the price difference. The Ultraboost on the other hand wears down too quickly on the heel. I dont have any shoe goo. But its a pitty that they chose lower weight over durability. This is were the Ascis have an edge.

                       

                      Has anyone tested the Hoka Carbon X? Might be a while before they go on sale.

                         

                        I mentioned I had not run in any Nikes in decades, other than spikes. The hyperburst material is magic, but there are some shortcomings in the uppers and outsoles. I've done most of my miles in the MaxRoad4 over the last year and really like it for long runs, but if you look above in this thread you'll see someone didn't have much luck with them. Personally, the main reason I have so many Skechers in my rotation is that I live very close to an outlet, and can pick up their good running shoes for $20-50 (about once a month or two a pair my size comes into the clearance section; still waiting for some Razor3's!). I would NOT pay retail for any of them; but I wouldn't pay retail for ANY shoe, so...

                        That was me who didn't have much luck with my first run in the Skechers Gorun MaxRoad 4 Hyper.  It was a 9 mile run on dirt and I ended up with my left Achilles raw from the rubbing of the shoe.  I had no issues at all with the right one no doubt due to the fact that my left foot is longer than my right.  I said that I wanted to give them another go on pavement.

                         

                        I had to wait a while for my left Achilles to heal from the raw spot that actually bled a bit and then formed a scab.  It's finally healed completely so today I decided to try a second run in them.  Two things - it was pavement and shorter at only 6.2 miles.  I loosened the left shoe as much as possible and also put band-aids over my Achilles to prevent excess rubbing.  While I could feel that the left one was different in that area than the right, I experienced no Achilles problems this time.  Not sure if it was the shorter distance, the loosened shoe, or the band-aids, or some combination.

                         

                        I have to say that I enjoyed the feel of them.  It seems they're more suited to pavement running.  I could fully feel the cushioning and it was great!  I may just use them on my pavement runs.  I think I'll try no band-aids next time and see how things go.  I even thought about cutting a small 'V' at the back of the left shoe so there would be less rubbing.  Hopefully it won't come to that.  For $49, I really wanted to give them another chance.  Not sure if I'd ever buy another pair of Skechers but I hope to at least get full wear out of this pair.

                        Personal Records:

                        5K - 20:18 ran in August 2019

                        10K - 41:15 ran in September 1990

                        Half Marathon - 1:39:06 ran in September 2020


                        an amazing likeness

                          Jason -- get some KT tape rather than bandaids if you need to keep adding some protection. Works way better in terms of sticking and being flexible.

                          Acceptable at a dance, invaluable in a shipwreck.

                            Jason -- get some KT tape rather than bandaids if you need to keep adding some protection. Works way better in terms of sticking and being flexible.

                             

                            Thanks for the tip.  I've never heard of that tape before.  Is it special to running stores/sites or can you get it at any pharmacy?

                            Personal Records:

                            5K - 20:18 ran in August 2019

                            10K - 41:15 ran in September 1990

                            Half Marathon - 1:39:06 ran in September 2020


                            an amazing likeness

                              It's just elastic therapeutic athletic tape -- those black strips you see athletes put on their thighs, knees, shoulders, etc.  But beyond that mission, the stuff is great for sticking to skin, stretching and flexing and then being easy to remove.  Widely available...Dick's, Target, Walgeens, etc.

                              Acceptable at a dance, invaluable in a shipwreck.

                                If you get a KT (Kinesiology Tape) type tape, Rock Tape is the the stickiest brand, and their H2O version is even gooderer. I have had poor results with plain KT brand KT tape. If it's just for blister abatement, plain old athletic tape works really well, and is much cheaper than moleskin or KT type tape.

                                 

                                But...why not just wear mini crew socks? That's what I wear almost all the time. The "no show" or no socks at all always seem to cause problems for me on longer runs.

                                Run Lightweight Mini-Crew | Injinji Performance Running Socks

                                55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying