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Altitude runs (Read 604 times)


Swadvad

    I'm going to Colorado Springs on vacation next week. Where I live the elevation is about 350 ft. I know I won't be able to run the same in Colorado as I do here. Should I shorten my runs, slow down, alternate run/walk, or some combination of these? The last thing I want to do on vacation is DIE! or visit the hospital, but I do want to try to run every day. I've been painting the outside of my house for the past month in between work, kid's baseball, swim meets, etc. and I haven't gotten to run much. Anyone have any suggestions on how to handle the altitude?
      I'm going to Colorado Springs on vacation next week. Where I live the elevation is about 350 ft. I know I won't be able to run the same in Colorado as I do here. Should I shorten my runs, slow down, alternate run/walk, or some combination of these? The last thing I want to do on vacation is DIE! or visit the hospital, but I do want to try to run every day. I've been painting the outside of my house for the past month in between work, kid's baseball, swim meets, etc. and I haven't gotten to run much. Anyone have any suggestions on how to handle the altitude?
      My wife and I moved to Colorado Springs from Iowa last November. The first week or two of running was ok, but we did slow down and drop our mileage a bit; from 5 mile to 3. We found that after that second week we really started to feel the effects of the altitude. It reached a point where I was lucky to finish a 2 mile run without crawling to the front door. In hindsight, if I had slowed down even more I might have been better off. With all of that mumble jumble said, I would drop a couple of miles off your run, slow down and if you feel the need, do short walk breaks (the scenery on the trails are beautiful out here, so the walks will be nice). Good luck.
      "It is very hard in the beginning to understand that the whole idea is not to beat the other runner. Eventually you learn that the competition is against the little voice inside you that wants to quit." George Sheehan
        Drink a lot of water!
        Runners around the state are getting better today ...are you one of them? TRAIN HARD
        db7


          Rest the first day or two you are here. You will probably be tired from traveling and usually dehydrated. Plan to run slower and shorter than you are used to. Most of all, dont forget to enjoy the views and the cool mornings! Have a great time. DB

          Tougher than most, dumber than the rest. "You can not count the miles until you feel them" TVZ

            We did a ski trip this past January to Breckenridge (elevation 9000ft) and did morning runs every day. We were really slow, but I found it helped my energy levels the rest of the day. I second what Cougar89 said and I'll emphasize it more DRINK LOTS OF WATER!
              I would also remember sun-block - you are closer to the sun and will burn more easily. I find I am most out of breathe the first couple days at altitude, and then things start to get easier. I would say do what you feel like - if feel are way more out of breathe than normal try a run/walk or slowing down. If your legs get tired quickly, modify your run to a shorter route. I know its not specific, but everyone is different. HoD - Wow - running before skiing - I am super impressed! I havent done that since I was forced to. (And it was about minus 10 out at 5 AM! I think that was one of the colder Jan's in NH!)
              downshiftbarbie


                Try to hit up Garden of the Gods. That's one of my favorite places in CoSpgs for a run. Check out www.pprrun.org for more info, the whole city is an amazing place to run.
                Some runners drag a tire. I drag a Great Pyrenees.


                Swadvad

                  Try to hit up Garden of the Gods. That's one of my favorite places in CoSpgs for a run.
                  Garden of the Gods is great! I haven't run there, but I've been there before. Thanks for the suggestion. I'll try that first.