Boston, Boston, Boston (Read 1246 times)

    I've been toying with the idea of trying to qualify for Boston this year (thanks to muse_runner Wink), and I decided to go for it! Hell, I'll need the stress relief from studying for the Bar anyhow! I'd like a solid, concrete training program -- I need to know how far, how fast, and how often I should run to get down to 3:40 (my marathon PR is 4:02:10, so it's going to require a lot of work). Ideas for books, websites, etc? I don't mind spending the $ if there is a great book. Like I said, I'm really looking for a day by day, week by week schedule. Thanks! Smile
    2009: BQ?
      muse_runner showed me this one: http://www.runningtimes.com/rt/articles/?id=4835&page=6&c=83#program looks interesting!
      2009: BQ?
        how exciting! I was just thinking about Boston on my run today. I can feel it...this is my year too! I'm hoping to BQ at the San Diego Rock n Roll! Good luck to you! I'm using Hal Higdons marathon training program. Last year was my my first marathon(the RnR) and I followed his intermediate I schedule ... I need to knock 3 minutes off last years time to BQ so I'm working on the Intermediate II plan. If it's gets to be too much, I can always fall back to the Int.
        Jennifer mm#1231
          I know a LOT of people who swear by Pete Pfitinzger's Advanced Marathoning training plans. I've read dozens of reports of people crediting Pfitzinger's plans with BQ and/or PR performances. I used the plan in his book to notch a 3:29 in my first marathon, and I'm using it again to go for a BQ this June.
          How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.
            What's your running history? I see your log goes back a year, were you running before that? There's no secret formula for taking 20 minutes off your marathon PR. It's just going to take more mileage and consistency. The program you quote from Running Times is good--I actually have communicated with Kevin Beck over the years and he knows what he's talking about. But it would be really tough for most people to follow a schedule like that since it sort of ignores the calendar. And I think it's a bit advanced. Pfitzinger is very good. Jack Daniels is also very good. They also both scale pretty well for a range of abilities and experience levels. The bottom line is the program doesn't really matter. You will find more similarities than differences among the most popular training manuals. The formula is pretty simple. You need to run a lot. Good luck! But be careful. Boston can be addictive.

            Runners run.


            A Dance with Monkeys

              Cutting 22 minutes off a marathon PR is a bit of work. Looking at your log, I see that you ran a HM last Fall at an 8:21 pace. To run a marathon in 3:40, you need to hold an 8:23 pace for the entire 26.2 miles. As you know, there is a huge difference between 13.1 and 26.2. Looking further at your log, I see that you almost never run any speedwork or tempo down in that pace range or faster. You will need to add that in with your training, going faster than your marathon goal pace probably once per week. There are plenty of guides out there, such as some of those listed above, and you should probably check out the McMillan calculator to see what pace you should be running your different training components to see if 3:40 is realistic right now or to see if you will need more time working for it. All that said, I dropped 27 minutes off my PR in 5 months, so you can do it. It will just require work and time.
                I had good success with Pfitzinger's 55 mpw program. I am not using ti this go around because of the lack of a base going in to training but may go back to it within my next 2 marathons. Looks like you have a good enough base to use it if you decide to.
                http://distance-runner.blogspot.com
                  Looking further at your log, I see that you almost never run any speedwork or tempo down in that pace range or faster.
                  Trent, once a week I do the following speed workout: 10 min warm up (9:30) 3 min at 8:20 (tempo) 3 min 7:30 (5K) 3 min at 8:20 (tempo) 3 min 7:30 (5K) 3 min at 8:20 (tempo) 3 min 7:30 (5K) 3 min at 8:20 (tempo) 3 min 7:30 (5K) 10 min cool down (9:30) Should I do more? do it more often? Thanks, everyone, for your help and advice Smile Even if I don't BQ, I know I'll get faster. I like the runningtimes.com schedule and I'm going to check out Pfitzinger on amazon. Trish Big grin
                  2009: BQ?


                  A Dance with Monkeys

                    Got it, I did not see that. Do these get easier after a few weeks? If so, you may want to increase the intensity. What does your HR do during these?
                      Hey trishie (love that name, it's my sister's name) I saw that workout and it's a fine one. You could keep doing that and/or alternate it with some longer tempo-only intervals etc. The main thing is that where you're at right now the details don't matter very much. You need a blunt insrument: lots of miles. You need to build the biggest, baddest aerobic base you can for a while. It will be interesting to see what you do for your next 5K since it looks like you haven't run one in a long time (last June?) But your current times for 5K, 10K don't predict a 3:40 and, as Trent noted, you have 20 minutes to chop from your Marathon. That's not to say you can't do it--especially since you seem to be still pretty new to running and have tons of upside--it just means you need to start with the very basics; aerobic endurance. You should keep doing some faster running each week, but for now the exact workouts are not super important. Just my .02

                      Runners run.

                        Thanks, guys. I know I need to get in a lot of miles ... question: what should my mileage be now through when I actually start "training"? I'm doing about 30ish miles a week, and normally do about 40 during marathon training.
                        2009: BQ?
                          How much should you be running now? Well now that's the million dollar question, isn't it? I dunno, you figure it out. Smile Somewhere between more than you are now and as much as you can handle without breaking. How's that for vague?

                          Runners run.

                            Somewhere between more than you are now and as much as you can handle without breaking. How's that for vague?
                            I like the way you think, Mike. Also, while you're building, don't worry about intensity so much. Better to sacrifice intensity to mileage--at least this far out. Lowering the intensity a bit will help you stay injury free. Keep in touch with speed by running strides at the end of your runs or doing form drills. You can sharpen the blunt instrument when you get closer to race time. Go for it.


                            A Dance with Monkeys

                              as much as you can handle without breaking
                              Jeff, what do you think. Sounds kinda like "load to failure". Hmmm. That worked out well, eh? Roll eyes Wink
                                Jeff, what do you think. Sounds kinda like "load to failure". Hmmm. That worked out well, eh? Roll eyes Wink
                                There are limits to every type of obsession. He's trying to hit rock-bottom in running. The "load to failure" guy, for those out of the loop, is here: http://www.chuckengle.com