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Shin splints (Read 107 times)

Kingfish


    Howdy all,

     

    I'm new and looking for solutions to a problem I've recently developed. At 48 I'm trying to lose 50lb and wanted to start running. Well turns out that was a bit ambitious so I'm walking now and will work up to it after I lose some weight. The problem is after five minutes or so of walking I start getting a shin splint in my left leg. I have low arches and use custom orthotic insoles in my shoes, and even those rubber Dr Scholls heel pads for impact cushioning. I bought a pair of Columbia hikers with good heel & arch support but the problem persists. The only thing I can do is just stop for a minute when/if it gets bad and then start up again. What's frustrating here is this is the kind of thing I thought only happened to runners. How do you folks deal with shin splints?


    Interval Junkie --Nobby

      I've only had shinsplints three times, but it was annoying enough that I looked it up.  At the time this is what I've found:

       

      - Nobody's exactly sure what cause it

      - Prevalent theory is that you're just not up to whatever effort you're putting in

      - Icing seems to be a preferred method of alleviation (R.I.C.E.)

      - Massaging / Rolling the calf often helps (foam Rolling the shin-split directly is not good)

       

      Also, from personal experience:

      - take a look at the support in your shoes (you've already mention this, but I provide my story for the benefit of others).  I had a pair of really old and beatup running sneakers I was wearing.  Got a new pair, splits went away in a week.

      2021 Goals: 50mpw 'cause there's nothing else to do

      Kingfish


        I hate to think I'm not up to walking. That's depressing. I do a calf stretch before I start which I figured would help. When the shin gets bad my foot hits the ground flat instead of heel then toe. That's when I stop for a minute to let the throbbing go away. When I start up again it's better. I suppose I could try putting the orthotics in the hikers and see what happens.

         

        I've only had shinsplints three times, but it was annoying enough that I looked it up.  At the time this is what I've found:

         

        - Nobody's exactly sure what cause it

        - Prevalent theory is that you're just not up to whatever effort you're putting in

        - Icing seems to be a preferred method of alleviation (R.I.C.E.)

        - Massaging / Rolling the calf often helps (foam Rolling the shin-split directly is not good)

         

        Also, from personal experience:

        - take a look at the support in your shoes (you've already mention this, but I provide my story for the benefit of others).  I had a pair of really old and beatup running sneakers I was wearing.  Got a new pair, splits went away in a week.


        Interval Junkie --Nobby

          I hate to think I'm not up to walking. That's depressing. I do a calf stretch before I start which I figured would help. When the shin gets bad my foot hits the ground flat instead of heel then toe. That's when I stop for a minute to let the throbbing go away. When I start up again it's better. I suppose I could try putting the orthotics in the hikers and see what happens.

           

           

          I have no idea if orthotics help or not.

           

          I'd imagine the shin-splints haven't yet healed.  So, your light exercises is probably aggravating it (rather than causing it).  Give it a week of rest before you try again.

           

          [Neither am I a doctor, nor do I play one on TV . . . ever since that malpractice suit]

          2021 Goals: 50mpw 'cause there's nothing else to do

            - Nobody's exactly sure what cause it

            - Prevalent theory is that you're just not up to whatever effort you're putting in

            - Icing seems to be a preferred method of alleviation (R.I.C.E.)

            - Massaging / Rolling the calf often helps (foam Rolling the shin-split directly is not good)

             

            Also, from personal experience:

            - take a look at the support in your shoes (you've already mention this, but I provide my story for the benefit of others).  I had a pair of really old and beatup running sneakers I was wearing.  Got a new pair, splits went away in a week.

             

            All good stuff. Since I can't seem to stop falling off the wagon, I've found myself restarting running quite a few times. I think mikeymike coined "Bonkin 2.0" many years ago. I think I'm up to 8.0 or 9.0 by now. Anyway, all that to say, I usually get shin splints, calf cramps, etc whenever I restart. Take it easy and they will likely go away soon.

             

            One of my favorites, is to start running a hot bath. While it fills, I'll kneel down (like a prayer), and then sit back on my heels. It gives a good stretch to the shins - but be warned - sometimes it can hurt. I'll sit there for 30-60 seconds a couple of times and then lay back for a normal bath soaking the rest of my sore muscles.

             

            I've found calf stretching helpful. I'll also sometimes roll my shins (carefully) with "The Stick" when I can find it. It does hurt a little when doing it, but the shins feel good afterwards.

             

            Good luck.

            When it’s all said and done, will you have said more than you’ve done?

            Kingfish


               

              All good stuff. Since I can't seem to stop falling off the wagon, I've found myself restarting running quite a few times. I think mikeymike coined "Bonkin 2.0" many years ago. I think I'm up to 8.0 or 9.0 by now. Anyway, all that to say, I usually get shin splints, calf cramps, etc whenever I restart. Take it easy and they will likely go away soon.

               

              One of my favorites, is to start running a hot bath. While it fills, I'll kneel down (like a prayer), and then sit back on my heels. It gives a good stretch to the shins - but be warned - sometimes it can hurt. I'll sit there for 30-60 seconds a couple of times and then lay back for a normal bath soaking the rest of my sore muscles.

               

              I've found calf stretching helpful. I'll also sometimes roll my shins (carefully) with "The Stick" when I can find it. It does hurt a little when doing it, but the shins feel good afterwards.

               

              Good luck.

               

              For me this weight loss thing is like being a hamster on a wheel. I like your idea of the shin stretch and will try it. I've also been told rolling the shins when you feel the pull helps too.

                I suggest either reducing intensity and distance.

                agree with stretching/rolling, etc, but would add to stretch and roll your whole leg. Sometimes tightness in one area of the leg may impact another area.

                Also, if they aren't too bad, sometimes the shin sleeves can help alleviate the pain.

                Also, some body weight strength exercises may help strengthen the muscles as well.

                  for shin splint prevention i also make sure i don't run in bad shoes. another prevention methods are that after every run i walk on my heels then on my toes to develop the muscles. in addition those those two things, i also will find a stair or ledge and do 15 calf raisers with my toes straight, pointed out, and finally pointed in.

                  https://www.instagram.com/tfilarski/

                  Daydreamer1


                    Quite a few years ago my wife dealt with this problem.  She had been a long time walker, walking 3.5 miles several times a week. One summer she started biking more and didn't walk as much. When it got cooler she went back to walking again. About that time we changed routes and this included more hills.  She then developed shin splints, something she had never had before.

                     

                    At first she tried all the common cures which was basically RICE.  The only thing that did was make it worse. After a miserable fall and winter she finally went to a ortho Dr.  We went in there thinking stress fracture, orthodics, shoe fit, joint problems, etc. since the pain would run from the ankle to the knee at times.

                     

                    He did a brief exam, diagnosed Medical Tibial Stress Syndrome, and explained exactly what it was. Basically he said it's a imbalance of the muscles where the calves are so much stronger than the ones on the front of the tibia.  He blamed it on her building up her calf muscles from biking.  When she would walk she would go about  a 1/2 mile and the pain would start. Her feet would also start slapping the road. What this was coming from was the muscles on the front of the tibia were not slowing the foot on the downward motion. The pain was coming from the muscles being weak and therefore overworked.

                     

                    He told her to throw RICE out the window and gave her a number of exercises to do, most, or all, targeting the muscles on the front of the shin. Unfortunately I can't remember what they all were and don't know where the paper is that he gave her.  I did do some searching and found a site with two of them.  http://www.sportsinjurybulletin.com/archive/1079-shin-splints.htm#   After doing them for about 6 weeks the pain went away and never returned.  These two that are on this site are the ones she did the most. After about 2 weeks her feet were no longer slapping the ground when she walked and the pain was starting to get better.

                     

                    My daughter will get shin splints. If she does these exercises she can get over them. If she's lazy and tries RICE they persist and she quits walking completely.  Over the years we have shared these exercises with numerous people or know those who went to this same Doctor. Those that work to build up the muscles have had good success. Those that try the other stuff like RICE seem to deal with the pain much longer or just end up quitting walking or running.

                     

                    Good luck and don't give up. Maybe this will help.

                    Kingfish


                       

                      He did a brief exam, diagnosed Medical Tibial Stress Syndrome, and explained exactly what it was. Basically he said it's a imbalance of the muscles where the calves are so much stronger than the ones on the front of the tibia.  He blamed it on her building up her calf muscles from biking.  When she would walk she would go about  a 1/2 mile and the pain would start. Her feet would also start slapping the road. What this was coming from was the muscles on the front of the tibia were not slowing the foot on the downward motion. The pain was coming from the muscles being weak and therefore overworked.

                       

                       

                       

                       

                      Makes perfect sense to me, that's exactly what's happening here. Instead of heel/toe my left foot is flat-footing when the shin really starts to pull. I have fairly big calves too so that's probably part of the equation here. Thanks VERY much, I'll have a look at those strengthening exercises.

                      iRunnerWV


                        I have had good results with compression sleeves and a progressive program to increase my endurance.

                         

                        Icing does well too for me.

                         

                        Good luck.

                        hog4life


                          I had a severe case many years ago. I was running on old shoes that had a lot of miles on them. Mostly what I discovered that helped me, was doing a lot of what's already been mentioned with the strengthening stuff. I would also recommend going to a local running store to get fitted for the proper shoes. How old are the orthotics? Maybe they need replaced. One oth er key that was briefly mentioned above is the calf muscle. Most articles that I've read through research with Dr Google, and running forums will say if you start having a muscle issue in one area, there is usually another muscle or group of muscles that are weak causing a gait change. IMO, your weight doesn't seem to be the culprit.

                            windshield wipers with therabands made a huge difference for me. Good luck!

                            Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the number of moments that take our breath away...(unkown)




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                            KillerB


                              Try a cushion shoe.  Saucony offers some good choices.