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Graston physiotherapy (Read 2157 times)

    Has anyone ever had it?  I am getting it on my IT band. I only had one treatment and I'm very bruised. Any physiotherapists here?

    Suffering Benefiting from mature onset exercise addiction and low aerobic endorphin release threshold. Hoping there is no cure.


    Bugs

      Has anyone ever had it?  I am getting it on my IT band. I only had one treatment and I'm very bruised. Any physiotherapists here?

       

       

      Yes, many times, on IT band just once. It is very effective treatment. IT band bruises badly because it is tendon, don't worry.  Also, not all graston doctors are equal. The treatment is far more effective when doctor is not too rough, uses their smaller tools, and understands sports injuries. Don't let them touch you with the big crow bar.

      Bugs

        I had it on my Achilles 1-2x weekly for about a month.  Hurts, but no bruising ... but then, I don't bruise easily.  A friend had it done above/below her knee (IT band, I think), and she bruised badly.

        “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman


        I'm back!

          I've had it several times on my vastus lateralis, mostly with the small tools, once with the big one. But it never hurt or bruised at all. It's a LOT less painful than cross frictions. OTOH I'm not sure it helped at all either.

          xor


            I have a question.

             

            If you have had it "many times", why do you consider it effective?

             

            (I promise I'm asking this as a literal question, not as a passive aggressive way to disagree. I seek understanding.)

             

              With the disclaimer that I'm not a doctor and don't claim any of this to be "science" ...

               

              My understanding is that connective tissue works best when the tissue fibers are more or less "aligned", as they typically are found in healthy tissue.  Post-injury healing often lays down fibers in a mish-mash (my apologies for the medical jargon).  Graston is one of several techniques that seek to break up mis-aligned or randomly laid-down fibers, promoting healing in a more fiber-aligned orientation.

              “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

                With the disclaimer that I'm not a doctor and don't claim any of this to be "science" ...

                 

                My understanding is that connective tissue works best when the tissue fibers are more or less "aligned", as they typically are found in healthy tissue.  Post-injury healing often lays down fibers in a mish-mash (my apologies for the medical jargon).  Graston is one of several techniques that seek to break up mis-aligned or randomly laid-down fibers, promoting healing in a more fiber-aligned orientation.

                 

                Yeah, that's what I think he said. He showed me a picture that depicted the fascia all lined up and one with the fibers looking like a ball of yarn after a kitten got at it. The "Internet says" it speeds up recovery. They bruised me badly last tine too with just their hands and they said that was good because it meant they encouraged blood flow to the area which generally doesn't get much blood flow. I'm hoping it works.

                Suffering Benefiting from mature onset exercise addiction and low aerobic endorphin release threshold. Hoping there is no cure.

                  I had a nagging groin injury.  I read a lot about it, and there is very little scientific/medical evidence to support it.  I also didn't see a reason why it would be harmful.   I let my curiosity as well as desire to get better override my rationale side and had weekly treatments for 5 weeks.  

                   

                  I did bruise.  I did get a lot better.  I also rested a lot and decreased my mileage.  

                   

                  Here is my opinion:  

                  1.  The technique may work, and it is common enough to suggest there are no harmful effects (other than the pocket book).  

                  2.  The picture your doctor showed you were likely from a paper published in the 1990's.  If I remember, the researchers damaged the achilles tendon in rats and then applied a graston type technique and then looked at the appearance of the tissue a week later.   Most published studies in humans are case reports and series.  In scientific lingo, that is level II-3 evidence.  

                  3.  Bruising is in the skin, and doesn't necessarily mean blood flow increased to the muscles beneath.  

                   

                   

                  IMHO, go ahead and do what you need to get better.  Once there, it may be better to do preventive exercises to strengthen the IT and other muscle groups in the legs and core.  

                   

                  FWIW:   http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/?s=graston  

                                http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-241-285--13993-0,00.html

                  2012 Goals:

                  Stay healthy, stay running

                  Lose those extra pounds 

                    I think the foam roller would do just as good.  I am not  planning on decreasing my mileage either.  I signed up for a race on the 20th.  While the physiotherapist works away on the IT, the chiropractor is doing a number on the piriformis, which is actually helping it too.  I think I might do a couple more of those treatments then I'm going to work on strengthening my glutes and my core. I just need to be diligent! 

                     

                    Is there anyone out there over 50 that runs with no pain?

                    Suffering Benefiting from mature onset exercise addiction and low aerobic endorphin release threshold. Hoping there is no cure.

                      I had a few graston therapy sessions back in March when my knee was acting up before a HM.  The PT did the graston right on my knee and also hit the IT band area.  It was painful and it seemed to help.  There was definitely much less pain during my runs after the therapy sessions and I PR'd the HM.

                        I had a few graston therapy sessions back in March when my knee was acting up before a HM.  The PT did the graston right on my knee and also hit the IT band area.  It was painful and it seemed to help.  There was definitely much less pain during my runs after the therapy sessions and I PR'd the HM.

                         

                         

                        Right on!  I'm going with this answer!  Big grin

                        Suffering Benefiting from mature onset exercise addiction and low aerobic endorphin release threshold. Hoping there is no cure.

                        J.D.


                          I've had graston done many times on several different places. Calves, achilles, feet, shins, hip flexor, quad. I've found it to be very helpful. Sometimes I bruise, sometimes I don't. I often feel relief and an improved range of motion immediately. You won't get the same results by just foam rolling the area. Graston breaks up tiny muscle adhesions.

                            I have a question.

                             

                            If you have had it "many times", why do you consider it effective?

                             

                            (I promise I'm asking this as a literal question, not as a passive aggressive way to disagree. I seek understanding.)

                             

                             

                            Gastron is a form of therapy, and not a drug,  similar to the function of ART.  

                             

                            I had ART performed on my calves many times and each time it led to more healing and more breakup of scar tissue.  Whether someone goes to a chiropractor or a traditional physical therapist, treatment isn't complete after just one or two sessions. 

                            xor


                              I know it isn't a drug.

                               

                              I still have the same question.

                               

                              Panuccio


                                Thanks ! Graston Technique is a therapeutic approach used by many physiotherapists in order to therapeutically treat problems related to skeletal, muscle, and soft tissue injuries. It is also used by chiropractors and physical therapists to manage cumulative trauma and chronic disorders.you get stronger to reduce your risk of the problem happening again. 

                                 

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