Core Exercises (Read 1403 times)


I'm back!

    I can think of no better definition of stupidity for any athlete than the fraud perpetuated under the banner of core stability exercises.

     

    Now and then behind all the crap I sometimes think that you might possibly have something actually interesting and relevant to say. Thanks; you've disabused me of that notion.

    ud32


      This is what Salazar has his runners do: http://www.therapeuticassociates.com/sports-medicine/stability-routine/. I've started incorporating these at the gym twice a week.

       

      Thanks for the link - some different exercises to mix up things up for sure!


      LimpingBehind.com

        You're right, an unstable core is much better.

         

        Unstable (dictionary definition):  fail, or give way; not stable, not held in a secure position : likely to move or fall

         

        When I think of my spine health, I want to think of it "giving way".   :/  Two can play the dictionary game.

         

        I can think of no better definition of stupidity for any athlete than the fraud perpetuated under the banner of core stability exercises.

         

        And you can start with the dictionary definition of stable; constant, unmoving, or resistant to change.

         

         Want a discount code for the San Francisco marathon?  Message me :)

        NHLA


          T'ai Chi is a great core workout.

          Hire a good personal trainer that runs for just three mos. Learn proper form. Core work becomes automatic.

          sport jester


          Biomimeticist

            You're right, an unstable core is much better.

             

            Unstable (dictionary definition):  fail, or give way; not stable, not held in a secure position : likely to move or fall

             

            When I think of my spine health, I want to think of it "giving way".   :/  Two can play the dictionary game.

             

             

            Then maybe you should look up the dictionary definition of maneuverable instead of letting your brain try and think of a pathetic yet useless comeback...

            Experts said the world is flat

            Experts said that man would never fly

            Experts said we'd never go to the moon

             

            Name me one of those "experts"...

             

            History never remembers the name of experts; just the innovators who had the guts to challenge and prove the "experts" wrong


            Queen of 3rd Place

               

              Now and then behind all the crap I sometimes think that you might possibly have something actually interesting and relevant to say. Thanks; you've disabused me of that notion.

               

              I have always secretly adored you. (blush)

              2013 Valley Runner of the Year Series: Feb 16 5K (4 points out of 10) ... Mar 2 10K (20/30)... Mar 16 4Mi (21/30) ... Apr 6 10K (DNS) ... Apr 21 2Mi (5/10) ... May 11 5Mi (21/30)... Jun 8 1Mi (13/20) ... Jun 16 6Mi (22/30) ... Sep 28 10K (14/20) ... Oct 5 5K (7/10) ...Oct 12 5Mi (16/20) ... Oct 20 5K (0/10) = 3rd Place, Women's Senior Division

              stshipley


                My two cents:

                 

                The Jay Johnson lunge matrix is an awesome way to warm up for runs or stretching. I especially find it useful on race days.

                 

                As for "core" work, I find yoga to be helpful. I don't do any yoga poses that target the "core" in terms of strength, but I do some poses that target core *flexibility* because I've found, just as Jay says in the article posted by Dakota above (http://www.runnersworld.com/race-training/give-me-15-minutes), I was a much better athlete before I started running, and dedication to running alone has weakened my flexibility, especially in my back. Yoga has restored a lot of my flexibility.

                 

                Also, yoga poses almost always require some "core stability." For example, your basic yoga plank works the arms and shoulders quite nicely, but it also "works the core" too, you just don't detect that it's "working" the core because all your brain senses is the burning in your arms. this is true of a lot of other yoga strength poses.

                 

                YMMV.

                 

                -STS


                I'm back!

                   I have always secretly adored you. (blush)

                   

                  It's the sequins, isn't it?

                    It doesn't get much more simple than holding a plank, forearm or full form. Just make sure you're doing it right and holding your core in tight to protect your back.

                    I don't half-ass anything

                     

                    "I have several close friends who have run marathons, a word that is actually derived from two Swahili words: mara, which means 'to die a horrible death' and thon, which means 'for a stupid T-shirt.' Look it up." - Celia Rivenbark, You Can't Drink All Day if You Don't Start in the Morning

                     

                    lesliel


                      spam


                      Old , Ugly and slow

                        Best core exercise - deadlifts without a belt.

                         

                        Did some last night standing on a block.

                        pr's 5k 20.08, 5 mile 31:20, 10k  41.19  all done in the 80's

                         

                        2014goals   1300  miles  , 190 pounds , deadlift 400 touch my toes

                        scappodaqui


                        rather be sprinting

                          Best core exercise - deadlifts without a belt.

                           

                          Did some last night standing on a block.

                           

                          I love deficit deadlifts.  But don't you find that they absolutely torch your hamstrings?  I get SUCH bad hamstring DOMS from deadlifting I actually have trouble keeping up with my running when I'm doing higher mileage simply due to soreness.  Could be just me, or the fact that I'm limited to like 20-rep sets at 50% of 1 RM while my femur finishes healing.

                           

                          I don't understand why people say core work is useless.  That's ridiculous.  So much of running comes from the core and relies upon control of core rotation and stability.  One great core exercise is resisted sprints. Wink  Or sled pulls/pushes.  Talk about running specific.

                           

                          But I also do, let's see... obviously squats and deadlifts, chinups, hanging leg raises or hanging crunches, v-ups and variations with weight, weighted decline crunches, kettlebell Russian Twists, Renegade Rows, med ball wall slams or slams against the floor, pushup variations of all kinds to hit core specifically, plank, side plank, superman, back extensions, cable-weighted or band-resisted crunches... the trick for me is, I don't typically do the SAME couple of exercises every workout.  I do 2-3 different ones, 3 short sets of each, 2 or maaaybe 3 times per week after my regular lifting session.

                           

                          Seems to work pretty well.  I should mention that I'm particularly aware of core because I had stomach surgery last year.  Recovering from that made me realize how vital a strong core is to running; when I came back post-surgery I had so many aches, pains, and limitations due to my weak abdominals.  I could even feel how weak abs held me back in sprinting as upper body form was all out of whack.  I was hunching my shoulders and collapsing aroudn the weak center, and therefore lost a lot of my finishing speed.  Form is important, and core is a huge part of that.  Having a strong core will make you a more efficient, and therefore both faster and less easily injured, runner.

                          PRs: 5k 19:25, mile 5:38, HM 1:30:56

                          Lifting PRs: back squat 176 lb


                          Old , Ugly and slow

                            Deadlifts off a block does make my hamstrings sore.

                             

                            I only do them every 4-5 days.

                             

                            Right  now I am trying to build up my miles and am just running for health.

                             

                            I am also tying to lose weight and get stronger.

                             

                            Even If I get to my goal weight of 190 I will still be too heavy to be a good runner.

                            pr's 5k 20.08, 5 mile 31:20, 10k  41.19  all done in the 80's

                             

                            2014goals   1300  miles  , 190 pounds , deadlift 400 touch my toes

                            sport jester


                            Biomimeticist

                              And yet the basic question doesn't get asked; How does core stability training improve your running technique?

                               

                              Simply answer; it doesn't

                               

                              Its a far more logical path to correct what causes hip instability while running than having the idiocy to think that any exercise of the hip structure will solve the problem. Better yet, show me a clinical study that proves its impact on running economy.

                              Experts said the world is flat

                              Experts said that man would never fly

                              Experts said we'd never go to the moon

                               

                              Name me one of those "experts"...

                               

                              History never remembers the name of experts; just the innovators who had the guts to challenge and prove the "experts" wrong

                                Dude, please stop.