Barefoot/Minimalist Shoe Running Clinic in Grand Rapids, Michigan (Read 1840 times)


Professional Antagonist

    I'll be running another barefoot/minimalist shoe clinic in Grand Rapids, Michigan.  The clinic will meet twice- January 16th and 30th from 12-2.  Topics to be covered include:

     

    • My Six Principles of Successful Barefoot and Minimalist Shoe Running
    • Progression of transition
    • How to develop excellent form
    • Drills
    • Common concerns
    • How to avoid injuries
    • Winter running
    If you have questions or to register, contact Jason at barefootchronicles "at" gmail "dot" com.  If you are interested in bringing a clinic to your area, contact me.  Here's the site for clinic attendees:

    http://barefootrunninguniversity.com/clinics.html

    The site also contains some video of previous clinics.

    Barefoot Running University- Jason's barefoot running site

    CClay


    Better than all of you

      This should be renamed the "Quickest Way to get Injured Clinic".


      • Going against decades of research, studies and common sense
      • How to bond with glass and small rocks properly
      • More things your podiatrist tells you not to

         While I generally regard the current barefoot trend as a matter of the pendulum swinging too far the other way--i.e., shoes going from the cure of all problems to the root of all problems--most barefoot runners I know are also generally the least often injured runners I know.  And I don't know of any decades of research (though I imagine the big shoe companies can produce some) that shows that shoes prevent injuries.

        This should be renamed the "Quickest Way to get Injured Clinic".

         

        Runners run.


        A Dance with Monkeys

          Going against decades of research, studies and common sense

           

          I'd love to see some of the research and studies showing clear evidence that running shoes prevent injuries. There is evidence that the opposite is true. In fact, American runners in fancy shoes have much higher risk of running-related injuries than runners in parts of the world where such shoes do not exist, AND American runners a couple decades ago wearing simpler shoes had a much lower rate of injuries.

           

          How to bond with glass and small rocks properly

           

          In my experience, eyes are a very powerful tool for avoiding glass and small rocks. When running barefoot, runners place their feet fairly carefully and avoid a lot of stuff. Shod runners tend to be far less careful and end up slipping on pebbles and branches and getting hurt in other ways.

           

          More things your podiatrist tells you not to

           

          There is no clear evidence-based standard in podiatry w.r.t. being barefoot.

            • Going against decades of research, studies and common sense

             

            All due respect, Clay, I personally feel "decades of research" was actually more like "decades or (market) research".  The fact is; this "recent" trend was rather against thousands of years, not just a few decades, of evolution.  Even in th 1980s, runners were wearing shoes like this:

             

            Toshihiko Seko of Japan wore this exct shoe to win Boston marathon, over that hilly course, in 2:09 something in 1981 (as well as finishing second to Bill Rodgers in 1979 in this very shoe) and ran 2:08: 30 something PR for the marathon.

             

            As far as I'm concerned, over-cushion and over-stability led to Plantar Fasciitis; over-stability led to ITBS; and these are what Arthur Lydiard used to call "American shoe diseases".  We don't hear that in Japan as much (though with the introduction of more Western running shoes, we had started getting some) and we never heard of those things, paricularly ITBS, in the 70s or even 80s (granted, a lot more people are running today).

             

            But what you said, and the way you said it, lead me to believe that you pick up magazines like "Men's Health" at the airport stand more than books like "Explosive Running" by Michael Yessis, for example.  I strongly recommend this book (though I don't agree with some of his exercises).

             

            We never ever had those overly developed footwear, by-products of "decades of research".  Advancement of materials in particular led us to have less problems like blisters, etc.  But A LOT of running-related injuries today are due to improper running shoes and lack of proper running technique due in large part to inproper footwear.

             

            I, for one, had more than 5-years of Achilles problems and my "common sense" told me to go minimalist.  I don't go to the extreme of barefoot running or one of those Vi...something (with separate toes) type of footwear; but I go almost 2-hours in shoes like ASICS Piranha and I have a lot LESS problems than when I was running in some of those high-tech shoes.

             

            Years ago, people looked at heart diseases as an unfortunate inevitable for getting old.  A few of us resisted accepting it and figure, since heart is a muscle just like any other muscles in our body, we should strengthen our heart instead of doing nothing.  This led to the world-wide jogging movement.  You get out and run, or do aerobic exercises, to strengthen your heart.  We now know, or should know, that if we have a weak spot, it's better off strengthening it instead of pampering it and doing nothing...excpet for feet/shoes.  The trend of last couple of "decades" has been: "support it, stabilize it, cushion it..."  The reason why we can't even run barefoot is because we weakened our feet so much.  Like I said, I don't go the extreme like some real minimalist people or barefoot runners--I prefer SOME cushion.  But I can't even run in most of today's "conventional" shoes any more--they feel too bulky; too stiff; too far off the ground....

             

            Hate to say but I'd say "Quickest Way to Get-Injured" would be running in ski boots.  Next quickest way would be running in heavy rigid ski-boot-like high tech running shoes. 

              PS: Hmmmm...  After correcting the misspell, the image disappeared and I dont' seem to be able to get it back up again...  Here I'll try it again:

               

              Okay, I give up.  Can't do it!  Here's the site:

              http://wiki.excite.co.jp/page/%E3%82%B9%E3%83%BC%E3%83%91%E3%83%BC%E3%83%9E%E3%83%A9%E3%83%83%E3%83%97.html

               

              Huh?  Now it's up again...???

              CClay


              Better than all of you

                Stephen Pribut, who is on the board of advisors for Runner’sWorld magazine and a former president of the American Academy of PodiatricSports Medicine, suggests that only runners with a certain arch shapeshould try barefoot running. “Some people’s feet are just built for needingguidance” from shoes, like people with low arches.  “you’re not going toun-pronate your foot by exercising any muscle in your foot.” Overpronation, orexcessive rolling inward of the foot, happens because of bone structure, hesays. In other words, some biomechanical problems will not be corrected bystrengthening the feet.


                "Nobody should take the message that being barefoot isbetter than wearing any type of shoe whatsoever," - Bruce Williams,DPM, past president of the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine and a spokesman for the American Podiatric Medical Association.



                But what would presidents of the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine know?  With regards to "eyes are a very powerful tool for avoiding glass and small rocks" - I run 30-40% on gravel trails and another 15-20% during the dark.  Trying to avoid little rocks, twigs and glass in that is impossible.


                  If there was ever anybody that would "need" all the support, it would be me.  I have hypermobile joints.   My feet arn't flat per say but they are overly flexible.  When I started I overpronated like crazy.  I was fitted for brooks beasts.   The sales rep even wanted me in orthotics.   I got Plantar Fasciitis while wearing the beasts  I was also probably on the verge of getting ITBS.  So I knew that more support was not the answer because I was already wearing the most supportive shoes there was.    At least in the beginning it was a bit harder on my feet, but MUCH MUCH easier on my hips and knees.

                   

                  I would agree that some people need more support.  HOWEVER, the problem is that supportive shoes are very uncomfortable with out a lot of padding.  When you add so much cushioning you are counter acting the effect of the support.  These supportive shoes force your feet to stay in a "neutral" position but they transfer all the instability to your other joints.  If you really need more support what better support is there than the hard flat ground?

                   

                  Your feet are some of the most nerve rich areas in your whole body.   Those nerves are not their just to feel the inside of your shoes.  When you go from running in heavy shoes to barefoot what ever you loose in support you gain back 5 fold in feedback.  Particularly people with form or biomechanical issues need this improved feedback.   Shoes don't protect you from impact, they just shield you from the feelings of impact.  Once you can actually feel how you are running you can learn to run in a way that greatly reduces impact on your body.

                    Stephen Pribut, who is on the board of advisors for Runner’sWorld magazine and a former president of the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine, suggests that only runners with a certain arch shape should try barefoot running. “Some people’s feet are just built for needing guidance” from shoes, like people with low arches.  “you’re not going to un-pronate your foot by exercising any muscle in your foot.” Overpronation, or excessive rolling inward of the foot, happens because of bone structure, he says. In other words, some biomechanical problems will not be corrected by strengthening the feet.

                     

                    Once again, all due respect, I would in fact go the opposite to say that "only runners with a certain arch shape (or certain issues) should wear those overly developed shoes."  Pronation IS a natural movement of the legs.  Yes, there are cases of excess.  Over-pronation occurs in, in my opinion, 3 conditions: 1) structural issue (knock-knees, etc.), 2) muscular issue (weak foot muscles) and 3) inproper shoes.  To say "overpronation happens because of bone structure" is not a good statement for himself--so how many cases of bad bone structure us millions of people have?  80%?  It's like saying human is NOT meant to run.  I'd beg to differ.  Since the days we crawled out of the cave, we've been running.  I very much doubt those cavemen were getting some foot issues because they were running barefoot (granted, those with weak feet would have most likely been eaten by a sabel tiger...).

                     

                    My dad passed away 2 years ago.  He was a mess for 15 years since he had a stroke.  When he had a stroke, doctors told my mom that he wouldn't live.  2 years later, he was back home, rehabilitating.  My mom, with NO medical or nursing background, took care of him.  She literatlly defied doctors.  I remember when I went back to Japan to visit them, he was like a 10-year-old.  Doctors told her that he would stay that way and would never speak.  He had come to the US twice since and, toward the end of his years, he was actually talking to me over the phone.  3 years ago right before Christmas, he complained a stomach ache.  They rushed him to the hospital.  My mom knew there was something wrong.  Doctors kept telling her it's spleen and tried everything to fix his spleen (whatever it might be...).  Mom knew that he was in pain but doctors only saw the graph and said his HR and blood pressure were fine.  What happened was that he developed a blood clot and that stopped blood circulation to his intestines.  By the time doctors thought something was wrong, tissues of his intestines were dead.  In the end, they had to operate on him to remove 90% of his intestine that eventually killed him 10 months later.  My mom lived and took care of him for 15 years.  She knew much better about his condition that doctors and nurses.  I couldn't believe she didn't sue the hospital but that's another matter...  At any rate, she doesn't have any faith in medical professions at all.

                     

                    I'd be curious if those podiatrists actually run and run a great distances over several decades...  I'm sure some do.  You've also got to remember, as Amby Burfoot himself pointed out in the recent article he wrote about minimalist shoes; you've got to see the motivation of those people.  They won't tell their "patients" to go run barefoot and ALL their problems are going to disappear.  Of course they'll tell you to come see them and buy $200 pair of orthtics.  Besides, I'm sorry if I sound like I'm mocking you--seriously, don't mean to--but your last post really sounds like some small article in the bottom 1/3 of the page in "Men's Health" magazine; so-and-so with credential said this and that....  I mean, if you run in something like Brooks Beast or something like that and feel perfect and have less injury and run freely, all the power to you.  But...well, I guess here's a fundamental question; have you tried minimalist shoes before?  I mean, really tried; not like just a day or two but gradually easing into it and see how they feel?  I did that--I experienced both and I swear by minimalist shoes.  I would tend to go by what had worked with me; not what some authority with pieces of paper in frames all over the wall might say.


                    A Dance with Monkeys

                      It is also the case that after 20, 30, 40+ years of being shod, our feet depend on shoes.  Take off the shoes and it will take a while for the intrinsic strengths and natural motions to return.  A person with a flat foot, for example, won't have a normal arch the moment he takes off his shoes.  This is why most barefoot and minimalist experts recommend slow acclimation and foot training.  You can't undo 30 years of oversupport overnight.
                        This should be renamed the "Quickest Way to get Injured Clinic".


                        • Going against decades of research, studies and common sense
                        • How to bond with glass and small rocks properly
                        • More things your podiatrist tells you not to

                        Name one peer reviewed article that states that shoes are good for you. Guaranty you can't. However, I can name articles that state the opposite:
                        Michael Warburton (Dec 2001). "Barefoot Running". Sportscience 5 (3)).
                        Robbins, S; Waked, E (1997Wink. "Hazard of deceptive advertising of athletic footwear". British Journal of Sports Medicine 1 (4): 299–303
                        P W Kong, N G Candelaria, and D R Smith, Running in new and worn shoes: a comparison of three types of cushioning footwear, Br J Sports Med 2009;43:745-749
                        I am sure I could find more if I cared enough.
                        There are plenty of way to prevent cutting ones feet. The key is not using a show that has cushioning.

                         


                        Prince of Fatness

                          It is also the case that after 20, 30, 40+ years of being shod, our feet depend on shoes.  Take off the shoes and it will take a while for the intrinsic strengths and natural motions to return.  A person with a flat foot, for example, won't have a normal arch the moment he takes off his shoes.  This is why most barefoot and minimalist experts recommend slow acclimation and foot training.  You can't undo 30 years of oversupport overnight.

                           

                          I couldn't agree with this more.  My first barefoot run was down to the corner and back, maybe about 400 yards, and I still felt the effects of it.  I eventually worked up to about a mile at a time until the weather got too cold.  I don't plan on going nuts with this, but I feel that a few miles a week will help me with my form, as well as strengthening the feet and ankles.

                          Semi-retired.


                          Imminent Catastrophe


                            "Nobody should take the message that being barefoot isbetter than wearing any type of shoe whatsoever," - Bruce Williams,DPM, past president of the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine and a spokesman for the American Podiatric Medical Association.


                            Podiatrists tend to have that view, because in general that's the way they are trained and educated. You might even say that they have a vested interest in opposing the minimalist/barefoot trend. 

                            Have you ever worn a cast that immobilized an arm or leg? How were those muscles working after 6-8 weeks in a cast? That's what we've been doing to our feet for most of our lives (not an exact comparison, but close enough). If you're fine with cushioned-heel shoes, great. Just keep an open mind that there might be another way. 

                            MTA: Speaking of old-school shoes, I had several pair of these in HS:

                            "Able to function despite imminent catastrophe"

                             "To obtain the air that angels breathe you must come to Tahoe"--Mark Twain

                            "The most common question from potential entrants is 'I do not know if I can do this' to which I usually answer, 'that's the whole point'.--Paul Charteris, Tarawera Ultramarathon RD.

                             

                            √ Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 20/21 July 2013

                            Boston Marathon 21 April 2014

                            Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 19/20 July 2014

                              ut what would presidents of the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine know?  With regards to "eyes are a very powerful tool for avoiding glass and small rocks" - I run 30-40% on gravel trails and another 15-20% during the dark.  Trying to avoid little rocks, twigs and glass in that is impossible.


                               I just run on the rocks. Only when I get tired does it end up hurting.

                               

                              CClay


                              Better than all of you

                                "Podiatrists tend to have that view, because in general that's the way they are trained and educated."



                                Bingo.  No offense to you guys, but podiatrists are the experts.  So I'm going to continue giving their advice more attention than quacks on a message board (of which I am also a member).