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how do you run a mile? (Read 1013 times)

    I can say from very recent experience that if you are coming from years of only racing 5k and up, mile race pace feels insanely fast right from the first 200, and it never lets up.

    Runners run.

      1st quarter -- relax and try not to think about the pace

      2nd quarter -- rhythm, keep it quick, don't let it drop

      3rd quarter -- don't be afraid the end is closer than you think hang. in. there.

      4th quarter -- kick even though you think you can't

        1st quarter -- relax and try not to think about the pace

        2nd quarter -- rhythm, keep it quick, don't let it drop

        3rd quarter -- don't be afraid the end is closer than you think hang. in. there.

        4th quarter -- kick even though you think you can't

         

        This is an excellent strategy.  I also like the strategy of finding a kid that runs even splits at around your pace, and then try to outkick him in the last 200.

         

        Northernman, Maybe you should ask around and see if anyone is willing to pace you through the 6:10 mile.  I have the opposite problem.  The longer the distance, the slower I am according to the charts.


        A Dance with Monkeys

          I can say from very recent experience that if you are coming from years of only racing 5k and up, mile race pace feels insanely fast right from the first 200, and it never lets up.

           

          Worth the read, now linked above.


          A Dance with Monkeys

            And Jeff once wrote about the mile:

             

            "The Mile: I'd go out as easy as possible the first quarter, holding back. The second quarter is getting into position: locating your competitors and getting in position on their shoulder or in a place where you can run smooth, just behind. The third quarter is the race. RACE. The fourth quarter cannot be put into words."

              I am absolutely head over heels in love with the mile.  Fortunately, I get to race it usually a couple of times a year.  I think naturally, I am a much better miler than marathon runner, although I love them both.  (Well, love/hate the marathon).

               

              Race the blessed thing almost like it is a 1200, except sans kick at the end of lap 3 of course.  This approach has served me the best, and gets me into that almost-an-800 mentality -- it should feel a little scary fast the first couple of laps.  This will bring you into the final turn of the 3rd lap wondering if you really can possibly go another 600 meters.  But you can.  This approach may not serve true "kickers" well, but for guys like me with decent speed, but not lightning speed, it serves to put a little junk in the legs of the nearby kickers.

              - Joe

              all running goals are under review by the executive committee.

                There is a difference between racing and time trialling. If you're racing it depends on who you're racing against and how fast you think they are relative to you. If you're time trialling then you want to run pretty much even pace. It helps if you can tuck in behind someone - but that depends on having someone there at the right pace. For records attempts pace makers are often provided - you might be able to find some friends to do some pace making for you.

                 

                If you don't really know what you're capable of then it takes a few experiments to find the correct pace. If you're used to running marathons then mile pace feels crazy-fast initially - especially if you have no history of doing track at school or college.

                Crazy Justin


                  Mike- Congrats on breaking 5:00.  I really enjoyed that report, especially your description of the finish.

                  I do agree that some people are naturally suited for shorter distances and I am one of them.  I've never really trained properly for a marathon but I believe that I have a better chance of a sub-5 Mile than a sub-3 marathon. Which is tougher for an adult runner?  I'd be curious about the consensus but I'll bet most people would say that esp for 30+ year olds, the sub-3 is less difficult.

                  I recently blogged about the Mile.  Check it out:

                  http://crazyj208.blogspot.com/2012/12/rave-middle-distance-and-mile.html

                  PR- How much difference do you think it is between a time trial and a "well paced" race effort?  I say 4-6 seconds.  I wish there were more track meets here in Birmingham but to get good competition, I'd probably have to go to Atlanta.

                  Mile: 5:18,   5K: 19:13,  10K: 39:44,  Half: 1:28:12,  Full: 3:21:56

                   

                  http://jzehnder208.googlepages.com

                  www.crazyj208.blogspot.com

                     

                    I do agree that some people are naturally suited for shorter distances and I am one of them.  I've never really trained properly for a marathon but I believe that I have a better chance of a sub-5 Mile than a sub-3 marathon. Which is tougher for an adult runner?  I'd be curious about the consensus but I'll bet most people would say that esp for 30+ year olds, the sub-3 is less difficult.

                     

                    Totally depends on the runner. For me, sub 5 mile was less difficult (clearly - because I haven't gone sub-3 yet). Though this may be just because you can attempt the mile so many more times, so if something goes wrong, you can quickly try again. I ran the mile, missed sub 5, tried again a month later and got it, having figured out some of my errors the first time round. I ran a marathon in Oct, missed sub 3, and it's going to be a long ass time before I try that again.

                     

                    Also, competition is a huge factor in getting the best out of your mile - or any race I guess.

                    Come all you no-hopers, you jokers and rogues
                    We're on the road to nowhere, let's find out where it goes
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