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Approaching a Cyclist - Which Side of the Road? (Read 133 times)

     

    I adopted a greyhound last year and perhaps predictably when she sees runners she thinks she's racing again and starts chasing them (if she sees them ahead) or galloping to stay ahead (if they're coming from behind).  It's very cute.  Edited to add: we're trying to train some of this out of her. For example, teaching her to heel so when she sees things that excite her - rabbits, cats, and runners - she won't give chase. Didn't want to imply that I thought it was cute that she wants to chase runners.

     

    Dogs love to chase.  And a lot of them like to "race" too.  I will never forget the time that my husky, Kremlin, and the neighborhood pitbull mix and owner decided to have a dog race on opposite sidewalks one evening. That guy was all jaws, breathing like a locomotive but a complete dynamo of muscle.  Kremlin was like Fabio running with his long fur flowing in the wind, four paw drive engaged.  Funniest thing ever!  I think we would have beat him by a whisker but pitbull and owner turned down a side street.

    "Shut up Legs!" Jens Voigt

    Fredford66


    Running Musician

       

      I adopted a greyhound last year and perhaps predictably when she sees runners she thinks she's racing again and starts chasing them (if she sees them ahead) or galloping to stay ahead (if they're coming from behind).  It's very cute.  Edited to add: we're trying to train some of this out of her. For example, teaching her to heel so when she sees things that excite her - rabbits, cats, and runners - she won't give chase. Didn't want to imply that I thought it was cute that she wants to chase runners.

       

      Clarification much appreciated.

      5k 23:48.45 (3/22); 4M 31:26 (2/22); 5M 39:24 (11/21); 10k 50:32 (10/21); Half 1:50:46 (4/22)

      Upcoming race(s): Grete's Great Gallop 10k, 8/27
      Julia1971


         

        Clarification much appreciated.

         

        Yes, the cute part is that she doesn't realize she's retired. She also does things like sleep on the cold, hard floor instead of her dog bed. We're guessing because it reminds her of the kennel. They are funny dogs in so many ways from growing up on the track. (Greyhound adoptees also have to swear upon threat of having the dog taken away they will never let the dog off-leash in public, so, unless that was also unclear.)

        Julia1971


           

          Dogs love to chase.  And a lot of them like to "race" too.  I will never forget the time that my husky, Kremlin, and the neighborhood pitbull mix and owner decided to have a dog race on opposite sidewalks one evening. That guy was all jaws, breathing like a locomotive but a complete dynamo of muscle.  Kremlin was like Fabio running with his long fur flowing in the wind, four paw drive engaged.  Funniest thing ever!  I think we would have beat him by a whisker but pitbull and owner turned down a side street.

           

          We have a few local races that allow dogs.  Michael Wardian's viszlas are pretty popular around here, too.  But, I think he runs with them on trails mostly. I sometimes wish I had a doggie companion for some of my runs, but mine seems to max out at one mile.

          rlopez


             

            Same. Ever since I got bitten by one while passing too close on the sidewalk. Of course, according to the owner, “he never does that.” Wrong, he just did.

             

            I realized after dropping off that comment that I probably made it sound like I give dogs a wide berth because unpredictable, might bite, etc. THIS IS ALL TOTALLY FAIR FOR SURE.

             

            In my case, I was actually viewing this from the perspective of my dog. Ever since we adopted a previously abused pit bull, I've become enlightened from "the dog's view". People running up on her, especially from behind, scare the fuck out of her. It's sad and kind of not ok, and also nobody's "fault". But it's still a thing and I don't want to do it to other dogs. I used to do it all the time because of etiquette and whatnot and my 'right to be there' and all that. For me, I'd rather be a little wrong for a sec (provided the road is clear) and not make a thing. And if the road isn't clear, I now just wait it out.

             

            (this is all me, not trying to tell anyone else how to do stuff)

            darkwave


            Mother of Cats

              I usually make a point of calling out my approach when approaching a dog+owner.  And I do try to give space if I can - sometimes I can't - especially when it's a dog on a retractable leash attached to an owner who is focused on their cellphone.

               

              We had an entertaining discussion on the local NextDoor a few years back when a dog owner posted that it was common courtesy for all runners to cross the street and use the opposite sidewalk when a dog was present.  This instruction was not well received by most.

              Everyone's gotta running blog; I'm the only one with a POOL-RUNNING blog.

               

              And...if you want a running Instagram where all the pictures are of cats, I've got you covered.

              DavePNW


                 

                I realized after dropping off that comment that I probably made it sound like I give dogs a wide berth because unpredictable, might bite, etc. THIS IS ALL TOTALLY FAIR FOR SURE.

                 

                In my case, I was actually viewing this from the perspective of my dog. Ever since we adopted a previously abused pit bull, I've become enlightened from "the dog's view". People running up on her, especially from behind, scare the fuck out of her. It's sad and kind of not ok, and also nobody's "fault". But it's still a thing and I don't want to do it to other dogs. I used to do it all the time because of etiquette and whatnot and my 'right to be there' and all that. For me, I'd rather be a little wrong for a sec (provided the road is clear) and not make a thing. And if the road isn't clear, I now just wait it out.

                 

                (this is all me, not trying to tell anyone else how to do stuff)

                 

                Yeah I didn’t mean to blame the dog or even the owner. More just a lesson learned. I ran past, clearly a little too closely; presumably the dog felt threatened. The owner was holding the leash taut, but it only took a quick lunge to get me. Broke the skin through my shirt & shorts. So yeah I just play it safe now.

                Dave

                LedLincoln


                not bad for mile 25

                  I realized after dropping off that comment that I probably made it sound like I give dogs a wide berth because unpredictable, might bite, etc. THIS IS ALL TOTALLY FAIR FOR SURE.

                   

                  In my case, I was actually viewing this from the perspective of my dog. Ever since we adopted a previously abused pit bull, I've become enlightened from "the dog's view". People running up on her, especially from behind, scare the fuck out of her. It's sad and kind of not ok, and also nobody's "fault". But it's still a thing and I don't want to do it to other dogs. I used to do it all the time because of etiquette and whatnot and my 'right to be there' and all that. For me, I'd rather be a little wrong for a sec (provided the road is clear) and not make a thing. And if the road isn't clear, I now just wait it out.

                   

                  (this is all me, not trying to tell anyone else how to do stuff)

                   

                  I think we runners sometimes forget that it's okay to slow down or stop in order to avoid a situation.  So what if our net pace takes a bit of a hit?

                  Half Crazy K 2.0


                    There is a big differencec in interactions with the morning outdoors crowd and the afternoon outdoors crowd in my area. In general, the morning runners, walkers, dog walkers, etc, are almost always solo and everyone tends to try to give plenty of space to the others (very common that both jump off the sidedwalk into the parking or bike lane to give the other space, then one gets back on the sidewalk). The afternoon tends to see more pairs or more of people out who cannot be bothered with anyone around them. There is no sidewalk sharing, aside from the morning folks who are also walking the dog in the afternoon.

                    rlopez


                      I usually make a point of calling out my approach when approaching a dog+owner.  And I do try to give space if I can - sometimes I can't - especially when it's a dog on a retractable leash attached to an owner who is focused on their cellphone.

                       

                      We had an entertaining discussion on the local NextDoor a few years back when a dog owner posted that it was common courtesy for all runners to cross the street and use the opposite sidewalk when a dog was present.  This instruction was not well received by most.

                       

                      First off, retractable leashes are bullshit and in no way am I defending them. I hate them as a road runner, as a trail runner, and as a dog owner (when I see another dog approaching on a retractable). 

                      Also, it's very good to call out. Thank you.

                       

                      That said, sometimes people call out... like there's something I, the dog owner with the skittish dog, am supposed to be able to do. Usually there's not. So, it definitely beats surprising us, but sometimes people think that means I'll magically disappear or my dog will suddenly become The Best Dog ever, and nah :-). It is the right thing to do, though, and I can at least brace myself for what may happen next.

                       

                      Counter-point to myself... although I typically try to stay out of other people's yards and on the sidewalk (dog only goes into a yard up to the leash's length), it took me way way too long to figure out that in this type of situation, where I need a safe "out", it's totally ok for me to walk up into a yard or up a driveway if that beats an altercation. I am ashamed at my own lack of smarts for taking so long to figure this out.


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                        rlopez


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                          Running Problem


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                            I think we runners sometimes forget that it's okay to slow down or stop in order to avoid a situation.  So what if our net pace takes a bit of a hit?

                             

                            Finally. Some sense. If the world was filled with people who thought "maybe I'm not right about how I think this situation is handled" we would have a lot less upset people.

                             

                            I just run and stop worrying about what other people are doing. Over the weekend I was pacing a runner up a trail. It was pretty narrow but enough room for two people. I was approached by a runner coming downhill. There was a slight "I'm going left, no wait we're both going to that side." moment at which point I froze and decided if I didn't move I could reduce the possibility of an impact. I could be a complete jerk and say "we were actively involved with finishing a race" or even yelled at this person for being so inconsiderate as to run on the course. Instead I let them pass and continued on my day not worried about who they are, where they were going or why they were going so fast. I just wanted to speak of a time I encountered someone on a trail and it wasn't miserable. There is no state law about which direction to run on trails and I'm unfamiliar with who has the right of way for uphill/downhill.

                            Many of us aren't sure what the hell point you are trying to make and no matter how we guess, it always seems to be something else. Which usually means a person is doing it on purpose.

                            VDOT 54.9

                            5k19:35 | Marathon 2:56:07


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