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Can you make a shoe work? (Read 106 times)

Gizmo2019


    I normally wear brooks Ravenna’s and saucony guide ISO’s. I’ve been wanting to try out mizunos. Found an old cheap pair of Mizuno Wave Rider 22. It’s neutral shoe unlike the others (stability). But since I started on a new treadmill with these shoes, I’ve had tingling, burning sensation on mostly my left lower leg, I liken it to it feeling as if my foot falls asleep,

     

    It’s getting better, slowly but I’m wondering if I can force a shoe to work for me or will I just keep hurting myself? My plantar fasciitis is mildly coming back too...but you know I really can’t pinpoint if it’s 100% due to the shoes. I used them a lot for a few weeks now I’ve cut down to 2-3 times a week ..very short miles.

     

    is it the shoe? And if so can I make it work gradually? I had a friend who kept injuring herself bc she said she didnt give each shoe enough time to get used to it..

    darkwave


    Mother of Cats

      New shoes are much cheaper than physical therapy.

      Everyone's gotta running blog; I'm the only one with a POOL-RUNNING blog.

       

      And...if you want a running Instagram where all the pictures are of cats, I've got you covered.

      Half Crazy K 2.0


        Unless it's from something that is a simple fix, like youve been tying the laces too tight, ditch the shoe. It's possible the shoes have all changed, but I started wearing the Guides and at one point was alternating between Wave Riders and Ravenna. It the shoe works for you, don't worry so much about how it's labelled.

         

        On a personal note, I have only worn Waved Riders for at least the past 5 years. I hated the 22s to the point that I bought some different brands. The 23s and the WaveKnit version of the 23 are a big improvement over the 22s. I felt the 22s were way too soft--it felt like my foot would hit the ground and then would sink deeper into the shoe. Usually Wave Riders are much firmer, which was why I liked them so much.

          Easing into a new-to-you pair of shoes will alleviate issues. Going "cold turkey" and running exclusively in new-to-you shoes almost always causes issues.

           

          Wear them 1 out of 3-4 times for a few weeks (your old shoe the other times), then half the time for a while, and finally make them your primary shoe.

           

          Most experienced runners have a corral of shoes, and seldom wear the same pair two times in a row. This reduces chances of injury/strain caused by a particular shoe's effect on gait. If you're running less than 15 miles a week, it shouldn't be an issue though.

          55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

          Gizmo2019


            New shoes are much cheaper than physical therapy.

            Haha. I’m going to use this on my husband after he says “but I just bought you running shoes..”

            Gizmo2019


              Unless it's from something that is a simple fix, like youve been tying the laces too tight, ditch the shoe. It's possible the shoes have all changed, but I started wearing the Guides and at one point was alternating between Wave Riders and Ravenna. It the shoe works for you, don't worry so much about how it's labelled.

               

              On a personal note, I have only worn Waved Riders for at least the past 5 years. I hated the 22s to the point that I bought some different brands. The 23s and the WaveKnit version of the 23 are a big improvement over the 22s. I felt the 22s were way too soft--it felt like my foot would hit the ground and then would sink deeper into the shoe. Usually Wave Riders are much firmer, which was why I liked them so much.

               

              I did realize that I was tying it too tight. It was defly a circulation issue. But it’s not like my other shoes where i can tie a shoe to a certain tightness and it won’t fall off bc the toe box helps me from sliding out. It’s also a cushioning thing too I think. I think there’s just not the right support for me. But I’ll wait it out...

              Gizmo2019


                Thanks bill,

                the problem I have now is that I have a couple running shoes for outdoors and now an indoor running shoe that may not work. How do I justify buying a second shoe for indoors? Esply when I’m not even putting in many miles (yet!)? I was thinking of switching my outdoor shoe to my indoor shoe with bleach and all sorts of cleaners but...ugh I think it might ruin the shoe and ...just gross...

                  how do you justify?

                   

                  By seeing some on a TREMENDOUS SALE! 😁

                   

                  Check the clearance page at running warehouse, or even browse through your local Ross or Marshall's. You'd be surprised what ends up there for $10-50, in the last 6 months there have been sporadic stocking of Nike Zoom Fly models, as well as regular training shoes.

                  55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

                  Gizmo2019


                    how do you justify?

                     

                    By seeing some on a TREMENDOUS SALE! 😁

                     

                    Check the clearance page at running warehouse, or even browse through your local Ross or Marshall's. You'd be surprised what ends up there for $10-50, in the last 6 months there have been sporadic stocking of Nike Zoom Fly models, as well as regular training shoes.

                     

                    Ok I can do the online stuff but I HATE shopping!! Even before covid. You find the shoe but not my size, you find the size but not my support...that’s one of the few things I love about online shopping. ok I’m going to take your advice and keep an eye out.

                    skim1124


                    Running to eat

                      I don't know how common I am among runners, but I have never experienced an injury caused by shoes.  I've worn stability shoes, max cushion shoes, racing flats, and neutral shoes of different brands (almost all of them bought cheap 1 or 2 years after they were released) and while there are differences in comfort level and fit, ultimately I was able to make all of them work.  Truly, I can say that I've not had a bad pair, though some were easier to like right away than others.  Perhaps my gait is such that it can accommodate different types of shoes with no ill effect.  Obviously, this is a case of YMMV.  But I think that people overthink the importance of shoes (as per the marketing of shoe companies) and try too hard to find the perfect shoe when it might be that most of them (though not all of them) would do just fine with most shoes.

                      Marathon PR: 2:52 (2006 Chicago)

                      Ultra #1: DNF at The North Face Thailand 100K (Feb 4, 2017)

                      Ultra #2: Finished in 6:53:03 at the Des Plaines River Trail Races 50M (Oct 14, 2017)

                      Ultra #3: Finished in 12:55:04 at The North Face Thailand 100k (Feb 1, 2020)

                      Ultra #4: Finished self-organized 100-miler in 19:28:53 (Oct 3, 2020)

                      kilkee


                      runktrun

                        I was a diehard mizuno fan until about 2015.  They must have changed something in the soles of all their shoes because after that, nothing worked, and I would get a numb/burning/painful sensation in one or both of my feet only a few miles into a run.  So it's probably the specific shoe.  I've heard similar complaints from others about mizuno.  If you don't want to give up on the shoe, try using them only for a few short, easy runs, or walk around in them to see if you can "break them in."  (You really shouldn't have to "break in a shoe.")

                        Not running for my health, but in spite of it.

                        darkwave


                        Mother of Cats

                          I don't know how common I am among runners, but I have never experienced an injury caused by shoes.  I've worn stability shoes, max cushion shoes, racing flats, and neutral shoes of different brands (almost all of them bought cheap 1 or 2 years after they were released) and while there are differences in comfort level and fit, ultimately I was able to make all of them work.  Truly, I can say that I've not had a bad pair, though some were easier to like right away than others.  Perhaps my gait is such that it can accommodate different types of shoes with no ill effect.  Obviously, this is a case of YMMV.  But I think that people overthink the importance of shoes (as per the marketing of shoe companies) and try too hard to find the perfect shoe when it might be that most of them (though not all of them) would do just fine with most shoes.

                           

                          I think it varies by the runner.  For myself, I cannot run in a very cushioned shoe or one with too tight a toebox without getting injured.  I am picky out of necessity, not choice.

                           

                          Out of curiosity, how many miles do you run per week.  I suspect that having the right shoe matters more when your mileage is higher.

                          Everyone's gotta running blog; I'm the only one with a POOL-RUNNING blog.

                           

                          And...if you want a running Instagram where all the pictures are of cats, I've got you covered.

                            I don't know how common I am among runners, but I have never experienced an injury caused by shoes.  But I think that people overthink the importance of shoes (as per the marketing of shoe companies) and try too hard to find the perfect shoe when it might be that most of them (though not all of them) would do just fine with most shoes.

                             

                            I'm sort of the same, the only injuries I can directly relate to shoes are acute holes worn into my feet or ankles causing blisters and/or bleeding. Or "hot spots" where there is some other defect like overlapping seams or missing chunks of midsole under the sockliner (Altra) causing discomfort. And of course the sore calves after the first spiked worked of the season.

                             

                            I've worn some shoes that are far more comfortable to wear than others regarding shape and materials, but the uncomfortable ones didn't necessarily cause overuse injuries. I still postulate that you need to run more than 25 miles a week in a single pair of shoes for there to be any indication of overuse injury caused by the shoe's effect on your gait. And that's a rough number; it's probably a wide range with multiple variants such as age, level of fitness, other activities (aka day job), running surfaces, etc.

                             

                            Shoes ARE overrated! At least one dude ran a sub 4:00 mile barefoot, and someone else has run a 2:15:00 marathon barefoot. They would likely be faster in shoes, but that just goes to show you that shoes are overrated. And the cheap $20 running shoes you see in Walmart and other stores are actually BETTER than the top of the line shoes from 20 years ago, mainly from copying other designs, but also because of advancements in materials and manufacturing processes. Shoe companies are always coming up with a gimmick or fancy name for a material or shape to convince you to buy THEIR shoes, often just changing the colorway and moving the overlays or stitching a bit so you'll think THIS year's shoe is "improved" from LAST year's shoe. The Nike Vaporfly tech is the only exceptional improvement in shoe performance I've seen in the last 20 years. And everyone thinks it's just because there's some Carbon involved, and they are now thinking that ANY shoe with a "carbon plate" is the way to go (not). The Vaporfly shoes use a variety of technologies that work together to reduce fatigue while increasing rebound, and reducing weight to an extent. Basically they are maxcushion shoes that have springs in them to counter the energy-sapping of the cushion. There have been other improvements in the last 5 years, mainly with midsole materials; which has become sort of an Arms Race; Fresh Foam, React, ZoomX, Hyperburst, FuelCell, DNA AMP, etc . The previous 20 years have kind of been a Dark Ages for running shoes, and now we're seeing a renaissance with companies actively seeking to make shoes lighter and more comfortable than their competitors. And not just racing shoes, but training shoes (thanks for the kickoff, Hoka!)

                            55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

                            Half Crazy K 2.0


                                I still postulate that you need to run more than 25 miles a week in a single pair of shoes for there to be any indication of overuse injury caused by the shoe's effect on your gait. And that's a rough number; it's probably a wide range with multiple variants such as age, level of fitness, other activities (aka day job), running surfaces, etc.

                               

                               

                               

                              It depends how bad of a match the shoe is. The worst experience I had with shoes was when I was running maybe 10 miles per week. I got a pair of Adidas Supernovas. I knew nothing about shoes and apparently the version I picked up was either heavy stability or motion control. It literally felt like I was fighting the shoe whenever I placed my foot on the ground. I started having knee pain almost immediately.

                              Running Problem


                              Problem Child

                                I started running in the Ravenna and tried out the Mizuno's for a few store demos. I've never had much problem with the shoes I buy and currently run in the Nike Pegasus because I find them for a good price. I also justify buying new shoes by saying "well they don't go bad, and I'd waste the money on other things that won't last as long, and I'm also an adult and have the money so I'm going to buy them." I remember thinking the Wave Rider sounded like I was wearing tap shoes and I was glad I'd run in them during a demo day than buying a pair and hating them. I think the soles were part plastic.

                                 

                                I would say too tight of laces could cause the pain you're feeling. I had it the other day on a run outside and tried to make it better by loosening up the laces and it helped to a point. The next day, same shoes, no problem.

                                 

                                So yeah, I personally can "make a shoe work" and have. I might also just fit a lot of different shoes.

                                Many of us aren't sure what the hell point you are trying to make and no matter how we guess, it always seems to be something else. Which usually means a person is doing it on purpose.

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