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Bike advice (Read 2146 times)


Awesome

    Good thinking. If you do not like the way you are being treated in the first shop you walk into, turn around and walk out and find another one. You can not overestimate service after the sale. I drive 2.5 hours to my bike shop just because of his comittment to service Wink
    Well, I went this morning to Ace Wheelworks in Davis/Porter and was very happy with the service, I even made them measure my a$$, because how can you refuse the assometer? I have the bike on hold while I think about it. It's a Canondale from 1999 (or so), so it was relatively cheap ($799 - eek). I'm blanking on what kind of parts it had, but the woman at the store said the parts were nice enough that she'd probably upgrade the frame before the parts. Of course, she could tell me anything and I'd believe it. All I know is that it was REALLY nice to ride - I'm used to my husband's crapper, and my sister's Specialized hybrid.


    Team Effort

      Well, I ........ Of course, she could tell me anything and I'd believe it. All I know is that it was REALLY nice to ride - I'm used to my husband's crapper, and my sister's Specialized hybrid.
      Sounds like you got a good bike to start with and don't worry. you will learn the names of the various component sets that are available and what's on your bike. You got the important part " it was REALLY nice to ride". Now go buy some good quality cycling bibs or shorts and jerseys, Pearl Izumi or Giordana come to mind, cycling shoes and get on the road. Good luck Big grin
      www.runninngahead.com/groups/5000MC/forum
      Bike99


      Do I look important?

        I agree with the fact that you HAVE to find a good bike shop. They're out there. A good bike shop will measure you up, take the time to show you the options available in your price range, and hopefully teach you a few of the basic differences between models. Not unlike getting properly fitted in running shoes. And another reason to shop at a local bike shop, they probably assembled the bike, so when something comes a bit loose in the first week or month they can fix it up for you no problem. Try to score a 1yr free tune-ups deal with the purchase as cables stretch and they'll need little tweaks. Lastly, before you get over your head with componentry, chain tools, bike shoes, or shaving grams off your ride.... throw a helmet on your melon, wrap a strap around your right pant leg, and go for a ride.
        Nobody cares what you didn't do.


        Head Procrastinator

          Hi all, new here and wanting to weigh in. Like one of the posters said, you can't put a price on a great LBS. Service after sale is more important than the lowest price IMHO. I finally broke down and bought a good bike this year and the difference in a bike that fits properly to enjoyment of cycling ratio is HUGE. After riding a few times when I told the LBS that the seat hurt and my lower neck hurt the tech raised the handlebars (which entailed unwrapping them and making the cables longer) at no charge and his partner swapped out my seat, at no charge either and told me if I didn't love it we'd find one that I did love. Those things made a big difference and I am now a happy cyclist (except that it's been to crappy to ride lately ) Barb
          ~ My Profile~ The avatar is happy BOC wootcats
          TheProFromDover


          TheProFromDover

            ...I have the bike on hold while I think about it. It's a Canondale from 1999 (or so), so it was relatively cheap ($799 - eek). I'm blanking on what kind of parts it had, but the woman at the store said the parts were nice enough that she'd probably upgrade the frame before the parts. Of course, she could tell me anything and I'd believe it...
            Erica, I also have opinions on bikes (I have opinions on everything). First that, bike is pretty old. A lot has happened in 9 years. I can't believe that price is good considering the age. Buying new but not this year's model is the best way to save some bucks. But don't go more than say, 3 years back. Second, a few of the big companies (Trek, Specialized) sell an entry level, road geometry, (maybe woman specific), with aerobars. If you are serious riding only for tri training and racing, I'd look for shifters on the aerobars. If you want a road bike and will simply use it for tri's, then I'd stick with STI shifters (in the brake handles) and aerobars. I should be able to find a link or two showing examples of these bikes. Hope this helps, I know you are liking what you test rode, Craig
            -Craig ced53 at yahoo dot com


            go Care Bear go!

              I am so new to cycling myself, that I probably have no business posting here, but here goes... The LBS is definitely the place to go to learn and experiment. I must have spent hours at multiple bike shops last summer before making my final purchase decision. I had made myself finish my first tri on my chumpy slow comfort bike before I'd let myself buy a road bike. I had an awesome experience with my triathlon and knew I wanted an upgrade. So off I went. Not knowing much at all about bikes, I walked into one bike shop after another and found the NICEST, most HELPFUL and PATIENT sales guys (mostly guys, though one gal!) to answer all my stupid questions and let me test ride many bikes with no pressure. I asked tons of questions, but so did they - to understand my needs. It was a great experience all around. By the time I got my new road bike, Mr CO was all about it too and he got a bike! We really enjoy riding together on the amazing trails we have nearby. Do your research, take some test rides, ask questions and you'll end up with a good bike for you. Only you know what that will be. Whatever your budget is, allow about another $200 or so for pedals, shoes, etc. It still amazes me how many doo-dads and extras you will want for cycling. It's much more complicated than a pair of sneakers or a swimsuit and goggles! But it sure is fun!
              TheProFromDover


              TheProFromDover

                Wow, Carrie, that was fast! Now we just have to find the others. Where's Erica? Craig
                -Craig ced53 at yahoo dot com


                Head Procrastinator

                  I missed that the OP was going to buy an 8 year old bike. NOOOOO, listen to ThePro. Can't even believe they have that old of a bike hanging around and are trying to push it off on you. You can get a this years bike for that price.
                  ~ My Profile~ The avatar is happy BOC wootcats
                  Cashmason


                    I didn't realize that Hally had joined us on the Dark Side ( triathlons). Welcome Hally. And the Pro is right a 9 year old bike is a bit old for that kind of money. Cannondale makes a great bike, but technology for shifters and gears has gotten a lot better in the last 9 years.


                    Head Procrastinator

                      Hey Cash Smile Not sure about the tri thing but I am cycling heavily......well was when the weather permitted but will again!! Now I just have to get myself back in the pool.
                      ~ My Profile~ The avatar is happy BOC wootcats
                      TriAndStopMe


                        I didn't realize that Hally had joined us on the Dark Side ( triathlons). Welcome Hally. And the Pro is right a 9 year old bike is a bit old for that kind of money. Cannondale makes a great bike, but technology for shifters and gears has gotten a lot better in the last 9 years.
                        Hey, Hally, I didn't know you'd start riding, too. You may as well give in and do a triathlon. It's great fun and it's great cross training. Erica, I purchased a 1998 or 1999 Cannondale for seven or eight hundred dollars... but I bought it five or six years ago. Yes, it's quite possible the bike you're looking was a more expensive model when it first came out. But still, I'm with Pro and everyone else. You're much better off getting something new or at least much newer. another Barb Wink
                        triquest


                          I started doing sprint tris last year. I hadn't ridden a bike since I was in 1st grade, so I went with a hybrid, which I thought would be more stable and safer. (I read a triathlon book that said for your first tris any old bike will do.) I bought a Trek and it was very good from the stability point of view. Nice bike, but slow. If I had to do it again, I would have bought a road bike. The hybrid is not competitive in a race. I had the worst bike time of anyone in 2 of my races and near the worst in the others. I'd come out of the water in the top third to top half of the racers and then just get obliterated on the bike. Whoosh! Whoosh! Whoosh! Everyone going by me. The extra effort on the bike further handicaps you on the run. I volunteered at a tri this summer, directing bikers on the course. First come the studs with the aerodynamic helmets and $5,000 bikes, then come the pack on road bikes, and then ten minutes later come the hybrids and mountain bikes. It's like two different races or like running a road race with a fifty pound sack on your back. I'm looking for an entry level road bike this year.


                          3Days4Cure

                            Anyone else? Big grin did
                            If you don't mind-- small variation. I want a bike I can use primarily to commute to work (4 miles each way), with the possibility of making some of the morning rides longer to get a cross-train. To carry my suit et al, I'll be wearing a backpack (geeky, yes, but necessary). I'd like to be able to use it to do some longer weekend rides, but I'm years from considering doing any tris or racing. Chris

                            Chris

                            2014 Goals 
                            Raise $3,000 for the Komen 3-Day (and walk 60 miles in 3 days)
                            Run at least one race

                             


                            Team HTFU NCTR Driver

                              If you don't mind-- small variation. I want a bike I can use primarily to commute to work (4 miles each way), with the possibility of making some of the morning rides longer to get a cross-train. To carry my suit et al, I'll be wearing a backpack (geeky, yes, but necessary). I'd like to be able to use it to do some longer weekend rides, but I'm years from considering doing any tris or racing. Chris
                              Get a cyclocross bike. You can do ANYTHING on a 'cross bike. You have road bike geometry, slightly lower-than-road bike gearing, road handlebars (which are the most versatile - lots of hand positions), but fattish tires (like 32 to 40 mm wide, vs. 23-28 for a typical roadie). They're built heavier, so they'll handle the loads of commuting. You can take trails or gravel roads. Put skinny tires on, and you've got a road bike. Get crazy, and you can do the most brutal sport on wheels - cyclocross racing. did




                              3Days4Cure

                                Thank you! That helps a ton! (I'm nuts, so who knows, maybe one day I'll do the most brutal sport on wheels).

                                Chris

                                2014 Goals 
                                Raise $3,000 for the Komen 3-Day (and walk 60 miles in 3 days)
                                Run at least one race

                                 

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