Diet Pop impact on weight (Read 1719 times)

    So, I am pretty much a Diet Pepsi & Diet Mt. Dew addict.  I love the stuff.  However, I know it is not good for me.  I have heard it before, but I just read an article about how difficult it is to lose weight while drinking diet sodas.  Have any of you quit drinking diet pop and saw a drop in your weight? 

      I've noticed that when I don't drink them, and drink water and unsweetened tea instead, I don't crave junky stuff as much.

        That makes sense.  I am actually running quite a few miles training for a hundred miler and know if I could drop a few pounds, it would be so much easier!  However, I drink the no calorie diet pop...and then add the munchies.  Good food for thought! Wink


        That's Ms Squeak to you!

          I love my diet Sprite, but I haven't heard anything about diet drinks having an adverse effect on weight loss, only taht it's bad for your teeth and a few other vague health scare-ish stuff that I've heard. Can you link the article for a sneaky-peek?

           

          Smile

          xor


            I love my diet Sprite, but I haven't heard anything about diet drinks having an adverse effect on weight loss, only taht it's bad for your teeth and a few other vague health scare-ish stuff that I've heard. Can you link the article for a sneaky-peek?

             

            Smile

             

            Zim zala bim.

             

            (and shut up. Yes, I linked Huffington Post)

             


            I'm back!

              Researchers found that the diet soda drinkers had waist circumference increases of 70 percent greater than those who non-diet soda drinkers.

               

              Huh. I wonder what diet sodas do to the ability to string words into a coherent sentence.

              xor


                Oh there are old articles about how nutri-sweet made holes in your brain.  They probably meant Broca's area***.

                 

                Here's our buddy Mercola now.

                 

                 

                *** yes, I realize that's speech.

                 

                localoutoftowner


                  This is the quote from the actual study.

                   

                   

                  " “These results suggest that heavy aspartame exposure might potentially directly contribute to increased blood glucose levels, and thus contribute to the associations observed between diet soda consumption and the risk of diabetes in humans,” Dr. Fernandes said.

                   

                   

                  Sounds convincing.

                   

                  http://www.uthscsa.edu/hscnews/singleformat2.asp?newID=3861

                   

                  This one is even better.

                   

                  Not to mention the lack of details and control regarding the study done on the elderly. Took their measurements and then sent them on their way. Met again 9.5 years later? How is that even considered a "study"?

                   

                   


                  localoutoftowner


                    I've never actually read a real study on it, but what I've heard is that the soda leads to increased appetite or a craving for carbohydrates.

                     

                     

                     

                    I'm not advocating diet drinks or artificial sugar. The phosphorus in soda destroys teeth. Water is the way to go.

                    Eoin


                      From what I've heard, it's the sucrose in the drink (diet or not) that will give an increased risk of pancreatic cancer and other non-desirable things.

                      I know a relative who at 17 has had to have two teeth removed or replaced due to excessive fizzy drink consumption.

                      In short, don't even drink "diet" drinks, just have water or natural fruit juice, your body will thank you in the long run!

                      Eoin

                      Next goal: Sub4hr in DCM

                       

                      http://eobeara.blogspot.com

                        I've got my own theories, along with a love of soda, diet and regular.

                         

                        Have you ever noticed in restaurants that the thin people are drinking water, the not-so-thin are drinking diet or regular soda?  Additionally, when on the road these people are getting the extra large versions, as if your body could possibly need an extra large serving of any liquid.  I think the mentality of extra-large anything is part of the problem, even if what you're consuming is very low on calories, your body does not need to be eating/drinking all day long.  I know for me, if I get into the habit of a 20oz diet coke every morning, it's very easy to switch that to the regular version, and top it off with a donut.  I've trained my body to take in excessive soda and only drink water out of necessity, which is pretty gross (have strong teeth so far). 


                        A Dance with Monkeys

                          There have been small flawed studies like this that come down the pipe for years.  There are a lot of studies like this that show that among diet drink consumers, total calorie intake is greater than among non-diet drink consumers.  One theory is that the artificial sweeteners stimulate the brain's sweet centers but not the satiety centers, which leads to a re-regulation such that (over time) you need to eat more sweet to satisfy you.


                          A Dance with Monkeys

                            From what I've heard, it's the sucrose in the drink (diet or not) that will give an increased risk of pancreatic cancer

                             

                            1. There is no sucrose in diet drinks

                            2. There is no evidence that I know of showing an association between sucrose or diet drinks and pancreatic cancer

                              There have been small flawed studies like this that come down the pipe for years.  There are a lot of studies like this that show that among diet drink consumers, total calorie intake is greater than among non-diet drink consumers.  One theory is that the artificial sweeteners stimulate the brain's sweet centers but not the satiety centers, which leads to a re-regulation such that (over time) you need to eat more sweet to satisfy you.

                               

                              This is totally irellevant in my opinion.  If you drink a diet drink, and physically do not consume more sweets, then there is not an issue.  Everytime one of these "studies" hits the news, it makes it sound like the diet drink is what is causing the weight gain.  When it's really the "user", eating more because of the diet drink.

                              Jeff

                                Everytime one of these "studies" hits the news, it makes it sound like the diet drink is what is causing the weight gain.  When it's really the "user", eating more because of the diet drink.

                                 

                                He he he. Cause and effect? Your logic is somewhat twisted.