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Frustrated (Read 265 times)

yomonk1


    Hello all. First post. I really could use some sound advice. I am 47 years old and a restarter. I used to be captain of my soccer team back in high school and ran well and frequently, but shortly after discovered beer and pizza. Needless to say 165lb turned to 200lbs and as of last year 240lbs. Needless to say, my lifestyle wasn't as active. I could hike ok and  I had tried C25K a couple times but quit due to shin stress.

     

    Fast forward to the present. I have turned around a little, down to 195lbs and moving much more frequently. Walking every day, logging a few miles a day. I have also restarted C25K a couple months ago, but I'm having a horrible time progressing. I Can do weeks 1-2 pretty well with fatigue as expected. Week three is hard, but I tried a couple times on week 4 and I am totally exhausted, losing form toward end of the 5 min jog. My legs and muscles feel fine, but endurance is horrible. I struggle breathing at end of that run. I recover well, but I'm started to get frustrated that I can't progress. I've spent a couple weeks on week 1 and 2 and now with the horrible experience on week 4, I've found myself going back to week 1 and 2 so I can at least get some jogs in and not give up.

     

    Any thoughts? Advice? Anything else I can do? I'm getting really good hydration, as part of my weight loss has been drinking lots of water. Thanks in advance and I look forward to sharing successes at a later point, when hopefully I run my first 5k

    Apple1


      I am new to running also and I just wanted to post some encouragement to you. I think it is awesome that you are working towards becoming more fit and healthy. I am 49 and started about 6-7 weeks ago and I am hoping to lose another 20 pounds in the next year.

      I don't feel qualified to give you any training advice but I will tell you what I did. I stuck with the C25K for about three weeks and then I just started with Runkeeper. I just did my own run/walk segments based on how I feel that day. I have progressed up at a pace I am comfortable with. The best advice I have gotten is to run slow really slow. I am sure you will get some great advice here from those with lots of experience. Good luck

        Congratulations to you for getting back to an active lifestyle.

         

        I was in a similar situation in my 40s, exercising very little, working a lot, commuting, kids, etc. I finally said enough's enough at 49 and like you, started C25K. It took me three attempts over five months before I finished it and ran a 5K a month later. I remember feeling the same way, getting a few weeks in and being exhausted, but still trying to keep to the schedule. At that point it would become too much, and I would quit. So, I like that you're not afraid of repeating an easier week, or even dropping back a week, just to maintain your momentum. That's great; think of it as a rest week, which is something runners do anyways.

         

        I also like that you're walking daily. I greatly underestimated how little fitness I had and indeed, how much my health had deteriorated and how significant a task even walking a few miles every day would be. So don't consider walking less significant or not as contributing to your fitness.

         

        Finally, as Apple1 suggested, run slowly, making sure you're able to sing Happy Birthday or something equally inane. Try to find someone to run and walk with, even occasionally, and try to run at a pace that allows you to carry on a conversation the entire outing.

         

        Don't give up! My first year was the hardest by far. Your body is going through tremendous change. Get plenty of sleep too. Good luck!


        Half Fanatic #9874

          I started C25K when I was 52 years old back in 2008.  It was in the fall because I wanted to do a Jingle Bell Run as my first 5k.  I didn't have any of the fancy running gadgetry that I have now, just a stopwatch, and I was running really fast in the beginning.  I had a hard time making progress unless I slowed down.  The few times I did it on the treadmill, I discovered I was best at 4.3 mph and ended up settling on that as my "go-to" speed.  As it turns out, that's a decent pace for me all the time and the one I've finished most anything over 5k even now.  Maybe try slowing down.  Or try doing 2:30 run/:30 walks instead of running the whole 5 minutes.  Just a suggestion.

          haroldjiii


          wrongplace@thewrongtime

            If you're somewhere hot, the summer weather plays a big factor in your endurance. Take it easy. At this time of year, don't pay so much attention to the time. Pay attention to your breathing and back off when it starts to get really deep. Push just a little harder when you feel your body is ready. As the temperatures and humidity drop, your body will be able to put more towards the running and less towards just simply cooling down. I do most of my running in Taiwan in 80s and high humidity. I'm on vacation back in the States and it's a big difference in the early morning.

            Most importantly, you'll make progress if you put in the time. Learning to listen to your body will be a big help as you improve. Keep at it.

              Breathing hard when running means one is running anaerobically. In the beginning, and even after having a lot of experience, one should run most of one's volume aerobically. It's the focus on the aerobic system that will give one the endurance one seeks.

               

              There are several ways that people go to keep themselves aerobic, and several beliefs to on how deep into the aerobic system one should go (the lower the heart rate (HR), the deeper one goes into the aerobic system). Generally, if you can run between 65% to 75% of your maximum heart rate (or below), you'll be staying mostly aerobic. The Type 1 aerobic fibers will get a nice workout. These fibers for the most part are what give you endurance, and use mostly fat for energy, as opposed to glycogen.

               

              Others will just use their breathing to stay aerobic. Using a talk test. When aerobic, one should be able to sing the entire lyrics of Rosemary, Lily, And The Jack Of Hearts (B. Dylan) without having to catch ones breath.

               

              Whether one uses a heart rate  monitor (HRM) or just breath, one has to usually slow down in the beginning to keep at that aerobic heart rate or level of breathing. With a HRM, one will slow down in the beginning, and if the volume is not too stressful, but enough to keep one progressing, then one should get faster at the same aerobic HR.  Or with breath, one will get faster while still being able to sing the entire lyrics to Tweeter And The Monkey Man (Traveling Wilbury's) without having to catch one's breath. The more those Type 1 fibers develop, the faster one gets while running aerobically. This translates to great endurance.

               

              Sometimes, beginners (overweight or not) need to alternate walking and running to stay aerobic. Sometimes, just walking until one can run is the way to go.

               

              Congrats on starting out. I urge all beginners to research aerobic vs. anaerobic running, RQ (fat/sugar ratio while running at different intensities), heart rate monitors, perceived exertion, training load, overtraining and how to avoid it, the effects of stress hormones from life and running, MAF, speed work and when to do it and how much, and the deliciousness of Korean spicy pork and Vietnamese pho.

               

              Good luck. 

              Coach Swift


                Exactly what Jimmy said, thankfully I don't need to basically retype this. If you're out of breath, you're out of the aerobic zone. If you are training to run a fast 5k, then sometimes you need to train the anaerobic Zone. But most hobby joggers have little/no need to be out of their aerobic Zone. Another bonus of the aerobic Zone, is the higher rates of burning calories :-)

                 

                Breathing hard when running means one is running anaerobically. In the beginning, and even after having a lot of experience, one should run most of one's volume aerobically. It's the focus on the aerobic system that will give one the endurance one seeks.

                 

                There are several ways that people go to keep themselves aerobic, and several beliefs to on how deep into the aerobic system one should go (the lower the heart rate (HR), the deeper one goes into the aerobic system). Generally, if you can run between 65% to 75% of your maximum heart rate (or below), you'll be staying mostly aerobic. The Type 1 aerobic fibers will get a nice workout. These fibers for the most part are what give you endurance, and use mostly fat for energy, as opposed to glycogen.

                 

                Others will just use their breathing to stay aerobic. Using a talk test. When aerobic, one should be able to sing the entire lyrics of Rosemary, Lily, And The Jack Of Hearts (B. Dylan) without having to catch ones breath.

                 

                Whether one uses a heart rate  monitor (HRM) or just breath, one has to usually slow down in the beginning to keep at that aerobic heart rate or level of breathing. With a HRM, one will slow down in the beginning, and if the volume is not too stressful, but enough to keep one progressing, then one should get faster at the same aerobic HR.  Or with breath, one will get faster while still being able to sing the entire lyrics to Tweeter And The Monkey Man (Traveling Wilbury's) without having to catch one's breath. The more those Type 1 fibers develop, the faster one gets while running aerobically. This translates to great endurance.

                 

                Sometimes, beginners (overweight or not) need to alternate walking and running to stay aerobic. Sometimes, just walking until one can run is the way to go.

                 

                Congrats on starting out. I urge all beginners to research aerobic vs. anaerobic running, RQ (fat/sugar ratio while running at different intensities), heart rate monitors, perceived exertion, training load, overtraining and how to avoid it, the effects of stress hormones from life and running, MAF, speed work and when to do it and how much, and the deliciousness of Korean spicy pork and Vietnamese pho.

                 

                Good luck. 

                Apple1


                  That article was very helpful. I now understand why after slowing down I was able to run so much further without stopping.

                  degregorius


                    If you're somewhere hot, the summer weather plays a big factor in your endurance. Take it easy. At this time of year, don't pay so much attention to the time. Pay attention to your breathing and back off when it starts to get really deep. Push just a little harder when you feel your body is ready. As the temperatures and humidity drop, your body will be able to put more towards the running and less towards just simply cooling down. I do most of my running in Taiwan in 80s and high humidity. I'm on vacation back in the States and it's a big difference in the early morning.

                    Most importantly, you'll make progress if you put in the time. Learning to listen to your body will be a big help as you improve. Keep at it.

                     

                    I agree with what is said here.  Also - if possible - change the routes you run.  Running the same route will get dull.  Switch up.  If you have access to a track, try that.  If there is a trail available that you haven't been on, try that.

                    yomonk1


                      Thanks for all the responses. I'll do some more work and try some of your suggestions. As far as going slow, I do run pretty slow already, still have to take lots of walk breaks. On the first day I went back to week one, after week four, I sped up my pace for that first day and did pretty well with it, in essence, switching things up a bit. As it is right now, I struggle to run a half mile continuously. Can only put together about 5 min max.

                      A work in progress. Not giving up though. Gotta push through this. Thanks again.

                      GinnyinPA


                        Starting out, it can help to jog at a pace that is just barely above your walking pace.  I know it feels absurdly slow, but you'll find that you can go farther if you go more slowly.  When you can comfortably do the distance, then you can speed up.  But to begin with, you need to just learn to pace yourself to a comfortable easy conversational pace. Some people find that it helps to breathe in to a count of 3 and out 4, or vice versa.  That's how slow you should be running. If you are breathing 2/2, you're going too fast.

                        yomonk1


                          Starting out, it can help to jog at a pace that is just barely above your walking pace.  I know it feels absurdly slow, but you'll find that you can go farther if you go more slowly.  When you can comfortably do the distance, then you can speed up.  But to begin with, you need to just learn to pace yourself to a comfortable easy conversational pace. Some people find that it helps to breathe in to a count of 3 and out 4, or vice versa.  That's how slow you should be running. If you are breathing 2/2, you're going too fast.

                           

                          I have been breathing at a 2/2, working on finding my breath cycle that works. I will definitely slow down and see what happens. I can walk forever, just having a hard time jogging it

                          yomonk1


                            Just to follow up. I did take everyone's advice, in one way or another. I ended up running with my buddy's girlfriend, who is a beginner also, and she made me slow way down. I found that I could have conversation, and finish the run without extreme fatigue. The next day, I took that same pace and went out for a mile and a half. Havent been able to do that for 30 years! I was amazed! Since then, I've been able to finish all my runs and progress in time and distance, yesterday, running my first (unofficial) 5k in 35 min. I'm not going to win any races, but I am going to finish them! Thanks so much for the advice and I can't wait to progress further. If anyone wants to link to me on Strava, I'm Robert Hedge

                              Great to hear, Robert. By the way, RA has a group on Strava if you want to join.

                              yomonk1


                                Yes! Just search on Strava, I assume?

                                 

                                 

                                Great to hear, Robert. By the way, RA has a group on Strava if you want to join.

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