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Coaches (Read 1197 times)


Idiot

    Is the way somebody runs really a relevant thing relative to coaching?  I guess I'm in the camp that believes that form is something that finds itself as a product of running more and running faster, rather than by somebody "fixing" it.  That would not at all be a deal breaker for me.  

     

    I have a coach, and he's local.  But he only sees me run for the last tenth of a mile on my Saturday morning runs (he owns the running shop our club is based out of).  We talk regularly about workouts, how my body feels, other stuff.  I feel like my willingness to be honest with him (and not lie about the last two months of training) is more key than his ability/willingness to watch me run around in circles.

    I decided that if I'm going to call myself a runner, I should probably run.


    Prince of Fatness

      In fact, if someone saw my form I am quite confident he/she would not agree to coach me. 

       

      Agreed.

      Semi-retired.

        If someone saw your form they would think there was an eclipse.

         

          I think a coach would be good if you struggled with motivation or were prone to injury.  Other than that, you guys are all the professional help I need. 

           

          I've thought this too.  But I've become more open to the possibility, because I think there's something to saving us from ourselves.  Jeff has alluded this to me himself and I can see that.  I know enough to be dangerous sometimes, and I can get extremely motivated.  It has led me to some really good results and some really poor races where I peaked two months early then got hurt.  I tend to race workouts even though I know I shouldn't.  And while I feel I know the 95% of what I need to know to get in shape, I don't exactly know how to peak for races.  These are all things that I know I could be helped with coaching-wise that have nothing to do with form. 

           

            I have been running with a local coach for about 8 months, and it's been the best 8 months of running since high school (20 years ago).  Actually, better than high school.  I'd gone from running solo for years and years to running with a local club, then made the jump to a coached program.  I get an individualized training plan and one-on-one guidance in workouts, but for me the best part has been the "moderated" group runs/workouts, four or five days a week.  Can't really describe how he does it, but the coach creates a good mood that makes the hard workouts feel productive and the easy days fun.  Somehow better than the running store groups and the local clubs (and splinter groups therefrom).   www.personalrunningsolutions.com

             

            I followed a canned plan diligently until my first marathon, and about mile 22 I promised I'd check out a coaching program.  But, I wouldn't urge it on anyone.  The only thing I'd suggest is trying something new every once in awhile, unless you are 100% satisfied with your running performance (which probably means you ought to try several new things).

              I have been running with a local coach for about 8 months, and it's been the best 8 months of running since high school (20 years ago).  Actually, better than high school.  I'd gone from running solo for years and years to running with a local club, then made the jump to a coached program.  I get an individualized training plan and one-on-one guidance in workouts, but for me the best part has been the "moderated" group runs/workouts, four or five days a week.  Can't really describe how he does it, but the coach creates a good mood that makes the hard workouts feel productive and the easy days fun.  Somehow better than the running store groups and the local clubs (and splinter groups therefrom).   www.personalrunningsolutions.com

               

              I followed a canned plan diligently until my first marathon, and about mile 22 I promised I'd check out a coaching program.  But, I wouldn't urge it on anyone.  The only thing I'd suggest is trying something new every once in awhile, unless you are 100% satisfied with your running performance (which probably means you ought to try several new things).

               

              I just interviewed a friend of mine that now is an online running coach.  Using a coach wasn't anything I ever have considered, but if I were ever to get serious about running a marathon, I think it would be smart to have a coach.  I think having a coach is more about balance than anything.  They can keep you from doing too much, or too little.

                They can keep you from doing too much, or too little.

                Yeah, that has been key for me.

                "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

                  Yeah, that has been key for me.

                   

                  This is true for me too. My coach is very good about ensuring I don't over-train, and/or listening to my feedback for signs of over-training.   My coach's philosophy is simply "keep the ball rolling." He believes in doing less not more in terms of quality, but he's a big believer in high mileage. . He'd rather you stay healthy and not miss training, than to risk doing too much and getting injured and side-lined for weeks or months and having to rebuild. This isn't to say all my workouts are easy, as that would be the farthest from the truth.  However, he ensures that everything is part of a progression and there's adequate easy mileage between each key day. 

                   

                  I really wish I had this coach when I was young (HS and college) and competing. I feel like I could have done so much better.  Looking back I feel like I was nearly always over-trained and doing the wrong training (way too much gut busting speed work IMO). I should have done more tempo efforts, and more easy mileage.  Perhaps in my next life :-)

                    Nice little article on a great coach.

                     

                    "It's an attitude, it's an approach, it's the way you deal with an athlete. It's the environment in which you bring them, that's what is important. It's not handing them a program or standing on the side with a whistle and a watch," he said.


                    Fat butt on couch

                      It's not handing them a program 

                       

                       

                      Well that just eliminated 90% of internet "coaches" right there...

                      "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                       

                        I'll just have God coach me. 

                        They say golf is like life, but don't believe them. Golf is more complicated than that. "If I am still standing at the end of the race, hit me with a Board and knock me down, because that means I didn't run hard enough" If a lot of people gripped a knife and fork the way they do a golf club, they'd starve to death. "Don't fear moving slowly forward...fear standing still."

                          Only thing I will add to the discussion is to make sure the coach has time for you.

                           

                          They may be VERY knowledgeable, have great training plans and post MANY wonderful things on message boards.  However, if they don't make time to review your progress/results and make adjustments, then they aren't very helpful...

                           

                          Just my $0.02.

                          And you can quote me as saying I was mis-quoted. Groucho Marx

                           

                          Rob

                            I wouldn't be the same runner without the coaches I've had. I find the main thing they do is act like blinkers on a horse and keep me working at the right level of intensity (when life allows!). So they've told me I'm an idiot when I've planned to do races in too close succession but they've also told me to suck it up and not take the easy option during sessions. Having someone who can look at your fitness and training with a relatively objective manner is invaluable, in my opinion.

                             

                            I'd strongly agree about making sure the coach has time for you. You'll appreciate having someone there for you during the bad times and the good.

                             

                            Vaguely related: charging  for coaching is such an alien concept in the UK running scene. I know it makes perfect sense (you'd pay a trampoline coach or a gymnastics coach) but it still makes me uncomfortable at the thought that any coach I've had would ask for money at any point.

                              I'll just have God coach me. 

                               

                              Just because [he/she/it/they] got Ryan Hall an Olympic spot, doesn't mean [he/she/it/they]'[s/re] going to give you one too.

                                Just because [he/she/it/they] got Ryan Hall an Olympic spot, doesn't mean [he/she/it/they]'[s/re] going to give you one too.

                                 

                                Crap.

                                 

                                I thought I was set for 2016.

                                They say golf is like life, but don't believe them. Golf is more complicated than that. "If I am still standing at the end of the race, hit me with a Board and knock me down, because that means I didn't run hard enough" If a lot of people gripped a knife and fork the way they do a golf club, they'd starve to death. "Don't fear moving slowly forward...fear standing still."

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