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Weight Training Question (Read 1203 times)


Member Since 2008

    I have never weight training with my legs as a runner and am wanting to start.  I have very strong legs and can squat 300 pounds rather easily.  How much should I be lifting?  Light weights and alot of repetitions or Heavy weights with not so many repetitions.  Then, How often per week.

     

    A little further into:  Have been training for a marathon, and have taken the past two weeks off just to rest.  Any help would be greatly appreciated.

      Low reps + high weight + long rest = size + strength

       
      High reps + low weight + short rest = endurance

       

      You should look at 2-3 sets of 12-15 reps with 1.5-2 minutes rest between sets on the hip sled and hamstring curl machine.  That's probably all you need, as your legs are plenty strong already.  Doing higher reps at lower weight with short rest between sets will help develop additional endurance and some strength, but is no substitute for the long run.  Hamstrings tend to be weak relative to quads in runners so it is important to work them in isolation.   Once a week should be enough -- the benefit is thought to be similar to running hills.

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        Low reps + high weight + long rest = size + strength

         
        High reps + low weight + short rest = endurance

         

         

        Thasss right. Low reps are 4-5- they're for the muscle builder crowd.

         

        MTA I mean body builders

          Do exercises on feet - more functional. Walking lunges, one leg squats, squats...... I would do  2-3 sets of 15- 20 reps 2 X per week.  Start slowly or you will be very sore which will affect running.

          Those who try, fail! Those who do what it takes to succeed, succeed!!

            Low reps + high weight + long rest = size + strength

             
            High reps + low weight + short rest = endurance

             

            On point #1, this is only true if there is a caloric surplus. No caloric surplus - no size gains and only minimal strength gains. High reps introduce more fatigue and do much less to preserve strength. In fact, you'll lose it. I usually lift 3x/week following Mark Rippetoe's Starting Strength routine. All compound movements, purely strength based. I'm training for Boston and do not want to lose too much of my strength. However, I've cut the frequency and I watch the intensity. I've cut the weight training down to twice a week but only do squats once per week. Hasn't affected my running and I've been able to maintain much of my strength.

             

            Monday: squats 2x5, standing press 3x5, chin-ups, back extensions

            Thurs: Bench 3x5, deadlifts 1x5, pull-ups, weighted dips

             

            I throw some weighted sit-ups in wherever.

             

            good luck

             

            MTA: these are only work sets. I always warm up before. I highly recommend the book.

             


            i sacrificed the gift

               

              Thasss right. Low reps are 4-5- they're for the muscle builder crowd.

               

              MTA I mean body builders

               

               

              Bodybuilder training is for sarcoplasmic hypertrophy primarily, which involves doing many high rep sets until muscle burnout.

               

              Low rep sets are for strength athletes.  However, bodybuilders do need to have a base level of strength in order to cause the amount of stress that they need for growth.

               

               

              But don't think of low rep sets as being for bodybuilding.  They are useful for any strength sport.

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                On point #1, this is only true if there is a caloric surplus. No caloric surplus - no size gains and only minimal strength gains.

                 

                I'll agree that no caloric surplus equals no size gains but disagree that you'll end up with minimal strength gains. Most powerlifters and olympic weightlifters work to stay within a weight class and the good ones are definitely making strength gains year after year while staying in the same weight class (no caloric surplus).

                 

                Coming from a powerlifting background I'm having trouble seeing how lifting is that useful for my running. It seems to me that injury prevention may be the #1 value. The main problem I see is that squatting and running compete for recovery. Because of that I'm not even trying to maintain squat strength (only putting a little more effort into deadlift maintenance, which doesn't compete with running so much).

                  I do weights only once per week.  Mostly bodyweight such as lunges, squats, step ups, hamstring bridge, and single leg squats.  2-3 sets of 15-20reps.  I usually do this on Tuesday after my Monday rest day. 

                   

                  I use my hills runs and sprints for an additional workout for my legs.  I find this to be very successful training as it allows me to build leg strength while doing the specific activity (running).  My hills vary between short and long.  One week I will do a rolling 5-6 mile course that includes at least 4 hills in 800m length.  The next week i might do 10-12 short hill sprints of 50-100m in length.  I find this really improved my leg strength and marathon performance.

                   

                  Jill

                  http://runwithjill.com

                  Be Well, Run Well http:www.runwithjill.com

                    I tried the heavy compound route, al la starting strength.

                     

                    If your primary goal is running I discovered this is a huge mistake. Your joints will rebel.

                     

                    Now I'm doing bodyweight stuff and my body is very happy about itSmile

                     

                    Stick to basic compounds but 12-15 reps feels about right. Lunges, push ups, pulls ups and core work get it done.

                    PR's: 5k 19:34 2008 10k 41:05 2008 Half 1:34:34 2007 Marathon 3:29:49 2009 Up next, Spring Marathon NJ?