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Yet another article on the dangers of running (too much). (Read 1027 times)


Fat butt on couch

    Mine isn't anything like Spaniel's, but it's pretty cool to be "off the chart" in a good way.  My lung capacity is off the chart, too.

     

    Yeah, the phlebotomist almost disqualifies me for blood donations each time.  She jokingly tells me to run around the building a couple of times first.

     

    fwiw I have only recorded that HR twice. How I did it stressed out with a scratched cornea I don't know, other than I had been training hard and it forced me to take a day off.

    "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

     

    MrNamtor


    DON'T TREAD ON ME

      Running in a competitive way (running fast or far or both)  is like being any other kind of athlete - it's not the best thing for you in terms of health or longevity. I think this would be true of baseball players, footballers, tennis players, anyone. If you're pushing yourself, getting injured, putting stress and pressure on your body because you are trying to  improve performance, then it will have some negative effects on your body and your general health.

       

      I think we could just go through the forum's membership and take a survey of what injuries everyone currently has to see that there is evidence of negative effects of competitive running even at a casual glance,

       

      No need to get all butt-hurt when doctors are telling you the truth. If you're running for health, probably 3-5 miles a day at a slow steady pace is optimal. And no, I'm not going to do that either.

        Running in a competitive way (running fast or far or both)  is like being any other kind of athlete - it's not the best thing for you in terms of health or longevity.

         

        I think this is in direct disagreement with the above statement.

         

        MTA (from the link above): Gold, silver and bronze medalists enjoyed roughly the same survival advantage, as did medalists in both endurance and mixed sports. Medalists in power sports such as gymnastics and tennis had a smaller, but still significant, advantage over the general population

        I dont sweat. I ooze liquid awesome.

        MrNamtor


        DON'T TREAD ON ME

          I think this is in direct disagreement with the above statement.

           

          MTA (from the link above): Gold, silver and bronze medalists enjoyed roughly the same survival advantage, as did medalists in both endurance and mixed sports. Medalists in power sports such as gymnastics and tennis had a smaller, but still significant, advantage over the general population

           

          That focuses on a very small and specialized group of people.

            That focuses on a very small and specialized group of people.

             

            I dont think that detracts from the argument - if you consider the overall population at large, competitive runners are a small and specialized group of people.

             

            My point is that its generally true that too much of anything isnt good for us .. what is "too much" is highly indiviualistic so sweeping generalizations dont do any justice to this sort of thing. And thats what the original article states, and your earlier post alludes to.

            I dont sweat. I ooze liquid awesome.

              This is quite bada$$ ... have you gone even lower?

               

              MTA: Just googled and found out this on the Guiness Records so that makes my question moot ... "

               

              Lowest heart rate The lowest resting heart beat on record is 28 bpm (beats per minute) and belongs to the cyclist Miguel Indurain in (Spain) who was tested at the University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain, in 1995. The average resting heart rate is 66-72 bpm, with most athletes having 40 bpm. Indur?in also has a lung capacity of 14 pints (8 liters) and a heart capable of pumping 88 pints (50 liters) of blood per minute--double that of a normal healthy man.

              How do people "register" for Guiness Book of World Records?  I THOUGHT the lowest HR ever RECORDED was actually Samson Kimonbuwa, at the time WSU, with 27bpm.  I kinda vaguely remember because I was talking to a friend of mine, a very good marathon guy, something like 2:21 with very small frame (I have a picture somewhere of him running side by side with Joan Benoit, I believe, in Chicago marathon way back) and he said his was actually 26, lower than the Kenyan's.  

               

              Nevertheless, 29 IS bada$$.  Mine went down to 37 and that was the lowest ever (those were the days...).  I believe Peter Snell had his with 35.  Of course, HR alone doesn't mean much to the actual performance.  Barry Magee, Peter's teammate whom he trained many of his long runs together, had relatively high HR of 64.  Being a bronze medalist in the Olympic marathon, that's a bit surprising.  Of course, if I remember it correctly, Jim Ryun had his somewhere up 64 or 65.

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